Welcome Back, Kotter (1975–1979)
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There's No Business: Part 2 

Kotter is a success at being a comedian but it is putting a strain on his marriage and his relationship with the Sweathogs. Second of a two-part episode.

Director:

Bob Claver

Writers:

Gabe Kaplan (created by) (as Gabriel Kaplan), Gabe Kaplan (creator) (as Gabriel Kaplan) | 6 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Gabe Kaplan ... Gabe Kotter (as Gabriel Kaplan)
Marcia Strassman ... Julie Kotter
John Sylvester White ... Mr. Michael Woodman
Robert Hegyes ... Juan Epstein
Lawrence-Hilton Jacobs ... Freddie 'Boom Boom' Washington
Ron Palillo ... Arnold Horshack
John Travolta ... Vinnie Barbarino
Melonie Haller Melonie Haller ... Angie Grabowski
Sam Weisman ... Peter Charnoff
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Storyline

Kotter is a success at being a comedian but it is putting a strain on his marriage and his relationship with the Sweathogs. Second of a two-part episode.

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Genres:

Comedy

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 February 1978 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Goodbye teaching, hello show business
3 July 2016 | by kevinolzakSee all my reviews

"There's No Business" concludes with the Sweathogs stunned to have Kotter about to embark on a show business career that will leave them behind. Gabe's agent Peter Charnoff (Sam Weisman) reports that the upcoming 32 week tour ups the ante to $600 a week. On the verge of sealing the deal, Kotter receives an unexpected visit from Mr. Woodman, reporting how the Sweathogs have given up: "they're like extras in a zombie movie!" With his dream of fame and fortune so close to reality, Gabe lets his heart do the talking during his farewell performance, and returns to the classroom to do what he was born to do. Woodman welcomes him back with typical aplomb: "your dream is over, you better get back to your nightmare!"


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