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"The X-Files" Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose (TV Episode 1995) Poster

Trivia

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In this episode Clyde Bruckman is going through evidence trying to get psychic visions, and when he is holding a blue piece of cloth he says, "I got it! This is yours. This is from your New York Knicks t-shirt!" He was wrong, however in The X-Files: Beyond the Sea (1994) Luther Lee Boggs gets a psychic vision from a similar blue piece of cloth, and Mulder says "I tore this off my New York Knicks t-shirt. It has nothing to do with the crime."
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There is a scene where Clyde Bruckman is playing cards with Scully. The camera briefly shows his cards - the two black aces and the ace of hearts, and the two black eights. That hand is a variation on the so-called Dead Man's Hand that Wild Bill Hickok was holding when he was shot in the back of the head in 1876 while playing poker. Four of the five cards in Hickok's hand were the two black aces and the two black eights.
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Each of the winning lottery numbers announced on the radio are one number off of the numbers on Clyde Bruckman's ticket.
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It won 2 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series - Peter Boyle and Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series.
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Peter Boyle's character has the same name as a famous Hollywood writer and director of the 1920s-1940s, Clyde Bruckman, who worked with many of the famous comedians of the day including Buster Keaton, W.C. Fields, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. He later fell on hard times and committed suicide in 1955.
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The victim found in the mud was named Claude Dukenfield, which is the original middle and last name of W.C. Fields.
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It was neither Tommy Allsup nor the The Big Bopper who won the coin toss in 1959. It was in fact 17-year-old Ritchie Valens. Allsup lost the toss, and had to ride the bus.
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Queequeg, Scully's adopted Pomeranian, is named for the tattooed harpooner in "Moby Dick."
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The names of characters Detective Havez and Detective Cline are also references to a writer and director from the silent film era, Jean C. Havez and Edward F. Cline.
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The killer in the episode is played by Stuart Charno, husband of Sara B. Cooper who wrote the Season 2 episode, The X-Files: Aubrey (1995)
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The name of the character played by Peter Boyle is the same as that of the co-writer/co-director of the Buster Keaton silent classic, The General (1926). According to his IMDb filmography, the original Clyde Bruckman (1894-1955) was a prolific screen writer and director whose career spanned over 3 decades from 1919 onwards.
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The role of Clyde Bruckman was originally written with Bob Newhart in mind.
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In 1997, the TV Guide ranked this episode number 10 on its "100 Greatest Episodes of All Time" list.
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Series regular David Duchovny previously played husband to Patricia Heaton in the movie Beethoven (1992) and guest star Peter Boyle later played father-in-law to Heaton on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond (1996).
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

This episode starts the legend among some fans that says Scully is not going to die, after Clyde Bruckman tells her she won't die. Later in The X-Files: Tithonus (1999), a man who cannot die exchanges Scully's death for his.
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Pay close attention when Scully scans the crowds at the murder scenes. The killer appears in the crowd each time, except when the police are investigating the final psychic murder. In that scene, Scully is holding the tarot card picturing the bellhop as she pulls aside the curtain to scan the crowd, so even though the killer is absent, he is still represented in the shot.
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The character Clyde Bruckman claims he got his abilities from thinking too much about a coin toss taking place between The Big Bopper Richardson and Ritchie Valens, which got Richardson his place next to Buddy Holly on the plane that crashed, causing both of their deaths. In fact, it was Valens, not Richardson (nor Allsup) who won his seat in a coin toss. Richardson got his seat because he had the flu due to the busted heating on the tour bus that lead to them chartering the plane in the first place.
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The first time we meet Queequeg, the dog that Scully ends up adopting.
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Agent Scully's Pomeranian dog, "Queequeg", is named for the harpooner in "Moby Dick." There are some parallels with the dog and the person in Melville's book. a) Scully & Ishmael accepted something heinous about their respective Queequeg. Scully's dog was caught eating his dead previous owner. Ishmael's killed whales b) both were the best friend of their Queequeg and c) both died and were dragged down into the murky deep water by a creature. It would be a crocodile that kills the little dog, returning to the boggy land; Ishmael's friend dies in a coffin and goes down with the their ship "Pequod".
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