L'illusionniste (2010) - News Poster

News

Caleb's Cab: Sally and Sylvain Chomet interview

Aliya Whiteley Dec 15, 2016

Illustrated by the director of animated films Belleville Rendez-Vous & The Illusionist is Caleb's Cab, a children's book by Sally Chomet...

Caleb's Cab is the first book by Sally Chomet and it is a great story for children, creating an anarchic world in which Caleb, a young boy, must try to keep his mother out of debt after the mysterious disappearance of his father. He does this by taking over his father's job as a cab driver - but the cab turns out to not be your average car, and an entirely different world from the one Caleb knows awaits him.

See related Humans series 2 interview: Gemma Chan, Emily Berrington, Will Tudor Humans series 2 episode 7 review Humans series 2 episode 6 review Humans series 2 episode 5 review

The inventiveness of the two worlds Caleb finds himself straddling is a gift for reading aloud, and it's the kind of book that would
See full article at Den of Geek »

Chomet's "Thousand Miles" Begins Production

Chomet's
The Triplets of Belleville and "The Illusionist" director Sylvain Chomet has announced that he's begun production on "The Thousand Miles" at Savoy & Gregory. The project marks the multi-talented French filmmaker's long-awaited return to the animated genre which he previously tackled in 2003 and 2010.

Effectively the helmer's English-language debut, dialogue plays a large part in 'Miles' unlike his previous two animated films. Newcomer James Lipsius along with two iconic American actors with Italian roots will voice the lead characters in a film said to be primarily inspired by the dream journals of iconic Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini.

Set in an early 1980s Italy, the story follows two ageing brothers who, separated by life, reunite through their shared life-dream to compete in Italy's Mille Miglia vintage car rally - the world's most beautiful road race. What follows is a metaphysical journey filled with love, laughter and sorrow.

Though entirely in 2D hand-drawn animation, the
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Edinburgh chair Bob Last quits ahead of film festival

  • ScreenDaily
Move comes less than two weeks before the start of the festival.

Bob Last, the chair of the Edinburgh International Film Festival (Eiff) has stepped down less than two weeks before the start of this year’s event, which runs June 17-28.

The chairman of the Centre for the Moving Image, which oversees the operation of Eiff, will stand down with immediate effect.

The recruitment process for a new chair has now begun.

Last’s resignation comes just three months after Mark Adams began his role as Eiff artistic director, replacing Chris Fujiwara who stood down in September.

Last, a producer who has worked on films including Terence DaviesSunset Song and Sylvain Chomet’s The Illusionist, had been in the post since November 2012.

He said: “It’s been an honour and a pleasure to chair the Cmi. We have made huge strides in developing the business, including raising the profile and standing of Eiff. I wish Ken Hay
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Watch Sylvain Chomet’s beautiful animated video for Stromae’s “Carmen”

Sylvain Chomet, the director of several beautiful animated films including The Triplets of Belleville and The Illusionist, has unveiled his music video for Belgian singer and songwriter Stromae’s “Carmen.” The video style, which is everything you would come to expect from the Academy Award nominated director, draws on the 1800s opera by French composer Georges Bizet, and features an animated Stromae being consumed by his Twitter addiction. Premiering on Buzzfeed, the video garnered over five million views in less than 24 hours.

In the past five years, the 29-year-old discovery has become a sensation across the Atlantic, beginning with his song “Alors on danse”, which became number one in several European countries. The Belgian rapper is redefining what it means to be a contemporary male pop star, and much like Michael Jackson in the early 80’s, he’s using the visual medium to further thrust him into the spotlight. Check out the video below,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Rwandan-Belgian Musician Stromae Critiques Social Media Culture in New Video Directed by Sylvain Chomet ('Triplets of Belleville')

I'd never heard of Rwandan-Flemish singer/rapper Stromae until today, thanks to this new music video that landed on my virtual desk this morning, directed by acclaimed French animator Sylvain Chomet (of "Triplets of Belleville" and "The Illusionist" fame). The video, which is very much in Chomet's visual style, is for a track by Stromae titled "Carmen" (borrowing from Georges Bizet’s well-known opera) that's actually been out for a little while, as I discovered. But Chomet's delightful video, released just today, helps bring to visual life the song's criticisms of disposable social media culture. It...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

DVD Review: 'Attila Marcel'

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ Sylvain Chomet's feature-length foray into live action, Attila Marcel (2013) sees him making stylistic nods to the auteurs of his homeland - think Tati, Jeunet and Gondry - while maintaining his own sense of whimsical tenacity that has become a hallmark of his trade. Chomet has made a name for himself in constructing animated worlds that hearken back to the glory days of cartoonish delight. Indeed, his previous works, The Triplets of Belleville (2003) and The Illusionist (2010), have been praised for their surreal charms and comforting qualities. But while Attila Marcel is altogether a saccharine diversion, it fumbles with tone and direction.
See full article at CineVue »

Sylvain Chomet's 'The Old Lady and the Pigeons'

yt id="MqhVcRrrauY" width="500" Directed by Sylvain Chomet (The Triplets of Belleville, The Illusionist), below is his 1997 short film The Old Lady and the Pigeons (La Vieille Dame et les Pigeons), which was nominated for an Oscar for Best Animated Short Film. It lost the award to Pixar's Geri's Game (included below). An emaciated Parisian policeman discovers an old lady who feeds pigeons in the park excessively. After having a nightmare ending in giant pigeon-men pecking at his stomach, the policeman constructs a pigeon mask, which he wears to the old lady's home. She welcomes him inside and, despite his rude behavior, allows him to gorge himself. As weeks pass, the policeman grows increasingly fat. As he goes up flights of stairs to the woman's home each day, he passes a maid sweeping the floor. Eventually, the policeman discovers the old lady's other pet: the woman who swept the floor,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Watch: 'The Triplets Of Belleville' Filmmaker Sylvain Chomet's Debut, Oscar-Nominated Short 'The Old Lady And The Pigeons'

Sylvain Chomet's beautiful, distinct animated films take time to make. It was seven years between his feature film debut "The Triplets Of Belleville" and "The Illusionist," and while he did most recently knock out the live action "Attila Marcel," he's got another animated feature cooking with "Ten Thousand Miles." But right from the start, Chomet's talent and style made itself known with the short "The Old Lady And The Pigeons." Kicking off Chomet's career, this 22-minute 1997 short tells the quirky story of a skinny, starving French policeman who dresses up as a pigeon and forces an old lady to feed him. And things get weirder from there as he keeps returning to the old woman's house and ballooning in size. And yet, even in this surreal tale, Chomet's unique visuals are impressive. So much so, that the short won a nice handful of awards around the world, and was
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: Trailer For 'Atilla Marcel,' From 'Triplets Of Belleville' Director Sylvain Chomet

French director Sylvain Chomet, best known for his animated films “Belleville Rendezvous” (a.k.a. “The Triplets of Belleville”) and “The Illusionist,” is set to premiere his first live-action feature in the U.K. next week. Though French trailers for the film have been circulating since last year, the English version has just recently been released at the 11th hour (we’re optimistic that’s not a bad sign, though). Here’s the official synopsis: Paul is in his thirties and lives in a Paris apartment with his aunts, a pair of elderly aristocrats who have raised him since the age of two, and who dream of him becoming a piano virtuoso. His life boils down to a daily routine spent at the grand piano in the salon, and his aunts’ dance classes where he works as an accompanist. Cut off from the outside world, Paul has grown old without ever having lived.
See full article at The Playlist »

Attila Marcel Review

  • HeyUGuys
French director Sylvain Chomet has an incredible four Academy Award nominations to his name, renowned for his distinguishable, ingenious animations such as The Triplets of Belleville, and The Illusionist. He now returns with his very first live action feature with Attila Marcel, remaining faithful to his own brand, bringing that sense of enchantment and striking, vibrant visual experience to the viewer, as you feel that every single object, or colour implemented, has been done so meticulously, for a certain, desired effect.

Another similarity comes in the form of a silent protagonist, which had served Chomet’s preceding endeavour so well. This time the character is Paul (Guillaume Gouix), a piano virtuoso, who has never once spoken a word following the untimely, mysterious death of his parents when he was just a toddler. Now, living with his two eccentric aunts, he becomes spiritually entwined with his next door neighbour Madame Proust (Anne Le Ny), who,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

'Crouching Tiger,' 'Howards End,' 'Talk to Her': the best of Sony Pictures Classics

  • Hitfix
Sony Pictures Classics honchos Michael Barker and Tom Bernard have been feted up one side and down the other lately. The duo celebrated 20 years of Spc in 2012 and have received awards from the Museum of the Moving Image and the Gotham Awards as of late. Tonight they will receive the Los Angeles Film Festival's Spirit of Independence Award as the love keeps pouring in. Given that we recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of Fox Searchlight — another crucial entity in the indie film space — it seemed like we were over due for a similar appreciation of Sony Classics' 22 years of output. The interesting thing, though, is that unlike Searchlight, there isn't necessarily anything outwardly identifiable about Sony Classics films as, well, "Sony Classics films." They all have a strong whiff of good taste but they don't have the heavy marketing footprint of some of the studio's contemporaries. Barker and Bernard's cinephile passion is always evident,
See full article at Hitfix »

Video of the Day: Watch Sylvain Chomet do an animated couch gag for The Simpsons

One of the most enduring aspects of the long-running animated show The Simpsons has been the couch gag that is present in the opening titles of every episode. Over the years, numerous artists have been tapped to create couch gags, including the elusive street artist Banksy. The newest artist to lend their talents to the show is French filmmaker Sylvain Chomet. Known for the animated features The Triplets of Belleville and The Illusionist, Chomet’s couch gag will be featured in the upcoming episode of The Simpsons. The bit has also been released online ahead of its airing, and can be seen below.

****

(Source: Animation Scoop)

The post Video of the Day: Watch Sylvain Chomet do an animated couch gag for The Simpsons appeared first on Sound On Sight.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: New Awesome 'Simpsons' Couch Gag, Plus: Disney's 'Where the Wild Things Are' Test Animation

If you like your movies and TV shows drawn as opposed to filled with flesh-and-blood humans, these two stories will make your Friday. After 20-plus seasons on the air, you have to wonder if Matt Groening and crew ever feel like they’ve run out of funny couch gags to open each episode of The Simpsons. We don’t know if they have, but this Sunday’s episode hands the reins over to French animator Sylvain Chomet, who's crafted what some are calling the best opening couch sequence ever. Chomet -- who is best known for The Triplets of Belleville and The Illusionist – brings his signature style and French sensibilities to the Simpson clan. Watch as Homer snacks on snails, Bart tries to make his own goose-liver pate, and Marge launches a fruitless search for...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Watch Sylvain Chomet's 'The Simpsons' Couch Gag

This is great, Sylvain Chomet (The Triplets of Belleville, The Illusionist) gives us his version of "The Simpsons" couch gag seen before each of the show's episodes in a myriad of forms with guest segments bright to life by the likes of Banksy, Guillermo del Toro and others recently. This might be my favorite yet. Give it a watch below. yt id="AOi5OF7gAiM" width="500"
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

The Simpsons' couch gag gets a Gallic makeover by Sylvain Chomet

The famous credits gag is given a whimsical French tinge by Triplets of Belleville director Chomet, following another recent version by Guillermo Del Toro

• My favourite TV show: The Simpsons

The couch sequence on the Simpsons is one of the most reliable and comforting introductions on TV – always different and yet somehow always the same, as the family skitter in to some kind of surreal sight gag. But after well over 500 episodes, the producers are starting to farm the gag out elsewhere.

Recently we had Guillermo Del Toro's horror-filled take, and a Hobbit-themed epic, but now things get a little more whimsical and low-key. French animator Sylvain Chomet, director of The Triplets of Belleville and The Illusionist, takes the reins which a knowingly Gallic sequence: Homer eats snails, Bart attempts to make foie gras, and Maggie goes missing in typically slapstick fashion. Take a look at the clip below,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Simpsons' couch gag gets a Gallic makeover by Sylvain Chomet

The famous credits gag is given a whimsical French tinge by Triplets of Belleville director Chomet, following another recent version by Guillermo Del Toro

• My favourite TV show: The Simpsons

The couch sequence on the Simpsons is one of the most reliable and comforting introductions on TV – always different and yet somehow always the same, as the family skitter in to some kind of surreal sight gag. But after well over 500 episodes, the producers are starting to farm the gag out elsewhere.

Recently we had Guillermo Del Toro's horror-filled take, and a Hobbit-themed epic, but now things get a little more whimsical and low-key. French animator Sylvain Chomet, director of The Triplets of Belleville and The Illusionist, takes the reins which a knowingly Gallic sequence: Homer eats snails, Bart attempts to make foie gras, and Maggie goes missing in typically slapstick fashion. Take a look at the clip below,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Here's Sylvain Chomet's couch gag for The Simpsons

Viral Video Ryan Lambie 7 Mar 2014 - 12:37

French animator Sylvain Chomet provides a superb couch gag for The Simpsons. Take a look within...

The opening 'couch gag' sequences have become one of the most surprising and creative aspects of The Simpsons - last year saw a great nod to Guillermo del Toro in a Treehouse Of Terror couch gag, while the work of Studio Ghibli was honoured in this fabulous extended sequence. 

French animator Sylvain Chomet has lent his personal and very distinctive touch to a new opening, which you can see below. If you've watched and admired such films as Belleville Rendezvous and The Illusionist, as we have, you'll immediately recognise his particular style of animation. We particularly like all the French stereotypes he's managed to shoehorn into its 60 seconds of expressive movement - Diy Duck Liver Pate kit, anyone?

Live For Films

Follow our Twitter feed for faster
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 2010

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 27 Feb 2014 - 05:54

Our series of lists devoted to underappreciated films brings us to the year 2010, and another 25 overlooked gems...

By 2010, Hollywood’s obsession with 3D movies was in full swing. James Cameron’s Avatar may have given audiences a taste of what the cutting edge of stereoscope could look like, but it has to be said that the movies ushered into cinemas in its wake were a decidedly mixed bunch. Toy Story 3's 3D was extraordinarily effective, yet Clash Of The Titans looked like a blurry mess. How To Train Your Dragon came to life in its flying sequences, but the less said about the horribly murky Last Airbender, the better.

Unless we’re mistaken, none of the movies on this list were shot or released in 3D, and few of them did particularly stellar business. A few got a certain amount of critical acclaim,
See full article at Den of Geek »

French Film Festival unveils final line-up

Hélène Vincent, Guillaume Gouix, and Bernadette Lafont in Attila Marcel French filmmaker Sylvain Chomet will return to the French Film Festival UK this year with his first full foray into live action Attila Marcel, which has been selected as the opening gala film.

Chomet - who spent five years in Scotland making the animated hit The Illusionist - will attend the film's premieres in London, Edinburgh and Glasgow to help kick off the 21st edition of the UK touring event that was founded in Scotland. He expects to be accompanied by his producer Claudie Ossard who has been responsible for some of France’s biggest hits of recent decades, including Amelie, Delicatessen and In The House.

The title of Attila Marcel comes from a song Chomet wrote for his first big hit Belleville Rendez-vous. He said: “I had the title and I knew it was going to be a film
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed