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Bright Star (2009)

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The three-year romance between 19th-century poet John Keats and Fanny Brawne near the end of his life.

Director:

Jane Campion

Writers:

Jane Campion, Jane Campion (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 16 wins & 52 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Abbie Cornish ... Fanny Brawne
Ben Whishaw ... John Keats
Paul Schneider ... Mr. Brown
Kerry Fox ... Mrs. Brawne
Edie Martin ... Toots
Thomas Brodie-Sangster ... Samuel
Claudie Blakley ... Maria Dilke
Gerard Monaco ... Charles Dilke
Antonia Campbell-Hughes ... Abigail
Samuel Roukin ... Reynolds
Amanda Hale ... Reynolds Sister
Lucinda Raikes ... Reynolds Sister
Samuel Barnett ... Mr. Severn
Jonathan Aris ... Mr. Hunt
Olly Alexander ... Tom Keats
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Storyline

It's 1818 in Hampstead Village on the outskirts of London. Poet Charles Brown lives in one half of a house, the Dilkes family the other. Through association with the Dilkes, the fatherless Brawne family knows Mr. Brown. Mr. Brown and the Brawne's eldest daughter, Fanny, don't like each other. She thinks him arrogant and rude; he feels that she's a pretentious flirt, knowing only how to sew (admittedly well as she makes all her own fashionable clothes), and voicing opinions on subjects about which she knows nothing. Insecure struggling poet John Keats comes to live with his friend, Mr. Brown. Miss Brawne and Mr. Keats have a mutual attraction to each other, but their relationship is slow to develop, in part, since Mr. Brown does whatever he can to keep the two apart. Other obstacles face the couple, including their eventual overwhelming passion for each other clouding their view of what the other does, Mr. Keats' struggling career, which offers him little in the way of monetary ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A thing of beauty is a joy forever. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic elements, some sensuality, brief language and incidental smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | Australia | France

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

9 October 2009 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bright Star - Estrela Cintilante See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$8,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£207,881 (United Kingdom), 8 November 2009, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$189,703, 20 September 2009, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$4,444,637, 10 December 2009
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The cat's name in the film, as well as in real life, is Topper. See more »

Goofs

When Severn drinks from his teacup, he spills tea into his saucer. In the next shot, the same sequence is unintentionally repeated from a different angle. See more »

Quotes

John Keats: [voice-over while Fanny reads his letter] Will you confess this in a letter? You must write immediately and do all you can to console me in it. Make it rich as draught of poppies to intoxicate me. Write the softest words and kiss them that I may at least touch my lips where yours have been.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Ben Whishaw recites Keats' "Ode to a Nightingale" over the closing credits. See more »


Soundtracks

Scotch Reel and Bonnie Highland Laddie
(1816)
Written by Thomas Wilson (as Wilson)
From the Album "Regency Ballroom English Country Dance Music from the Era of Jane Austen"
Arranged and Performed by Spare Parts, Bill Matthiesen, Liz Stell, Eric Buddington
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Indie Film Perfection
10 October 2009 | by J_TrexSee all my reviews

Just saw this at the Ritz East. There wasn't much else playing & this had an 8.1 rating on IMDb so I thought I'd check it out. My instincts were well rewarded because this was one of the best movies I've seen. It was a very well constructed film detailing the relationship of the Romantic poet John Keats with his lover Fanny Brawne, as well as Keats' relationship with his friend and patron Charles Brown.

The actors were relatively unknown to me. I'm pretty sure I've seen Paul Schneider, who played Charles Brown, in other films. But Abbie Cornish, who played Fanny, and Ben Whishaw, who played Keats, are new to me. They were great. I can't imagine anyone doing a better job.

Jane Campion, the Director, brought the period to life. And the character development was outstanding. The viewer really felt a connection to the characters in the film, even minor characters, like Fanny's mother & siblings, were highly engaging. Fanny's younger sister was the most adorable little girl in film since Gretl in "The Sound of Music".

The music and mood of the movie fit the period and subject perfectly. I was mesmerized from the beginning to the end of this great film. I think I'll go back and see it again. It was that good.

The movie ended, while the credits rolled, with Whishaw reciting "Ode to a Nightingale" set to classical music. The audience stayed up until the last credit rolled. It was a nice touch to finish the movie with.

This movie will likely be the definitive film about Romantic poets. Maybe Campion will direct a movie about Byron in Greece or Shelley in Italy. One thing is for sure, she set the bar pretty high with "Bright Star".


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