8.6/10
1,505,676
4,320 user 629 critic

Interstellar (2014)

Trailer
2:28 | Trailer
A team of explorers travel through a wormhole in space in an attempt to ensure humanity's survival.

Director:

Christopher Nolan
Popularity
48 ( 17)
Top Rated Movies #29 | Won 1 Oscar. Another 43 wins & 148 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ellen Burstyn ... Murph (Older)
Matthew McConaughey ... Cooper
Mackenzie Foy ... Murph (10 Yrs.)
John Lithgow ... Donald
Timothée Chalamet ... Tom (15 Yrs.)
David Oyelowo ... School Principal
Collette Wolfe ... Ms. Hanley
Francis X. McCarthy ... Boots (as Francis Xavier McCarthy)
Bill Irwin ... TARS (voice)
Anne Hathaway ... Brand
Andrew Borba ... Smith
Wes Bentley ... Doyle
William Devane ... Williams
Michael Caine ... Professor Brand
David Gyasi ... Romilly
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Storyline

Earth's future has been riddled by disasters, famines, and droughts. There is only one way to ensure mankind's survival: Interstellar travel. A newly discovered wormhole in the far reaches of our solar system allows a team of astronauts to go where no man has gone before, a planet that may have the right environment to sustain human life. Written by ahmetkozan

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

If You Can Go Beyond, You Can Go Back See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some intense perilous action and brief strong language. | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The word "interstellar" is said only once in this movie. It's said at the middle point. See more »

Goofs

In the caravan setting out from the village when the situation on Earth hits bottom there's a clear outline of a Mercedes 190 radiator, showing the Mercedes emblem. That point in time is two generations from now, making that car, which was manufactured up until early 2000, roughly 74 years old. See more »

Quotes

CASE: Endurance rotation is 67, 68 RPM.
Cooper: CASE, get ready to match our spin with the retro thrusters.
CASE: It's not possible.
Cooper: No. It's necessary.
See more »

Crazy Credits

"This motion picture was shot and finished on film" See more »

Alternate Versions

The 70mm IMAX version is two minutes shorter than the regular 70mm, Digital IMAX, 35mm, and digital projection versions. This is because the end credits are played in an abbreviated slide-show form (rather than scrolling from bottom to top), due to the size capacity of the IMAX platters, which can hold a maximum of 167 minutes of film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Saturday Night Live: Woody Harrelson/Kendrick Lamar (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night
(uncredited)
Written by Dylan Thomas
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User Reviews

 
A visual and auditory marvel
13 April 2016 | by Jared_AndrewsSee all my reviews

Interstellar is a movie like no other. Unlike many apocalyptic sci-fi films that feature advanced technology as the source of our destruction (ala The Terminator movies), it instead asserts that technology will save us.

Not everyone in Interstellar recognizes the potential of advanced technology. Most dismiss it as a waste of time and resources, and not just old curmudgeons feel this way. Thoughtful, intelligent young characters share this sentiment. This belief gained steam following a world-wide blight that wiped out the vast majority of life on earth—crops and humans.

Farming became paramount while advanced technology was deemed frivolous. Cooper (McConaughey) remains one of the few survivors who still appreciates the need for engineering. He feels like a man lost in time, until he stumbles into the headquarters of NASA (which had been operating in secret due to public disapproval). Here he meets others who realize that a return to our old ways is unsustainable and will ultimately lead to our demise. We need technology to save us. As Michael Caine, playing the brilliant (duh!) Professor Brand, eloquently tells Cooper, "we were never meant to save the world. We were meant to leave it." For a movie that won an Oscar for Best Visual Effects (and deservedly so) the sound stole the show. Hans Zimmer (Dark Knight Trilogy) unleashed a performance that was, quite appropriately, out of this world. Never have I seen a movie elevated so much by its score. The sound literally took my breath away. Forgive me for the next paragraph. I will gush irresponsibly about the magic that is this movie's sound. Skip it if you please. You have your warning.

The music fueled every important scene. In every meaningful moment Zimmer's harmonies captivated watchers' attention in the way of a coach commanding a locker room with a pregame speech. The music elucidated those emotional scenes, particularly ones featuring Cooper and his daughter, in a way that no words or visual ques possibly could. I sat frozen, jaw agape, with tears pouring down my cheeks as the music completely overwhelmed my emotions. The sound penetrated my soul and reverberated through my body, flowing to my appendages, supplying me with life like a heartbeat pumping blood through my veins. The music was truly the life force of movie.

Yes, we all witnessed a visual triumph, a daring creative wonder the likes of which we haven't encountered since Inception. Yes, nearly every actor's performance proved worthy of commendation. McConaughey is on fire. Chastain is blossoming into a star. At this point Michael Cain exudes such knowledge and wisdom by merely appearing on screen that if he were cast as Albert Einstein, people would wonder if the role were beneath him. All this considered, and the sound still towered over everything.

I walked out of the theater believing that I had experienced something unique, something truly special. Interstellar inspires, it awes, and above all it entertains. I cannot ask for more than that.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Country:

USA | UK | Canada

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 November 2014 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Untitled Steven Spielberg Space Project See more »

Filming Locations:

Okotoks, Alberta, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$165,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$47,510,360, 9 November 2014

Gross USA:

$188,020,017

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$701,795,571
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Datasat | Dolby Digital | IMAX 6-Track | Dolby Surround 7.1 | Sonics-DDP (IMAX version)

Color:

Color (FotoKem)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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