"The Twilight Zone" The Night of the Meek (TV Episode 1960) Poster

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1/10
I would rather eat my own eyes than watch this episode again!!
MartinHafer9 September 2007
Art Carney plays a skid row bum who is dressed like Santa but is much more like Billy Bob Thornton in BAD SANTA. Carney's Santa is a pathetic drunk and someone that most children would be scared to death to see appear in their homes on Christmas morning.

This is, without a doubt, the most god-awful episode of TWILIGHT ZONE ever made. Not only is it made on video (which is shot like a live episode and looks very grainy), but the basic plot is just too schmaltzy and annoying to even be considered a part of the TWILIGHT ZONE series. In style, writing and watchability, it fails on every level and is an episode I make efforts to avoid seeing again. There is not twist, no irony, nothing--just dull sentimentality--something that the series was NOT usually a victim of and which suits it very poorly.
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8/10
A bag that keeps on giving
bkoganbing2 October 2013
It's possible that the Santa Clause movies with Tim Allen might have originated with this Twilight Zone episode that starred Art Carney. Not as funny in terms of belly laughs as the Santa Clause movies, but it does have a lot of whimsy and pathos involved. The kind of story that someone like Charlie Chaplin might have done for a silent screen short subject.

Art Carney is an alcoholic man who works hard at not working most of the year, but at Christmas time is a department store Santa Claus for John Fiedler. But when he arrives with a snootful, Carney gets canned.

At his lowest moment Carney stumbles over a burlap bag that is filled with wrapped presents that doesn't seem to run out. He sobers up instantly and gets high on giving. At the end you have to remember the Santa Clause films to know Carney has truly entered The Twilight Zone.
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10/10
Should be Shown Every Christmas
Hitchcoc14 November 2008
I count Art Carney among America's great comedic actors. There is a beauty and kindness in this script, but also a very hard edge. Carney plays a sad, alcoholic department store Santa Claus who sees his job as a hopeless one. He drinks too much and tires of the grasping children who sit on his lap with their over-indulgent parents. The kids he loves are the ones on the street who have the real problems, whose parents are out of work, who have nothing at Christmas time. HIs boss fires him after he expresses his feelings, and as he makes his way home, he spots a bag of garbage and tin cans. Suddenly, the bag is transformed into a sack full of presents, presents that are perfect for anyone that comes along. The police call the store manager who accuses him of stealing the gifts. But love wins out and the spirit of Christmas.

One of the characters is played by Bert Mustin, who played many old men, including Gus, the fireman, on Leave It to Beaver. He had a real kindness. Carney is awesome in this very touching role. See this if you can.
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8/10
Santa Claus
claudio_carvalho26 May 2018
The unemployed drunkard Henry Corwin has been hired by a department store for a temporary work as Santa Claus. During his leisure period, he drinks too much and is fired by the manager. While walking back home, Henry finds a bag of gifts and fulfills his dream of providing Christmas gifts to his neighborhood. Who is the owner of the magic bag?

"The Night of the Meek" is a beautiful Christmas tale with the story of a man with big heart that understands his needy neighborhood. The conclusion is poignant. My vote is eight.

Title (Brazil): "A Noite dos Humildes" ("The Night of the Meek")
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10/10
There's hope somewhere in the Twilight Zone.
mark.waltz20 April 2019
Warning: Spoilers
The wonderful Art Carney gives much depth to the character of a drunken Santa in this classic Christmas episode of "The Twilight Zone" that is sure to pull the heartstrings as well as Santa's sleigh. a gentleman of the old school, Carney has sunken into drunken depravity, only working as a department store Santa during the holiday season, and snapping as he sees the old world changing around him.

This isn't accepting of Carney's character of a drunkard, and certainly doesn't make excuses, but does its best to show what has led to his current situation. He's disgusted by the lack of love of fellow man in his society and the rudeness in which human beings treat each other year round. he despairs over the poor children in his neighborhood who have no dreams come true on Christmas Eve and desperately wishes he could be the one to give them a Christmas they won't forget. That miracle occurs when he finds a supposed bag of trash in an alley which turns out to be filled with goodies for both needy children and needy adults alike. But when the local law suspect him of having swiped these presents, he is dragged down to headquarters where surprising changes occur, leading to a twist that is sure to put the Christmas spirit in your heart it regardless of what time of year you watch it.

Familiar character actors like John Fiedler (as the pompous, uncaring department store manager, Meg Wyllie as a judgmental Salvation Army worker and Burt Mustin as an elderly man who provides Carney with the desire to continue the way he cares about the down and out add depth and detail two-way unique entry in the Twilight Zone series. For those of us who watch the series all the way through consecutively, this is the one episode to pull out and watch annually over the holiday season to remind us of the humanity deep inside all of us are regardless of how pathetic or down and out we seem. It truly is a Christmas classic, as well as one of the best episodes that "The Twilight Zone" ever put out.
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7/10
"Seems to me the essence of our problem is that we're dealing with a most unusual bag".
classicsoncall13 April 2010
Warning: Spoilers
You don't get a chance to see Art Carney in a role like this too often. In fact the role of Santa Claus here might have been more appropriate for his Honeymooner sidekick Jackie Gleason. Strictly speaking girth of course, but all in all, I'd have to say Carney filled out the big red suit quite nicely. Even with the cheap production values and the shabby set design, there's a richness of character that shows through his performance, pointing to the true meaning of Christmas in a way that contemporary shows often need a couple of hours to get to. You know he means it when his character Henry Corwin states "Just on one Christmas, I'd like to see the meek inherit the Earth". Art Carney was certainly an original, and if I had to guess, he's spent every Christmas since his death in 2003 handing out gifts in heaven to children who might have joined him much too early. Watching this one will put a twinkle in your eye and a lump in your throat.
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9/10
Poignant Christmas episode
Woodyanders22 August 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Disillusioned alcoholic Henry Colvin (marvelously played with endearing sincerity by Art Carney) gets fired from his job as a department store Santa. However, Henry finds a mysterious magical bag that enables him to give presents to the poor and needy on Christmas Eve.

Director Jack Smight relates the moving story at a steady pace and ably crafts a pleasant noel atmosphere. Rod Serling's sweet script astutely captures the warmth of generosity of the yuletide season. Moreover, Carney shines in his meaty lead role (his monologue on precisely why he's a drunk is beautifully rendered); he receives sturdy support from John Fiedler as fed-up boss Mr. Dunne, Robert P. Lieb as hearty cop Flaherty, Burt Mustin as a kindly old man, Meg Wyllie as the skeptical Sister Florence, and Val Avery as a cynical bartender. Shot on videotape, this episode has the raw energy and immediacy of a live television broadcast. A lovely and moving show.
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10/10
The Night of the Meek was an excellent Christmas episode of "The Twilight Zone"
tavm2 December 2008
This is my fourth consecutive comment on a Rod Serling-related project and my first this month of December on a Christmas-related one. Having never seen this particular episode when "The Twilight Zone" was airing on Superstation WGN-TV in Chicago on cable during the '80s, I was ecstatic when I found this on joust.com as linked by Google Video. One of six episodes shot on videotape, Art Carney is Henry Corwin, a drunkard who arrives late and inebriated at his job of a department store Santa. When one parent in particular complains, the manager (John Fielder) fires him on the spot but not until Henry expresses his wish to help less fortunate folks, as opposed to the arrogant and spoiled ones in the store, does he leave. Outside as he stumbles into his alley, a cat drops a big bag down in front of him. When he comes to the church of salvation, all the poor souls there miraculously get whatever presents they wanted from that bag (one of those souls is played by Burt Mustin, who I remembered from a couple episodes of "All in the Family"). The organ playing woman there does not approve and gets a cop who takes him in. At the station, Henry's former manager tries to take back what he thinks are his store's stolen goods but sees nothing but tin cans and thinks the cop wasted his time bringing him there. But when Corwin reaches back in the bag, he presents his ex-boss with a bottle of a certain vintage wine that he wished for. I'll stop there and mention how wonderful to discover another great Art Carney performance after years of seeing him as Norton in "The Honeymooners" as well as his Oscar-winning turn in Harry and Tonto. He brings such belief and optimism to his role that when the whimsical turn of events come at the end, you can't help but be happy for him. Not a typical "Twilight Zone" episode, that's for sure, but one worth seeing for anyone who loves the Christmas spirit.
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5/10
Supernatural/Sentimental Christmases aren't my thing
Coventry3 April 2018
I love Holiday Horror, and I was quite ecstatic when first noticing that a Christmas-themed episode was part of the second season of the almighty series "The Twilight Zone". But then, just as quickly, I immediately lowered my expectations because I had a feeling this wouldn't revolve on maniacal killers in a Santa suit or eerie little monsters crawling out of the Christmas tree. I was pretty sure that Rod Serling, clever crowd-pleaser that he is, would use this episode as an opportunity to capture the true spirit of Christmas and narrate a sentimental tale with a dreamy climax. And guess what, that's exactly what happened! Art Carney gives a solid performance as a chronic drunkard who can't even remain sober during the one period of the year when he works, namely as Santa in a popular supermarket. He gets fired after shouting at a selfish and spoiled kid, but then finds a magical bag on the street that allows for him to really become Santa Clause and bring happiness to the people who truly deserve it. Now, sentimental TZ-episodes certainly aren't my favorite kind, but I know this tale has a lot of devoted fans, so I'm sure it's great. Carney gives an admirable performance and Jack Smight was one of the first and sole directors to experiment with shot-on-video episodes of the show, but the results aren't very successful.
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9/10
That's why I drink - and that's why I weep.
hitchcockthelegend27 December 2015
Christmas comes to The Twilight Zone in this super episode that stars Art Carney as Henry Corwin, an alcoholic department store Santa Claus. Getting fired for his drinking, Corwin is bewildered when he finds what appears to be a magic sack that distributes the exact presents requested by Corwin's friends and the neighbourhood children. But this is just the start of things...

One of the episodes that was filmed on videotape, Night of the Meek is kept to a production value minimum. Yet it really doesn't matter, the feel of a snowy Christmas comes alive as Corwin stumbles and trudges through this little part of Americana. The story is a perfect blend of comedy and drama, with Rod Serling sprinkling his magical whimsy into the pudding mix. And of course we are being led by our hearts to a glorious finale, for this is when the title comes to make sense.

With Carney giving a magnetic two-fold performance to seal the deal, this really should be on everyone's annual Xmas viewings list. 9/10
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7/10
"Santa's loaded"
Calicodreamin4 June 2021
I kept waiting for the tragic twilight twist but was pleasantly surprised. Solid storyline and a wholesome message. Acting was decent as well.
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2/10
Weak.
bombersflyup30 August 2019
Warning: Spoilers
The Night of the Meek is pointless and unenjoyable. It's a rags to riches story or a gift that keeps on giving... I could probably go on, but I'm done.
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8/10
Santa Claus Arrives
AaronCapenBanner26 October 2014
Art Carney plays alcoholic Henry Corwin, who has just been hired and fired as a department store Santa Claus after reporting to duty drunk and despondent about the poor living conditions in his neighborhood, especially concerning the children and the holiday season. Henry will get his wish of being Santa Claus when a mysterious and seemingly magic bag appears, enabling him to give out lots of presents, though his former boss Mr. Dundee(played by John Fiedler) still wants him put in jail... Though videotaped, this doesn't mar it too much, and remains a heartwarming modern fable of a flawed but good man given his greatest wish at Christmas.
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9/10
A charming Christmas episode - it ain't Nackles
safenoe7 October 2016
Warning: Spoilers
What a lovely and feel-good Twilight Zone episode, one of five filmed in videotape. Art Carney is brilliant in the role where he inadvertently becomes Santa Claus and brings cheers to lots of people who need it most. The ending is very touching and a relief from the usual episodes where a gray suited guy reminisces about his childhood at a merry-go-round, and ends up throwing himself off a train carriage. Oh dear. It's a different from the usual episodes where a lost astronaut screams "Where/Who/What am I??????!!!!!", then realizing he's on the edge of a Vegas suburb.

Over 20 years later the 80s revival of The Twilight Zone was embroiled in controversy with the halting of the production Nackles, the anti- Santa Claus.
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10/10
Christmas For All Time Forever Meek
DKosty1237 December 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Rod Serling by 1960 had been cranking out scripts for the Zone and working long hour days for a long time. When he wrote this script, there was a Christmas magic in the air. It is about even more than the meek, it's about trying to improve us through the ultimate Christmas fantasy. He could not have done it any better, there is even a touch of the script that reminds me of an O'Henry short story.

Art Carney was such a talented actor and how he got this role is one of the greatest accidents of tv history. I can not imagine any other actor who could have brought it off better. Corwins character is cut out of an O'Henry tale. A drunken department store Santa who can't handle reality. That reality is so stark in this black and white world. "Christmas should be something finer" Corwin mutters to the Department store manager when he is fired after drinking too much and taking too long a break on the job.

Can any dialogue ever top this quote - " I can either drink, or I can weep, and drinking is so much more subtle. But as for my insubordination, I was not rude to that woman. Someone should remind her that Christmas is more than barging up and down department store aisles and pushing people out of the way. Someone has to tell her that Christmas is another thing finer than that. Richer, finer, truer, and it should come with patience and love, charity, compassion. That's what I would have told her if you'd given me the chance. I don't know how to tell you, Mr. Dundee. I don't know at all. All I know is that I'm an aging, purposeless, relic of another time, and I live in a dirty rooming house on a street filled with hungry kids and shabby people, where the only thing that comes down the chimney on Christmas Eve is more poverty. Do you know another reason why I drink, Mr. Dundee? So that when I walk down the tenements, I can really think it's the North Pole, and the children are elves, and that I'm really Santa Claus bringing a bag of wondrous gifts for all of them. I just wish, Mr. Dundee, on one Christmas, only one, that I could see some of the hopeless ones and the dreamless ones. Just on one Christmas, I'd like to see the meek inherit the Earth. And that's why I drink, Mr. Dundee, and that's why I weep."

Art Carney as Henry Corwin can only do this and it is so emotional.

This is only in the first half of this episode. From here on this gets even better, as it only can, in the Twilight Zone.
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9/10
Sentimental and a magic touching of emotions!
blanbrn28 November 2019
This "Twilight Zone" episode from season 2 1960 "The Night of the Meek" is a classic and very memorable one and it's touching as the down and out get help. It stars Art Carney as a drunk a down and out alcoholic who gets fired on Christmas Eve because he's again late to work at the local department store to see kids. Now it's hardship for him and all involved only things spin and take on a magical form in this windy cold Christmas Eve night as a bag of gifts come from the heart! Lovable performance from Carney as his heart is so big really this tale has become classic viewing a must during the holiday season.
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10/10
Santa's in the Twilight Zone!
ericstevenson19 July 2018
Warning: Spoilers
You probably didn't think that "The Twilight Zone" of all shows would have a Christmas episode, do you? Turns out they do, and I love it! The plot is that a drunk Mall Santa is being fired. He finds a magic bag that gives someone whatever present they want. I think this same thing was later used in "Ernest Saves Christmas". I guess it makes sense, as Santa couldn't fit all the toys at the same time.

Yeah, it's a shame I didn't see this around Christmas. It's still a spirit you can have all year to keep! I admit it's quite impressive how they managed to portray a guy who initially appears as an obnoxious drunk into a really relatable person. I didn't quite get the ending though. Was he the real Santa who forgot who he was or a new person to take on the job of Santa? Yep, weird to have flying reindeer in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" but they made it work as this is one of the most heartwarming episodes of the series. ****
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10/10
Hey, It's "Norton" (Art Carney) giving a yeoman's performance in Mr. Serling's fine, Comic Book-like Fantasy.
redryan6426 December 2007
Warning: Spoilers
To begin with, let me say that this was a most unusual an Episode of THE TWILIGHT ZONE. For one week, we had no extra-terrestrials, no time warps, no super-twist world switching and not one reference to death, itself.

We have offered for our approval, the Story of a guy who is down on his luck. One Henry Corwin (Art Carney) is filled with a depression; one that is worsened by the Yuletide Season's approaching its climax of Christmas Eve. We see that in the Department Store where he has seasonal employment, his post is deserted. Oh, there're plenty of kids standing in line, but the great Chair sits empty. The sign promising that "Santa Claus will return by…" stands alone, its deadline obviously having been passed for sometime. A tense Store Manager, Mr. Dundee (John Fiedler), nervously stares at the time, the door, Santa's Throne and the growing anger, ever-more intense, of the Kiddies and Parents in the long line.

Meanwhile down the street, we find Henry Corwin at his overextended lunchtime break; sitting at the Bar having his sandwich with 3 or 4 shots of Bourbon. The hostility of the Bar Tender (Val Avery) being indicative of his overstaying his welcome; being all decked out in his Santa Costume and beard and all.

Henry is obviously somewhat inebriated. But this is most likely something that he hasn't done up until now, on Christmas Eve; because he most certainly would have been dismissed for such behaviour had it been earlier in the Shopping Season.

Henry's lamentations, while being obviously those of a troubled soul, yet are neither personal nor self-centered. If anything, his semi-intoxicated ravings are most selfless wishes for the ability to do something for the poorest of the poor. The rundown fleabag of a flophouse provides many of the most down-trodden of neighbors, whom he sees, everyday.

Upon his return to the Store, falling on his face and getting into argument with a bitchy Mother of a bratty kid; Henry is discharged from his position with the caveat of getting rid of his cheap Santa outfit. The Manager rationalizes that, "It's almost closing time, anyway." Once out in the dark and dimly lit street, he makes his way toward his home at the run-down old Hotel.

Cutting through an alley, he encounters an apparently enchanted cat who, in being possessed with certain magical powers, transforms a bag of garbage and tin cans into a magical cornucopia of bag, laden with unending supply of gifts. Indeed, whatever is asked for is found to be in it; as he soon discovers. He treats the homeless men at the local Mission to; as well as a number of poor, street urchins.

Yet, such gift giving prowess and generosity does not go unpunished; as soon he is in custody of the Police;his former Store Manager having accused him accused with thievery of goods from the Department Store. Their reasoning being that, where else would a guy like Henry have gotten any of the goods involved? Henry gets released after a re-appearance by the magical feline, who apparently knows how and when to apply his trade at the most needed of times. An inspection of the bag reveals that same cat, with mostly what appeared to be a great supply of tin cans.

Free again from the Police Station, Henry heads out again into the cold, snowy, dark streets. He is still muttering about wishing he could do something for the poorest of people; who live in the greatest squalor. He is suddenly greeted by an elf beckoning him to come forth to a team of sure-nuff Reindeer, hitched-up to a real-life Sleigh, damn straight, Schultz! As Henry hops in with the Elf, he takes the reins and, while having neither previous experience nor any instruction in aeronautical sciences, he takes off in the Sleigh. Meanwhile, below in the City, just leaving the Police Station are the Store Manager (John Fielder) and investigating Policeman, Officer (Robert P. Lieb), who have both been imbibing of some fine vintage Brandy; which had also been conjured-up by the magical trash bag. When walking away from the front stairs, they both sight, up in the now moonlit sky, the now airborne sleigh. Henry had gotten his wish.

What we thought of as being a so-so installment of THE TWILIGHT ZONE in 1960 (when I was 14 Years of Age), is now looked upon by these older, and we hope wiser eyes as being one that belongs at the top of the heap, the head of the class.

One other thing struck me about the story and how it is told. The style, the mood and the plausible rendering of an otherwise fantastic set of happenings, all are woven into a tight knit and thought provoking story. If anyone is familiar with the works of the great Comics innovator, Mr. Will Eisner or has read stories of his fine character, "The Spirit" in the Comic Books or in the newspaper comic strips; they may well see what a similarity that exists.

The rendering of the fantastic story, the moods created, the bleak street scenes and the characters are very much like those of a Will Eisner Spirit tale. And that leaves us to wonder; do you think that maybe Mr. Rod Serling had been a reader of the Spirit while he was growing up?
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8/10
The twilight zone at Christmas time...
Anonymous_Maxine28 June 2008
Night of the Meek is certainly a unique twilight zone episode, coming off more like a family Christmas classic than the typical stuff we have come to expect from Rod Serling, things about other worlds and aliens and mysterious happenings. There is, of course, a lot of that in this episode, but it's couched in a story that resembles A Christmas Carol than anything else.

A drunk stumbles late back to his seasonal job as Santa Claus at a local mall, and on the way a cat screeches and knocks over a bag of garbage, which suddenly turns into a bag overflowing with toys and gifts. The drunken Santa suddenly becomes a real Santa, eagerly snatching up the bag and distributing to anyone he can find their heart's desire.

This is a great way to show what people's true heart's desire may be, and I love the way it makes us think about our own heart's desire. It seems to me that the purpose here is to call attention to how trivial a lot of our desires may be. When offered the opportunity to have anything they want, the people in the show ask for meaningless things like sweaters and pipes.

There is a moving scene in the episode where Henry, the drunk Santa, says that if he could have anything he wanted, he would want to do this same thing every year. It's a wonderful illustration of what I think is our inherent desire to do good things for other people. Alcoholism is a terrible affliction, but it is immediately forgotten about when Henry suddenly finds himself in the position to bring so much happiness to so many people.

It gets a little cheesy at the end, like so many of them, but is still a great example of the twilight zone presenting a story that captures the spirit of the season.
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7/10
A Twilight Zone Christmas Special
Samuel-Shovel20 August 2019
Warning: Spoilers
In "The Night of the Meek" a down on his luck department store Santa with a drinking problem finds a bag that supplies people with anything they desire for Christmas.

This one's one of those rare Twilight Zone episodes with a feel good ending! It's saccharine as hell but I always find that Christmas movies and TV episodes are one of the rare genres that can get away with an air of naiveness successfully.

This episode does look like utter garbage unfortunately. They cut corners on the final product and it shows. I would love to see this one as a remastered version if that's even possible?
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10/10
Art Carney as the "real" Santa Claus
chuck-reilly3 January 2008
Warning: Spoilers
"Night of the Meek" is not your usual Twilight Zone episode. It's shot in an early use of video which gives the piece an almost "live" feel to it. It's a sentimental and heart-warming story about a down-and-out drunken bum (Art Carney) who dons a Santa Claus outfit at Christmas time and works in a New York City department store. Carney is fired for showing up soused but is soon miraculously redeemed by discovering a magic bag in a nearby alley that gives everyone the gift of their dreams. After handing out all the contents of this wonder bag, Carney muses to himself about this being the best Christmas he's ever had---even though he ends up with no gifts for himself. His only consolation is that, for once in his life, he really WAS Santa Claus for a day. Before he returns to his flop-house, however, he hears a strange jingle in the same alley where he found the magic bag. To his surprise, a familiar sled and some famous reindeer are awaiting his arrival. A mischievous elf suddenly appears and prods him into the contraption. "There's more work to do, Santa," says the elf. "We have to get ready for next year." Carney happily obliges and away they all go. Writer Serling's point in all this is that Christmas and the true spirit of giving is universal and a "state of mind" more than anything else. It's enough to bring a tear to one's eye.
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4/10
Only the Easter Bunny would have been worse.
darrenpearce11126 January 2014
No one will ever read this review except to glance at the rating and click 'no' to 'useful' as I'm in the heretic position of not liking a mawkish and silly wino-Santa tale. Henry Corwin (Art Carney) is a melancholy department store Santa who wants Christmas to be about the finer attributes of humanity. He finds a magic bag -and you can probably guess the rest. Very little happens and there are no characters to get the viewer feeling the slightest bit involved. Corvin would do well to look further and deeper than the bottom of a bottle to help the needy.

Don't watch this on Christmas Eve, watch 'The Changing Of The Guard' from series three. That was a deeply moving episode with a message.
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10/10
One of the best
GMGoodwrenchGirl29 December 2019
The Twilight Zone is one of the finest shows ever aired. That being said, this may be its finest episode.

Art Carney is simply amazing in his role as a down and out department store Santa...especially if you have only ever seen him portray Ed Norton on 'The Honeymooners'. This actor was far more than a great comic sidekick. John Fiedler (the voice of Winnie the Pooh's Piglet) is also a joy to watch. Great cast overall.

This episode is one of those rare gems that depicts the true meaning of Christmas. Much like 'A Christmas Carol', it is a story of one man's redemption due to a miracle. A true classic, this is one I always have to watch every year.
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10/10
One of the great Zones
slothropgr26 August 2011
A Christmas story to rank with "A Christmas Carol" and "The Gift of the Magi." Man, Rod could be a cynical even mean-spirited SOB in his writing, but when he opened his heart he opened it all the way and let everything out. Carney overdoes it a bit as drunken moth-eaten ol' Henry Corwin, but he goes down easy, just like his booze. If nothing else, this is a good example of tight writing--every scene, almost every line, contributing to the shamelessly heart-warming ending. Compare it to the later remake with Richard Mulligan (who also does well) and you'll see what I mean. The 10 stars is despite the fact they videotaped it instead of filming, which I understand Rod regretted later on. Makes the set look even more artificial than it is, but only dents the enjoyment very slightly. And it's great to watch wonderful character actors and TZ stalwarts like John Fiedler, Bob Lieb and Burt Mustin (the eternal Old Man) doing their thing. "And we'll thank God for Christmas, Officer Flaherty, that's what we'll do. We'll thank God for Christmas."
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Watch first, read spoilers later. A masterful script, brilliantly told.
david-thor30 November 2018
Of all the stories from the masterful mind of Rod Serling, this strikes me as easily within the top five. Sensitive, blunt, supremely thoughtful and jpyful amidst the sadness, "The Night of the Meek" harkens to a time when "Christmas stuff" didn't clog stores before Halloween. Twilight Zone survives because of the generations who rediscover its brilliance.
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