9.1/10
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The Tales of Ba Sing Se 

A series of short stories covering some of the time spent by Katara, Toph, Iroh, Sokka, Aang, Zuko and Momo as they live in Ba Sing Se.

Director:

Ethan Spaulding

Writers:

Michael Dante DiMartino (creator), Bryan Konietzko (creator) | 12 more credits »
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From $1.99 (SD) on Prime Video

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Zach Tyler ... Aang (voice) (as Zach Tyler Eisen)
Mae Whitman ... Katara (voice)
Jack De Sena ... Sokka (voice) (as Jack DeSena)
Jessie Flower ... Toph (voice)
Dante Basco ... Prince Zuko (voice)
Dee Bradley Baker ... Appa / Momo (voice)
Mako ... Uncle (voice)
Melinda Clarke ... Madame Macmu-Ling (voice)
Marcella Lentz-Pope ... Jin (voice) (as Marcella Lentz-Pop)
Andy Morris Andy Morris ... Kenji (voice)
Quinton Flynn ... Mugger (voice)
Greg Baldwin ... Additional Voices (voice)
Lizzie Murray Lizzie Murray ... Additional Voices (voice)
James Sie ... (voice)
Craig Strong Craig Strong ... Additional Voices (voice)
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Storyline

This episode focuses on the little events that each character does on his or her own in Ba Sing Se. It starts with Katara and Toph finally connecting with a girls' day out. Iroh helps different members of the community near his new home and ends his tale with a "special" picnic. Aang decides to help a zoo keeper with his animals. Sokka battles a poetry teacher in haiku in front of the all female class. Iroh accepts a date on Zuko's behalf. Zuko may have even enjoyed himself for once. And the tales end with Momo on a search for Appa, interrupted by a pack of stray cats that resemble tiny panthers. Written by LycoRogue

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Certificate:

TV-Y7 | See all certifications »
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Details

Release Date:

29 September 2006 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Uncle Iroh's tale concludes in honor of Mako, who passed away during the production of the second season. See more »

Goofs

When Iroh plays the song for the crying boy, he strums his instrument like a guitar. The instrument he plays, however, looks like a traditional Chinese instrument that is played upright while sitting down, and is essentially too heavy to be carried like a guitar. However, in the purely fictional world of Avatar, there are many things which would be impossible or "wrong" in our reality. In this specific case, just because the instrument looks like a certain real Chinese one, doesn't make it the same one, if only because China doesn't even exist in this fictional world. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Katara: Toph. Aren't you going to get ready for the day?
[Toph sits up in bed, spits into a spittoon, and stands up]
Toph: I'm ready.
Katara: You're not going to wash up? You've got a little dirt on your... everywhere, actually.
Toph: You call it dirt. I call it a healthy coating of earth.
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Connections

Referenced in Avatar Spirits (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Leaves from the Vine
Performed by Mako (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
Beautiful.
3 November 2018 | by tomatdotcomSee all my reviews

Every now and then, this show goes from being incredibly entertaining to truly special - and this episode is a definite example of that trend. My skepticism at what the writers could do with only five minutes apiece was quickly blown out of the water as I was reminded how exceptional each one of the characters are. Even Momo, arguably Ang's sidekick's sidekick, is more fully drawn and realised than some protagonists I've come across. But by far my favourite of the stories belongs to Iroh. His five minutes are some of the best I've ever experienced, a beautiful portrait of a complicated man that brought me to tears. You could come into this episode completely cold, knowing nothing about the show or its players and I'm still almost certain you would have the same reaction. That is the mark of excellent writing. And then, the touching goodbye to Mako right at the very end wrung just a little bit more out of me, a beautiful final punctuation for the most impactful piece of television I've seen in quite some time.

The haiku rap battle was fun too, I guess.


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