The Twilight Zone (1959–1964)
8.2/10
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15 user 2 critic

A Penny for Your Thoughts 

Gaining telepathic abilities when his coin lands on its edge bank clerk Hector B. Poole learns about the difference between other people's plans and fantasies.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
... Hector B. Poole
... Helen Turner
... E.M. Bagby
... L.J. Smithers
... Sykes
... Jim
Frank London ... Driver
Anthony Ray ... Newsboy
... Brand
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Storyline

Bank clerk Hector Poole develops telepathic powers after tossing a coin to a newspaper vendor that miraculously stands on its edge. He discovers the positive and negative effects of listening in on other peoples thoughts, plans and fantasies. Written by laird-3

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TV-PG
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Release Date:

3 February 1961 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title comes from the old English expression "A penny of your thoughts" which dates back to John Heywood's compilation of proverbs "A Dialogue Containing the Number in Effect of all the Proverbs in the English Tongue." See more »

Goofs

When Bagby emerges from his office to tell Poole about the Ajax loan fraud he prevented, his mouth says "Acme" and not "Ajax", indicating a post-production redub. See more »

Quotes

[closing narration]
Narrator: One time in a million, a coin will land on its edge, but all it takes to knock it over is a vagrant breeze, a vibration, or a slight blow. Hector B. Poole, a human coin, on edge for a brief time - in the Twilight Zone.
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Connections

Referenced in The Twilight Zone: 20/20 Vision (1988) See more »

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User Reviews

Don't Even Think It
10 July 2006 | by See all my reviews

Due to a freak accident, a meek and mild bank official can suddenly read minds.

Too bad the heavy hand of Standards and Practices (censorship) was so active in 1961, because this episode has a lot of humorous potential. However, as things stands, the show is pretty tame with only a couple of faintly humorous highlights. Dick York gets the most from the material with his mugging and eye-popping bits, showing again what a skillful light comedian he was. Too bad that director James Sheldon adds nothing to the mild results-- maybe if he had directed the characters do something mildly outrageous a more memorable half-hour would have resulted. Anyway, at least the conclusion is sweetly satisfying, and-- in reference to the coin-- metaphysically appropriate.


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