6.1/10
18
2 user

Peter (2000)

A mentally-handicapped young man with a hidden artistic flair forms a relationship with a young college intern.

Director:

John Swon
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Cast

Credited cast:
Doug Aamoth Doug Aamoth ... Mike
Sarah Chart Sarah Chart ... Annette
Mark Dahlen Mark Dahlen ... Patient
Marcus Edward Marcus Edward ... Peter
David Fox-Brenton David Fox-Brenton ... Dr. Macy
Ryan Logan Ryan Logan ... Dan
Anne Rutledge Anne Rutledge ... Judge
Nick Schrader Nick Schrader ... Thalian
Chayo Smith Chayo Smith ... Bonnie
Sara Stevenson Sara Stevenson ... Denise
John Swon John Swon ... Mugger
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Storyline

To the rest of the world, Peter seems little more than a blank canvas. As a mentally-handicapped young man spending his days in a state hospital, Peter remains unmoved by his confined conditions or the bleak future that awaits him on the horizon. But behind a mask of indifference, Peter hides remarkable talent waiting to burst forth. His secret is revealed only to one, Denise, a young college intern struggling with a pessimistic future of her own. Together they face a similar challenge: give up or move on. Written by John

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Taglines:

Sometimes your reach exceeds your grasp

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

October 2000 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Reel Cinema Entertainment See more »
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Technical Specs

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Actor Doug Aamoth ad-libbed most of his lines. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Stagecraft
15 February 2009 | by mickey-jansSee all my reviews

'Peter' looks and feels like a theatrical production - a staged one. The camera lingers on scenes well past the edit point of most films and scenes between actors usually stay on a mid-level shot instead of at a minimum cutting between close-ups. The technique, if it is a technique and not just a sign of inexperience on the part of the filmmakers, is surprisingly effective in some of the dramatic scenes as we stay with the actors. You don't feel like you're sharing the moment, but you do feel like you're in the second row at the theatre watching two actors pour their hearts out.

Good performances by most of the cast and look for the guy playing the doctor - I've seen him in some 80's sitcom re-runs like "Benson" - which is as close as any of the cast comes to be "recognizable."


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