An alien civilization is invaded by Astronaut Chuck Baker, who believes that the planet was uninhabited. Wanted by the military, Baker must get back to his ship before it goes into orbit without him.

Directors:

Jorge Blanco, Javier Abad (co-director) | 1 more credit »

Writers:

Joe Stillman (script by), Javier Abad (original idea by) | 3 more credits »
4 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dwayne Johnson ... Captain Charles T. Baker (voice)
Jessica Biel ... Neera (voice)
Justin Long ... Lem (voice)
Gary Oldman ... General Grawl (voice)
Seann William Scott ... Skiff (voice)
John Cleese ... Professor Kipple (voice)
Freddie Benedict Freddie Benedict ... Eckle (voice)
Alan Marriott ... Glar (voice)
Mathew Horne ... Soldier Vesklin (voice)
James Corden ... Soldier Vernkot (voice)
Lewis Macleod ... Additional Voices (voice)
Emma Tate Emma Tate ... Additional Voices (voice)
Rupert Degas ... Additional Voices (voice)
Pete Atkin Pete Atkin ... Additional Voices (voice)
Rebecca Front ... Additional Voices (voice)
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Storyline

Lem is just an average teenager working on getting the girl and furthering his career at the local planetarium - except that he's an alien. At least to U.S. astronaut Captain Charles T. Baker who lands on Lem's planet hoping for a quick flag plant and a hasty return to earth and his millions of screaming fans. But on this alien planet the media has tagged spacemen as brain-eating, zombie-creating monsters, causing Baker to run for his life and into Lem's house. Now it's up to the green native to get the clumsy astronaut back to his spaceship before military dictator General Grawl and mad scientist Professor Kipple manage to exterminate the Earthly visitor. Written by The Massie Twins

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Something strange is coming to their planet...Us! See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild sci-fi action and some suggestive humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Even though much on the alien planet is round in design, nothing has wheels. Aztecs were one of the few ancient civilizations that hypothesized about alien life, and never used wheels. See more »

Goofs

In every instance except one, the city/town is spelled "Glipforg". On the hardware store sign, it's spelled "Glipfrog". See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
girl: I've never gone parking before. I'm really not that kind of a girl.
boy: Well, I'm not the kind of a guy who would go with *that* kind of girl.
girl: Why that's so sweet - I think.
boy: There's nothing to be scared of.
[as alien craft rears up in front of them]
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Crazy Credits

There is an additional scene halfway through the end credits. See more »

Connections

References Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Stick It to the Man (End Credits Version)
Written by Tom Cawte
Performed by Tom Cawte and The Electric Hearts
Produced by Graham Walker
© 2009 Handmade Films Music Ltd
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User Reviews

 
Mild humor, nothing offensive, certainly nothing memorable
22 November 2009 | by RichardSRussell-1See all my reviews

Planet 51 (1:31, PG) — SF, 2nd string, original

Let us enumerate the other movies which this one rips off (or, if you wish, to which it pays homage): 2001, Alien, The Day the Earth Stood Still, ET, The Right Stuff, Singin' in the Rain, Star Wars, Terminator, and WALL•E. Even the inexplicable rain (rocks) is evocative of Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs.

The overall theme — alien race in the foreground with humans as the bad guys — has likewise been done in Battle for Terra, The Tale of Despereaux, James Cameron's long-in- production Avatar, and sort of in District 9 and Delgo.

But you know what they say: If you copy from only 1 source, it's a ripoff; 2 is plagiarism; 3 is research; 4 or more is scholarship and will likely lead to tenure. Besides, the target audience is too young to have seen almost any of those other movies, and the writer (Joe Stillman) must have figured he needed to put something in for the parents.

The nostril-less green-skinned natives of Planet 51 don't call it that, of course. To them, it's just "the world", part of a universe that may be as much as 500 miles across, with thousands of stars. This pathetic naivete has not kept them from discovering anti-gravity, however, but it seems that they never figured out how to apply it to anything besides cars. Similarly, they may be aware of design forms other than the sphere, but it seems not to have occurred to them to use anything else. These oddities aside, their world looks a whole lot like Eisenhower-era America, complete with white picket fences, B&W TV, and alien-invasion movies.

Rocketing down into this peaceful scene comes a LEM (lunar excursion module), piloted by Capt. Charles T. "Chuck" Baker (Dwayne Johnson). It lands on the front lawn of one of the globular homes, and Baker strides out of it to plant the US flag on the sidewalk, apparently totally oblivious to his surroundings. The natives finally close their mouths and go into hysterics. Chuck flees.

The main viewpoint character is Lem (heh, get it?), a junior assistant curator at the local planetarium (voiced by Justin Long, who you just kept waiting to say "I'm a Mac."). He's got the hots for the GND, Neera (Jessica Biel), but has been too shy to make a move. She gets put off when it appears that he's anti-alien, but in fact he's just acting that way as he tries to provide Chuck with a hideout preparatory to getting his spaceship back.

The military under Gen. Grawl (Gary Oldman) shows up and behaves as it did in TDTESS. Among the grunts are stock Rosencrantz and Guildenstern figures, apparently to provide comic relief in what was ostensibly a comedy to begin with.

This all takes place in the town of Glipforg, and I spent way too much time during the show trying to figure out what it must be an anagram for. (Frogglip, which describes Neera?)

We know from Monsters Inc. that it's fiendishly difficult to animate hair and fur. If you recall Up, you may have been among the 2% of the audience that noticed Carl growing a very fine, sparse gray stubble over the course of his adventure. This is the sort of thing that nobody would have noticed if it had been absent, but the Pixar guys threw it in anyway, because they're Pixar. Ilion Animation, the Spanish firm behind Planet 51, not only didn't go that far, they decided to skip the hair thing altogether and went with banana dreads for the natives.

OK, so I've already rattled off lack of originality, inconsistent technology, gratuitous distractions, and corner-cutting animation. Why then do I rate this flik as high as "average"? Because the animation was good enuf for the quality of the film, the story was good- natured, there were several smiley moments (tho no out-loud laffs), and it's hard to get too down on any movie where a jostled iPod starts playing "Macarena" and the general exclaims "I've never seen such a heinous weapon.".


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Details

Country:

Spain | UK | USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

20 November 2009 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Planet 51 See more »

Filming Locations:

Kingman, Arizona, USA

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Box Office

Budget:

$70,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$12,286,129, 22 November 2009

Gross USA:

$42,194,060

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$105,647,102
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS (Digital DTS Sound)| SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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