7.0/10
2,539
21 user 69 critic

Jellyfish (2007)

Meduzot (original title)
Unrated | | Drama | 28 June 2007 (Israel)
Meduzot (the Hebrew word for Jellyfish) tells the story of three very different Israeli women living in Tel Aviv whose intersecting stories weave an unlikely portrait of modern Israeli life... See full summary »

Writer:

Shira Geffen
5 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sarah Adler ... Batia
Nikol Leidman Nikol Leidman ... Girl
Gera Sandler ... Michael
Noa Raban ... Keren (as Noa Knoller)
Ma. Nenita Flores Dela Torre Ma. Nenita Flores Dela Torre ... Joy (as Ma-nenita De Latorre)
Zaharira Harifai ... Malka
Ilanit Ben-Yaakov ... Galia
Naama Nisim Naama Nisim ... Naomi
Bruria Albeck ... Relly
Tzahi Grad ... Police Officer
Amos Shoov ... Eyal
Assi Dayan ... Eldad
Liron Vaisman ... Shiri
Miri Fabian ... Nili
Shalom Shmuelov Shalom Shmuelov ... Menachem
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Storyline

Meduzot (the Hebrew word for Jellyfish) tells the story of three very different Israeli women living in Tel Aviv whose intersecting stories weave an unlikely portrait of modern Israeli life. Batya, a catering waitress, takes in a young child apparently abandoned at a local beach. Batya is one of the servers at the wedding reception of Keren, a young bride who breaks her leg in trying to escape from a locked toilet stall, which ruins her chance at a romantic honeymoon in the Caribbean. One of the guests is Joy, a Philippine chore woman attending the event with her employer, and who doesn't speak any Hebrew (she communicates mainly in English), and who is guilt-ridden after having left her young son behind in the Philippines. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Love. Longing. Magic. (USA)

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During a screening of the film in Albany, New York, in 2009, co-director Etgar Keret stated that the title of the film is a reference to the fact that jellyfish drift in the sea and do not have much control over their fate or direction. This is interesting given the tagline added to the poster after the film won at Cannes, "life stings" See more »

User Reviews

 
Pretentious and dull
20 April 2008 | by wondercriticSee all my reviews

I went to see this because I'd never seen Tel-Aviv, where the story is set. I was disappointed, since it doesn't offer many views of Israel's largest metropolis. It's also pretentious—one of those movies that leaves you guessing at its meaning until you ultimately give up with a shrug of the shoulders.

The main protagonist is Batya, a woman in her twenties' who works as a waitress at catered weddings. Her parents evidently don't care about her very much, and when a little girl walks out of the sea with an inflatable ring around her, Batya feels compelled to take care of her. The little girl doesn't speak, and Batya can't give her to social services because it's the weekend and the agency is closed. So she takes her back to her apartment with the leaky roof, and when it comes time to work in the evening, she has to take the little girl with her. The boss is very unhappy about this and other shortcomings in Batya's work performance.

Another main character is Keren, who is getting married. At her wedding party (where Batya is of course working), she breaks her leg climbing out of a ladies' room cubicle whose door won't open, and so she and her new husband cannot take the Caribbean vacation they've planned. They end up in a dingy hotel on the seafront without a view. It smells bad, there is noise from the traffic, and Keren is complaining all the time. Her husband meets a strangely attractive older woman – a writer – who is also staying in the hotel, and Keren worries that he has slept with this stranger.

The third main character is a Filipino woman named Joy who looks after old people. The old woman she is hired to care for is very crabby and speaks no English, only German and Hebrew. Joy speaks English but no Hebrew or German. Joy is mostly concerned with how her son is doing back in the Philippines, and wants to buy him a toy boat, as he has asked. She finds the perfect boat in a store and plans to buy it. The daughter of the old woman, who hired Joy, is an actress appearing in some sort of post-modern "physical theater" adaptation of Hamlet, and does not get along with her mother.

The way in which these three stories—which intersect momentarily—resolve themselves is presumably supposed to mean something profound. I didn't get it. There is a fantasy element to Batya's relationship with the little girl, and maybe Batya's non-existent relationship with her parents is somehow inverted in this relationship. When Joy sees the toy boat in the shop window, there is a strange effect used where the little sails billow as if blown by the wind, and they do this as if they are on the scale of a real-life ship. Keren draws the outline of a bottle around a ship that is on a brochure cover in the hotel room, and a narration of the strange woman's poetry mentions a ship in a bottle. But what does all this mean? I thought about it for a while and realized I wasn't going to lose any sleep in the process. If anyone out there has a clear idea of what it's all about, maybe they can fill me in.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

Israel | France

Language:

Hebrew | English | Tagalog | German

Release Date:

28 June 2007 (Israel) See more »

Also Known As:

Les méduses See more »

Filming Locations:

Tel Aviv, Israel

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$25,352, 6 April 2008

Gross USA:

$341,221

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$938,881
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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