Star Trek: Voyager (1995–2001)
7.8/10
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9 user 5 critic

Infinite Regress 

Voyager comes in contact with Borg technology which causes Seven of Nine to display multiple personalities.

Director:

David Livingston

Writers:

Gene Roddenberry (based upon "Star Trek" created by), Rick Berman (created by) | 5 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Kate Mulgrew ... Capt. Kathryn Janeway
Robert Beltran ... Cmdr. Chakotay
Roxann Dawson ... Lt. B'Elanna Torres
Robert Duncan McNeill ... Lt. Tom Paris
Ethan Phillips ... Neelix
Robert Picardo ... The Doctor
Tim Russ ... Lt. Tuvok
Jeri Ryan ... Seven of Nine
Garrett Wang ... Ensign Harry Kim
Scarlett Pomers ... Naomi Wildman
Neil Maffin ... Ven
Erica Mer ... Human Girl
Majel Barrett ... Voyager Computer (voice)
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Storyline

Seven of Nine begins to exhibit multiple personalities from a wide range of disparate species. The culprit? An ailing Borg "Vinculum" broadcasting a neural interlink frequency from the center of a debris field from an exploded Borg cube. As the crew try to dismantle it, Seven's neutral pattern dissipates, allowing other personalities to take over. Tuvok steps in just as an unfamiliar alien culture challenges Voyager for the Vinculum. Written by statmanjeff

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

47 reference: according to Naomi Wildman, there are 47 sub-orders in the Prime Directive. See more »

Goofs

When the reflections of the little girl and the Klingon are seen at the same time that Seven can be seen, the movements of the reflections are not in sync with Seven's movements. See more »

Quotes

Seven of Nine: [as Maryl, with an unconscious crewman on the floor] Did I do something bad?
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Connections

Referenced in Star Trek: Discovery: Project Daedalus (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Star Trek: Voyager - Main Title
Written by Jerry Goldsmith
Performed by Jay Chattaway
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User Reviews

 
Jeri Ryan Can Act!
28 April 2012 | by johnjohnson68510See all my reviews

Until this episode I was always a little doubtful about Jeri Ryan's acting ability, wondering if she could only do one note: Imperial bitchiness. Not that I don't like her Borgian disdain for non-scientific and imperfect humans. Or that high-minded carriage of her cat-suited Barbie-doll body. But in this episode, as her Borg implant fractures her into multiple personalities, she gets a huge range of characterizations to perform, and she handles them well. And this script has a handful of clever complications en route to her healing that make it an enjoyable installment. It ends kind of quickly, but it is one of the better episodes, IMHO.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Klingon

Release Date:

25 November 1998 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby | Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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