"The Twilight Zone" The Bewitchin' Pool (TV Episode 1964) Poster

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9/10
Aunt Ti's home for the unloved
bkoganbing8 December 2012
Dee Hartford and Tod Andrews are a pair of rich parents who are constantly quarreling and as a result their kids Mary Badham and Jeffrey Byron are left pretty much to themselves. One day a strange Huckleberry Finn type kid played by Kim Hector shows up in their swimming pool out of nowhere and asks them to dive in because he's going to take them to a magical place where kids can laugh and play all day. Who could resist an invitation like that at age 11 or 12.

They dive in and come up in a swimming hole where a whole flock of kids just look like they're having a great old time. It's all presided over by a kindly old woman Aunt Ti played by Georgia Simmons who got the career role of her life.

This is a place where the unwanted kids have a portal open to them and can stay forever should they choose. Badham and Byron have a bit of deciding to do.

This Twilight Zone episode was one of the most imaginative ever done in the series and it's a great one to end the series run. I saw it as a kid and never forgot it. Good thing that The Twilight Zone was so popular and I could see it over and over.

Never miss this one if broadcast.
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9/10
Pretty odd...even for "The Twilight Zone"
blockerlover19 January 2007
Warning: Spoilers
Mary Badham (Scout from "To Kill a Mockingbird") plays Sport this time, in an Earl Hamner, Jr. teleplay about a brother and sister who are invited to escape their troubled lives by retreating to a magical kiddie-land overseen by a marvelous old woman. Sport is initially wary of this lady and calls her a kidnapper, but there are no twists in this scenario and the lady is just what she seems: a friendly, wholesome Auntie who bakes cakes and sews and gives the kids light chores to keep them active (they better be active if they don't want diabetes!). This episode has a sweetly zonked, dream-like quality (made even more surreal by peculiar overdubbing on Badham during the outdoor scenes--she's given a high, Southern-styled voice by June Foray, Rocky on the "Bullwinkle" cartoons). Still, the lack of an ominous undercurrent makes this a refreshing change for "The Twilight Zone" and it's fun to imagine what the hateful parents will do with each other now that their kids are long gone.
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8/10
A Great Episode!!!
ralsalongi31 August 2006
Warning: Spoilers
I can't understand all the negative comments about this show. THis has always been one of my favorite episodes of the series. I think the show had some good issues and does not date even until today. It showed how children of neglectful parents could react and the consequences it could bring.

As for the questions about did the parents call the police and report the kids missing? Perhaps they did, but who cares!!! The real moral is the children were not happy with those mean parents (the mother was an absolute b___h) and they had found a better place and went to live there. And I think Aunty T was a sweet old lady who loved children, not a witch. She looked more like the sweet grandmother to me.

I think Rod's (Serling) comment at the end summed it up greatly: "A brief epilogue for concerned parents: We grown ups know there's no such a place as the gingerbread house of Aunt T or a door at the bottom of a swimming pool that leads to a secret place. But who knows what the world of children of unwanted parents can become. For Jeb and Sport Sherwood their need for love turned fantasy into reality. They found a secret place in the Twilight Zone."
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8/10
Names of the children
ShadyKay1 January 2011
Mary Badham's name in To Kill A Mockingbird was Scout, and her brother's name was Jem. Her name here is Sport, and her brother is Jeb. Just thought that was rather odd, and wonder if Earl Hamner did that as a paean to Harper Lee.

I was very distracted by the overdubbing - as others have mentioned, so clearly June Foray. I kept expecting Rocket J. Squirrel to show up. Clearly Mary Badham knew how to project - she certainly did so in TKAM and This Property Is Condemned. I can't imagine why the dubbing was used.

I thought this was a fitting end to the series - an escape from a bad situation via a magic portal.
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8/10
"We don't have to stay with neither one of you!"
classicsoncall19 September 2010
Warning: Spoilers
Well the reviews look rather mixed on this, the last episode of The Twilight Zone series. For my part, I think the show ended on a high note, with Rod Serling returning to one of his most cherished themes - the yearning for a carefree youth rid of the pressures of a grown up world which seems to have nothing but problems. In the case of Sport (Mary Badham) and Jeb (Tim Stafford) Sherwood, those pressures include the ugly marriage of their parents that's about to end in divorce. I have to side with the youngsters here; just how many times would you want to hear yourself being referred to by your mother as 'those loudmouth kids'.

I found interesting another viewer's comments about the repeat of the opening scene. This was the only TZ to do it, but any classic Western TV fan will tell you it was a commonplace device, just check out 'Cheyenne' or 'Lawman'. Here the scene wasn't quite repeated in exactly the same way, for example, Whitt (Kim Hector) didn't show up the second time around to entice the Sherwood siblings. In any event, I did find it curious as well.

I guess all kids find solace in a 'secret place'. Mine would have been more easily attainable if it wasn't so far from home. My Dad used to take me small game hunting as a kid, and there was this huge boulder in the woods that seemed to be the perfect spot on which to sit and reflect on the state of one's being. I wonder if Serling had such a place, my suspicion is that he did. My suspicion is that Serling also had a uniquely introspective quality that saw the world through a child's eyes, and questioned why the good times of youth couldn't last forever. Some would refer to a thing called progress, but on that score I have to wonder. For all the advancement in science and technology in the half century since the first Twilight Zone, it takes a lot of Aunt T's to keep the world a sound and safe place for the kids of today.
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10/10
I named my dog after Sport
adoptapitty4 July 2014
Warning: Spoilers
That's how much I loved this episode. And everyone out there who has given this low ratings, you have to be kidding, this is a great feel good Twilight zone. They also purposefully used the first scene and brought it back to the end on purpose, they were showing it full circle. And the parents lackadaisical behavior just goes to show how awful these parents are. The children take matters into their own hands and just goes to show how it takes a village to raise children. Especially when there is alcohol or drug problems. The wife said to her husband that he just "drinks his dinner anyway ". So they are much better off without their parents, especially given when they couldn't find them initially in the pool, they shared hardly any emotion.
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Skin-Divers Beware
dougdoepke18 July 2006
Warning: Spoilers
Children of quarreling parents look for help in secret world.

The parents in this family are a couple of glamorous gargoyles. They bicker, fight, yell at the children, and threaten divorce. The unknowing kids think they are causing the problem, which of course they aren't, but which makes their unhappy situation all the more poignant. So they look for escape into a secret world, presided over by a benevolent grandmotherly type, who rather surprisingly looks more like a witch than a fairy godmother. Earl Hamner specialized in these kinds of scripts with the warm family values of hearth and home. This one is no different, although the kids have to cross into the TZ to find them. Nothing special here. What is significant is that this is the last of the entries to appear on network TV. And so the series closes with neither a bang nor a whimper.

Perhaps it's just as well that the series exits on a note of reminiscence for days gone by, of boys with fishing poles and girls with jump rope. For many of us, I'm sure there is something nostalgic about seeing these episodes again after so many years, along with a look back to a time when we were those boys and girls, thrilled to see this great, great series for the first time. Thanks, Rod Serling, Buck Houghton and the many others for all the unforgettable moments. I think you achieved a lot more than you may have thought.
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6/10
The Escape
AaronCapenBanner8 November 2014
Mary Badham & Tim Stafford play Sport & Jeb Sharewood, two unhappy siblings who are suddenly faced with the reality that their long-bickering parents are going to finally divorce. They find solace swimming in their pool, but instead are amazed to find that the bottom is a portal that leads to a children's paradise run by a loving old woman named Aunt T.(played by Georgia Simmons) They love it there, but Sport becomes concerned about leaving behind their parents, though since the paradise is a sanctuary from unworthy parents, the two of them decide to make a final swim back there upon return... Last broadcast episode of the series has become notorious for the bad post-production dubbing, but this is still a sweet(if flawed) fable about escape, which is after all what the Twilight Zone was all about.
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6/10
A children's 'Willoughby'.
darrenpearce11122 January 2014
No getting around it- this is a bad episode. It makes a good point about self-obsessed parents being unworthy of their children. I like the fact that the Sport (Mary Badham) clearly IMAGINES a special place for children before she and Jeb are beckoned to go to such a place by a country boy in the swimming pool. Imagination is their escape from unhappiness with narcissistic and bickering parents. Aunt Ti in the 'other' world gives them a constructive mixture of work and pleasure to build their self esteem. These are the good points made by this final TZ episode, written by Earl Hamner, whose previous seven stories (apart from 'Black Leather Jackets') made him a stalwart contributor to the standard of the show.

However the faults with this one are manifold and well documented- the repetition of a scene - the dubbing of Mary Badham's voice. Too many too list.

A nice message to end on for the greatest show ever.
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8/10
The accents are plausible
emguy16 May 2016
To those who complained about the children and their parents having different accents... This happens all the time. Almost invariably, no matter what sort of accent the parents have, or no matter what language is spoken at home, young children automatically absorb the local language and the local accent of wherever they're growing up. Once kids hit the age of 12 or so, their accent locks in and probably won't change much after that. I've seen this over and over and over. Clearly, the kids in this episode grew up in the US South, but the parents didn't.

I thought this was a decent episode. It looks at the impact on the children when the parents have become hostile toward each other, and then they take it out on the kids. This being the Twilight Zone, it gave the kids a TZ way to handle the situation. Since it's basically a short story format, it left a few mysteries behind, and that's okay. TZ episodes are often about the mystery, not the explanations.

Why didn't the episode show the parents calling the police? Turning this into a police procedural about missing children would have been off the point.
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4/10
Creepy, but not in a good way
richardriis5 July 2006
Warning: Spoilers
The last and hardly the best of the original episodes. Earl Hamner wrote a number of excellent folksy TZ episodes, but this one reeks of formula. I was always troubled by this episode. Do these children really want to spend the rest of their lives with that creepy Aunt T? Is cake every day better than life in the real world? Do the children never want to see their parents again, divorced or otherwise? Did the parents report the children to the authorities as missing? Would they be thrown in jail under suspicion of some unspeakable crime? Why do the children have such thick southern drawls when their parents have no accents at all? June Foray's obvious overdubbing of Mary Badham's voice adds to the creepiness. Shudder.
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3/10
Two Dimensional and Kinda Boring
gregjohnson36528 July 2014
Warning: Spoilers
I kept watching thinking "there has to be some terrific twist at the end to justify this really boring, clichéd story." But there wasn't. I missed the credits in the beginning and thought "That little girl looks like Scout but sounds like Rocky the Squirrel. Did they do a Glen Close/Andi McDowell/Tarzan thing? "

It turns out, my waiting for the twist was the only bit of dramatic tension associated with the show. Did I miss some symbolism? Did the shoes the kids were polishing represent running dogs of a capital imperialist society? Was Aunt T the evil stepsister of Aunt B on Andy Griffith Show? Was this episode on Earl Hamner's demo reel when he was pitching The Waltons?

So many great episodes of a truly groundbreaking series. This wasn't one of them.
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10/10
Goodbye, Twilight Zone
ericstevenson1 January 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Watching the "Twilight Zone" marathon, I was wondering what the last episode was and I looked it up. What an amazing coincidence! It just so happened to be the next episode they were airing! This episode is told in a non linear fashion as it actually shows us the ending first and then the rest of the episode! I guess it's hard to say whether or not these are even spoilers, seeing as how they actually tell us how it ends right at the beginning of the episode. I could swear that's the voice actress for Rocky (from "Rocky and Bullwinkle") dubbing the girl's voice.

I guess as an anthology series, we weren't expecting some big grand finale. Instead, we just have the same stories that have made the show so great. It's interesting how you can interpret the ending too. Is it really meant to be happy for the kids? Is this place even real? It's pretty unique even by the show's standards. There were later versions of the show made decades later but nothing will ever beat this original material. ****
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3/10
Unbelievably bad
A couple of others have said it already, but I have to add my voice to the chorus. How this POS ended up with a 6.8 is beyond me. The acting is terrible -- like a first-day run-through with tech personnel subbing for some of the uncast parts. The dubbing of the little girl is so bad as to make her almost unwatchable when she's on. The rest of the cast -- with the exception of Aunt T -- can't blame their bad performances on bad dubbing. The script is bad -- like a rough draft someone worked out on his lunch hour. And the story would be weird and tepid even without the weird continuity problem of the doubled footage -- it has a lame, unsatisfying ending unworthy of the series with its tradition of the supremely fitting denouements.

I only watched this because someone told me that the B-52's song "Private Idaho" made a lot of references to this episode, but other than the sample of the TZ theme and the general theme of character flaw getting some surreal comeuppance, I don't see it. Yes, there's a lot of talk of swimming pools in both, but even "The Swimmer" has more in common with the song than this.
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3/10
The Twilight Zone - The Bewitchin' Pool
Scarecrow-881 January 2015
Warning: Spoilers
Phew, this reeks of rotten and I don't blame Serling at all for dumping it at the very end of the season. A great show, even in the legacy of a phenom such as The Twilight Zone, there are stinkers. "The Bewitchin' Pool" is by far the show's absolute worst. A real groaner with a horrible (I mean embarrassingly putrid) dubbing job for Mary Badham by the recognizable legendary voice of June Foray (Rocky & Bullwinkle this is not) during a key scene that is replayed twice (another bad decision; replaying a rather sadly awful scene twice truly does sink this beyond rescue) regarding a daughter and son who are told by their always-bickering parents (affluence doesn't keep them from taking off the gloves and going bare-knuckle in their verbal disparagements against each other) that a divorce is imminent, with a choice having to made on which one (mother or father) they will live with. So what do the kids do? They dive into their nice backyard pool and wind up at the backwoods abode of Aunt T. Cake is offered as well as harmony and playtime always. I think the idea is a rather swell one many of us, when we are young, fantasize about perhaps: to escape the disappointment of life for something far more comforting and peaceful. However, the execution in this episode is so abysmal (the series was on the outs and everyone knew it, with Serling exhausted at this point from his overwork and the wear and tear of keeping The Twilight Zone afloat), any possible point devoted to the idea is wasted. Badham's link to "To Kill a Mockingbird" does provide this episode with a little bit of intrigue, I guess, but her voice is really only noticeable when among Auntie T and the kids who live with her. Spending time with the parents and their never-ceasing nastiness towards each other (anyone familiar with "Lost in Space" will be stunned to see how narcissistic, ornery, antagonistic, loud, and cruel Dee Hartford is as the mother, but Tod Andrews' father doesn't exactly ingratiate himself to us as he offers plenty of snide remarks towards his wife that are equally as noxious), it is easy to see why the kids would wish to free themselves from that.

I kept asking myself "what happens when Auntie T dies?" Okay, this is a fairy tale where Auntie T is immortal and the kids maybe never grow up, with the whole "happy ever after" tag. I think the episode is just riddled with illogic plot problems, so wrought with them (the kids vanish, so what do the parents do? How did this "ripple in whatever dimension Auntie T lives" exist to begin with? What happens if the kids get tired of Auntie T and need to leave? Even if the parents are pariahs, do the kids totally just forget them altogether?) that nothing good can come from it by the end. I guess the appeal will be the general idea itself: to have an escape to a place that doesn't have parents constantly squabbling and there's tranquility and joy in abundance children desire. Those who wanted this when they were young to avoid the day-in, day-out fights between moms and pops could identify with the children in "The Bewitchin' Pool". Other than that, I see no value to this whatsoever. The acting (Hartford and Andrews, in particular) is so lousy that if this episode had the writing from the great season prior to it, it still would have suffered.
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7/10
A couple flaws but Interesting
richspenc31 July 2017
Warning: Spoilers
What I like about some episodes of TZ are the surreal escapist appeal that really take you away to a different and peaceful or interesting place. "A stop at Willoughby" was a good example of that. This episode has some of that too, it's not as good as "Willoughby" but it has that intriguing escapist charm in the alternate dimension that the kids swim to from the bottom of their pool when trying to get away from the tension of their bickering parents. I did not like the parents much in this episode, the way they treated their kids, even yelling at them to "pipe down!" when they are only laughing and talking, and splashing a little water around. What kids don't do that? I know that to help make this kind of story effective, there needs to be an overbearing, unpleasant, nasty character, such as Gart's boss in "Willoughby" yelling "push!push!!push!!", or Gart's gold digging wife who was only with him for the money and couldn't care less about his actual feelings. So seeing the kids in this ep coming out the other side of the gateway between worlds into that tranquil and surreal lake by the peaceful looking cottage with Aunt T, it became easy for the viewer to believe that the kids would be happier there. The kids' parents were not nice, reasonable people, especially their mother. She was so spoiled and looked at her kids as nothing but an annoyance. And when they were telling their kids about how they were divorcing, and them getting irritated at their kids for acting upset? What kids wouldn't react upset to something like that? And the mother had the nerve to tell them "show us some consideration!" I did like the sequence of how the scenes of the episode played out, such as the scene where the parents were telling their kids they were divorcing, and then the kids jumping into the pool and disappearing. It was the first scene of the episode. Then the next scene where the kids and parents are all hanging outside the pool, and the viewers are probably thinking how that moment was after when they told the kids about the divorce and then them jumping into the pool and seemingly disappearing. And when they're next sitting by the pool, it appears at that moment that the kids quickly showed up again without any major issues after the parents were screaming about where they disappeared to. There are a couple surprises in the episode about what really happened in which sequence.
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1/10
Worst Twilight Zone Episode Ever
craiginnyc1 January 2014
This was the last episode in the series, and I have to believe it was only aired because of some contractual obligation. This should have never been released to the public. It is so flawed on so many levels. It totally lacks continuity, the opening scene containing footage that is repeated later in the episode. I also understand that the overdubbing of Mary Badham's exterior dialog by June Foray was due to background noise, but it should have caused the entire episode to be scrapped. And let's not forget the hideous dialog and acting, especially from the shrewish mother. It's kind of shocking that Earl Hamner went on to be successful with The Waltons after having written this horrible piece of crap. Every year during the Twilight Zone marathon I watch this miserable train wreck and wonder how it ever got released.
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5/10
Those Doggone Parents
Hitchcoc16 April 2014
I think this is just a mediocre effort. Many years ago there was a cartoon called "Dreamland." In it a pair of little waifs who went to bed hungry each night dreamed they were in a place where candy grew out of the ground, they were clothed nicely, and all their troubles went away. Ultimately, they woke up to the poverty which was their lives. Eventually, they come to know some happiness. The parents in this episode are so awful. They are spoiled and edgy and have no respect for their children. So while swimming in the enormous pool, the kids find themselves in a kind of "Huckleberry Finn" world with Auntie T making them cake and teaching them traditional crafts. The lesson here is so ham-handed that it loses any subtlety. When one had about twenty-five minutes to tell a story, those subtleties were often ejected. Here, however, there is no chance for reconciliation or redemption. It lacks even a little complexity or irony. Maybe even Auntie T's new book that she bought from some aliens, "How to Serve Man." Most of the family shows of the time were so syrupy that another dose didn't contribute much.
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Repetition in Betwitchen' Pool
sprose11 January 2010
Warning: Spoilers
I am just wondering, has anyone noticed that this particular episode is the only one in the series in which there is a duplication of a scene, which seems to be an error? There is a repetition of the footage. One first sees the scene where the children are told about the impending divorce, and this is repeated, inexplicably, later in the episode. It's hard to believe that an error as egregious as this would pass unnoticed, but I cannot figure it out. If it's intended, what would be the point of showing that particular segment twice? On another note, does the collected set of Twilight Zone have the Owl Creek episode, which I have never been privileged to see?
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5/10
Not a bad story, was unsuccessful due to post-production issues
GMJames22 March 2019
As written by Earl Hamner Jr. ("The Waltons" creator), I was interested in the two children who deal with their unhappy family situation by visiting a fantasy land through a portal in their backyard swimming pool. This "Twilight Zone" episode was notable for production errors which could not be saved in post-production.

As posted in the episode's Trivia section, because of audio issues, dialog for all of the outdoor scenes were re-dubbed by almost the entire cast. Mary Badham was unable to assist so June Foray re-dubbed Badham's dialog, which was so noticeable, I could not watch the episode without being annoyed by the audio.

As a viewer, I should care less about a project's production issues and more about if the story was interesting and how it affect me. In this case, it's a shame that the producers were unable to resolve their technical problems likely due to running out of time and money.
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5/10
Voiceovers
thbryn22 March 2019
Mary Badham was an unusually talented child actress. Certainly she could have done adequate voice work throughout, as she did at the 20 min. mark on the episode.
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3/10
A Belly Flop
barlowralph21 May 2013
I'm a huge fan of Earl Hamner, because of The Waltons, but this Twilight Zone episode was a real belly flop. His writing here was simplistic and predictable. The acting was terrible, by all of the actors, due in no small measure, I suspect, to the "work" of the director! (The bad voice dubbing was the least of this episode's problems). Furthermore, where did those kids get their awful southern accents? Not from their parents, obviously! It doesn't make any sense! The parents are clearly uptown socialite types, and the kids act and sound like country bumpkins. It's a good thing this was the last episode of Twilight Zone to be aired, because if it had been seen any sooner, it would have killed the series!
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10/10
I know why the Foray Bird Sings
MARKETEX19691 January 2009
Warning: Spoilers
I don't know whether any other person has noticed the reason for the June Foray overdubbing of Sport's outdoor lines, but as an audio engineer, it seems obvious that her indoor lines are just fine and the outdoor scenes were probably off-mike, due to the fact that, as the actress states, she has never had formal training, nor does she, even at this point in her life, think it is necessary. Voice projection is a learned skill.

Actually the above paragraph was the extent of my remarks as brevity is the soul of wit, so I guess I need more to satisfy the criteria, so here goes.

Another reason for the overdubbing, and the general tone of this episode, could be the desire of the producers to play to the southern market and the affiliates in that region of the country. Of the latter, I cannot be as sure as I was of the former conclusion.
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2/10
My nominee for one of the lamest episode of the series...
MartinHafer10 September 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This story is about two little kids who have awful parents who are just so self-involved that they could care less about their children. But, as it turns out, there is a hidden world with a sweet (and rather creepy) old lady who is like the loving parent the kids never had. Oddly, to get to this magical land (much better, by the way than Candy Mountain), the kids swim there through a weird vortex or something in their pool (or maybe they just drown and this is Heaven--who knows).

This is one of the least often seen episodes of THE TWILIGHT ZONE series and I assume this is due to two reasons. First, it might be because it was the final episode of the original series and if they show the episodes in order, then it's likely this one is often skipped. Second, it's also probably one of the weakest of the episodes--being pretty dull and uninspiring. In fact, it's very saccharine and will probably lull most of you to sleep. There is hardly any irony or suspense--just saccharine and that creepy old lady! It's sad to see the series end on a whimper.
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10/10
Wow
ileas1 February 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Wow, people really hated this episode. It's always been one of my favorites. Had no idea about the dubbing, although something did seem off about the girl's voice. And the beginning that's shown later, i've seen it done several times as a way to show the audience there's a problem, then they go back and show what led to it, then how it's resolved. No biggie...to me, anyway. The story itself was awesome. As has already been said, the parents are awful. Seriously, 'loud mouthed kids' 'you darn kids'. Does she really believe she's a good person talking to her own children like that? The father isn't much better. He's not as unkind as the mother, but he's distant with his children. Now, what's really messed up is them making the children decide who they are going to stay with, and you can tell they're thinking, 'please don't pick me.' Who does this? Are there actually parents in the world that think it's their children's job to decide these things. When the mother says to Sport, 'well, if it wasn't for you kids, we wouldn't have stayed together as long as we did, so you might show us a little consideration' I wanted to throw stuff at my tv. Why do they even have kids? Now about the portal to Aunt T's, very cool. They got the right actress for the part. She reasons with the kids, even when they want to fight each other, and talks to them like they're people, not property or a nuisance. At first, Sport calls her a kidnapper. Her response is very heartwarming and believable. She's thought about it, whenever she sees children being treated badly, but, as she said, she's always resisted the temptation. It's a natural feeling to want to do something to protect a suffering child. Sport hears her mother calling them, but Aunt T tells her those voices will fade over time. Sport still isn't convinced, and insists their parents still love them. Jeb wants to stay, but Aunt T says if their parents really do love them, they should go back. It's unlikely they can come back for a visit, many who leave don't come back. Next thing you know, Jeb goes back, with Sport covering for him. She goes and gets him when their mother wants to talk to them. She's still hopeful, telling Jeb that things will be different, their parents are going to love them. It's heartbreaking. Then we're back to the beginning, and the children escape their parents by jumping in the pool and calling for Aunt T. When they suddenly disappear, the father dives after them, and the mother suddenly cares if they drown. I love the very end. The kids are with Aunt T and the Huckleberry Finn boy, about to dig into the cake, when Sport suddenly stops, thinking she hears something. It's her mother, her voice is very faint, and she's pleading for them to come back. But Sport isn't falling for it this time, they had their chance. She shakes it off, and eats cake, proving what Aunt T said is true, the voices fade over time. I don't even feel a little bit sorry for the parents. They didn't really want children, now they don't have children. Careful what you wish for. Awesome episode.
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