Star Trek (1966–1969)
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The Return of the Archons 

Seeking the answer to a century-old mystery, Kirk and crew encounter a vacantly peaceful society under a 6000-year autocratic rule that kills all those it can't absorb.

Director:

Joseph Pevney

Writers:

Boris Sobelman (teleplay by), Gene Roddenberry (story by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
William Shatner ... Capt. Kirk
Leonard Nimoy ... Mr. Spock
Harry Townes ... Reger
Torin Thatcher ... Marplon
DeForest Kelley ... Dr. McCoy
Brioni Farrell ... Tula
Sid Haig ... First Lawgiver
Charles Macaulay Charles Macaulay ... Landru
Jon Lormer ... Tamar
Morgan Farley ... Hacom
Karl Held Karl Held ... Lindstrom (as Christopher Held)
George Takei ... Sulu
James Doohan ... Scott
Nichelle Nichols ... Uhura
Sean Morgan Sean Morgan ... O'Neil
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Storyline

The Enterprise travels to Beta III to learn the fate of the U.S.S. Archon, gone missing a century earlier. One member of the landing party disappears, and one returns in a strangely blissful state. Kirk beams down with another landing party; amidst the chaos of "Festival" their hosts asks if they are "Archons." To learn more, Kirk must convince Betan citizens to disobey Landru, the man who has ruled them for 6,000 years - or find those who already resist. But with the Lawgivers everywhere, that task is going to be difficult... Written by CommanderBalok

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 February 1967 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The location scenes for this episode were filmed at the 40 Acres backlot in Culver City, the same place where Star Trek: Miri (1966) and Star Trek: The City on the Edge of Forever (1967) were shot. Best known for their use as Mayberry in The Andy Griffith Show (1960), the sets on this section of the backlot were originally constructed to portray 19th century Atlanta for Gone with the Wind (1939). See more »

Goofs

When Kirk records his Captain's Log for star date 3157.4, he's in a holding cell without any Starfleet equipment, yet he enters his log, reporting on the attack of his ship. (Scott could have done this, but not Captain Kirk.) See more »

Quotes

Lindstrom: Well, this is simply ridiculous. A bunch of stone-age characters running around in robes...
Mr. Spock: And apparently commanding powers far beyond our comprehension. Not simple. Not ridiculous. Very, very dangerous.
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Connections

Referenced in The Purge (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Theme From Star Trek
Written by Alexander Courage
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User Reviews

 
"You will be Absorbed"
23 April 2013 | by XweAponXSee all my reviews

This episode spot-on delivers a fist to the face of Religious EXTREMISM. And I hope, it broke some noses in the process.

Extremism is not limited to any particular religion, it can infect any of the worlds great religions. And much like The "Chronicles of Riddick" - If an extremist cannot convert you, they will probably try to kill you.

The idea that the absolute truth is only available to those who believe in one particular religion, is folly and fallacy, and maybe apostasy. And just like the planet Beta III in this episode, we see what happens to a society when all creative incentive is forbidden to the membership and only allowed to the leadership - The society which is based on the religion becomes stagnant.

This difficult-to-watch Star Trek Original Series episode shows how such a society will look, the membership, while outwardly proclaiming peace and Joy, have neither. They are tightly controlled, and Law is upheld by Fear Alone.

Taken one step further, the leadership of this stagnation is a machine! And so we have here the very first Computer-Confounding of James T Kirk's career. He becomes an expert in the destruction of computers using illogic, up to and including V'Ger. So maybe this is not as funny as they way he did it in "I, Mudd" - But the process he uses is very much the same.

On a Side-Note, Jon Lormer, who plays the Illusion "Dr Haskins" in "The Cage/The Menagerie" is "Tamar" - The First casualty of this episode at the hands of "Landru" (Charles Macaulay).


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