Former United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop a zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments and threatens to destroy humanity itself.

Director:

Marc Forster

Writers:

Matthew Michael Carnahan (screenplay), Drew Goddard (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
Popularity
504 ( 215)
3 wins & 25 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Brad Pitt ... Gerry Lane
Mireille Enos ... Karin Lane
Daniella Kertesz ... Segen
James Badge Dale ... Captain Speke
Ludi Boeken ... Jurgen Warmbrunn
Matthew Fox ... Parajumper
Fana Mokoena ... Thierry Umutoni
David Morse ... Ex-CIA Agent
Elyes Gabel ... Andrew Fassbach
Peter Capaldi ... W.H.O. Doctor
Pierfrancesco Favino ... W.H.O. Doctor
Ruth Negga ... W.H.O. Doctor
Moritz Bleibtreu ... W.H.O. Doctor
Sterling Jerins ... Constance Lane
Abigail Hargrove ... Rachel Lane
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Storyline

Life for former United Nations investigator Gerry Lane and his family seems content. Suddenly, the world is plagued by a mysterious infection turning whole human populations into rampaging mindless zombies. After barely escaping the chaos, Lane is persuaded to go on a mission to investigate this disease. What follows is a perilous trek around the world where Lane must brave horrific dangers and long odds to find answers before human civilization falls. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

I can't leave my family


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense frightening zombie sequences, violence and disturbing images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Marc Forster states that he prefers the extended, unrated cut of the film. For him it's not just about the additional blood and gore, it's about the overall intensity compared to the PG-13-rated version. Forster says that although he's proud of the theatrical version, he felt a bit "handcuffed" when he was trying to deliver the toned-down PG-13-rated version. See more »

Goofs

When Gerry is in the research facility viruses room, while the zombie is outside waiting, a crewmember's face is reflected for a second in one of the windows. See more »

Quotes

Karin Lane: [upon seeing cramped ship accommodations] It's bigger than our apartment on 72nd.
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Crazy Credits

The opening logos are shown in dark blueish color with intense music in the background. See more »

Alternate Versions

An unrated cut released on home video adds almost seven minutes of additional action and some alternate/re-edited shots. See more »

Connections

Featured in T00nVision: Best & Worst Horror Films (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Follow Me
Written by Matt Bellamy
Performed by Muse
Courtesy of Warner Music U.K. Ltd.
By Arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
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User Reviews

 
Don't give up
22 July 2013 | by moviemanMASee all my reviews

At the end of World War Z, just as the credits began rolling, a gentleman, scratch that, an idiot spoke up from the back of the theatre exclaiming, "What? That sucked! The book was nothing like that! Booo!" I'm sure he scurried away back home, logged online, and began tweeting, posting, and blogging, furthering his rant. Much like my response to him at the theatre, I hope he receives silence in return.

It's true, World War Z is nothing like the book. The book is told from the point of view AFTER the war. It's a "historical," account of what happened during the war. Rather than make a mockumentary with flashbacks, which would have been the wrong decision in my opinion, the filmmakers decided to put us right in the middle of the action.

When adapting a piece of literature it is impossible to bring every page, every paragraph, every nuance onto the screen. Some have come close depending on the material, but for the most part, they all have to take their own creative licenses. After all, it's called an "adaptation," for a reason, otherwise they would call it a copy or mimic.

Where World War Z works (that's a mouthful) and where so many others fail is that just because the world slips into total and utter chaos, doesn't mean that governments, military, and law enforcement agencies go away. Quite the opposite. If anything, these scenarios bring out the best of all of them. We see generals, UN delegates, and scientists trying to solve complex issues that they don't know anything about. Rather than going into hiding, they act. Society doesn't crumble. Bands of cannibals and leather strapped gangs don't patrol the streets with necklaces made of teeth. People do what they can to survive, and the higher ups try their best to find a fast and effective solution.

At first, I thought the movie started too fast. How could something this violent and concentrated go undetected, but after a while I got it. The opening montage of news reports said it all. How many of us listen to everything we hear on the news? Exactly. So much goes undetected while we focus on issues that effect us immediately. It's too late when the virus touches US soil. Not even social media can keep up with it.

As far as zombie movies go this one is pretty great. Though I think 28 Days Later takes the cake in terms of realism, in-camera effects, and sheer terror, this one holds its own. Brad Pitt plays a former UN investigator who is traveling with his family just as the zombie attack on Philadelphia unfolds. The film goes from 0-60 before you take a sip of your Coke. This is a fast paced, edge of your seat thrill ride led by one of the finest actors of this generation (Pitt's acting ability is far too underrated and lost in the kerfuffle of tabloid news).

For those of you who stare at the ticket window debating whether or not to see a film in 3D or standard, you might want to spend the extra few dollars to see this one in 3D (I know it's asking a lot, but maybe you can sneak some candy or a bottle of water to offset the concession stand price - deal with it). I tend to air on the side of "screw it, I want to see it in 3D." Now not every movie NEEDS to be seen in 3D, hell there are really only a couple that absolutely have to be seen in all three dimensions (Avatar and maybe Life of Pi), but this one really surprised me. 3D is not about things jumping out at you, but it's about layers. Luckily this film has both. Big chase scenes in Philly, particles floating about in South Korea, and tracking shots in Jerusalem make this one of the 3D events of the year. No exaggeration.

Like so many other summer blockbusters before it, civilization is on the brink of extinction and only a handful of experts can save us. What World War Z does that so many have failed is give us hope. Hope that humanity won't dissolve into nothingness. In the face of sheer danger these fighters stand tall, take a deep breath, look the enemy in the eye, and say, "No."


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

USA | UK | Malta

Language:

English | Spanish | Hebrew | Arabic

Release Date:

21 June 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

World War Z See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$190,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$66,411,834, 23 June 2013

Gross USA:

$202,807,711

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$540,455,876
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Unrated Edition)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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