"Star Trek" The Devil in the Dark (TV Episode 1967) Poster

(TV Series)

(1967)

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8/10
That's No Devil - That's a Horta!
Bogmeister29 July 2006
I sympathized with the plight of the first man, Schmitter, we see killed in this episode. He reminded me of the trepidation associated with being a lone security guard at night somewhere - the type of work I did briefly about 20 years ago. Of course, I was never in danger of being burned to a crisp, as the colony chief (Lynch) is fond of describing. The monster in the dark here, murdering members of a deep mining colony, creates a scary impression in the first act. We don't really see it in the early scenes and, as many of us realize, the best monsters are sometimes left to the imagination. 'Big and shaggy' is one voiced description, but it actually turns out to resemble a big, lumpy pepperoni pizza, skittering along the ground like a silicon centipede - a limitation of the show's budget, unfortunately. This also shows in the latest matte painting, famous to Trek fans, the only way to convey a long shot of the mining operations.

But, the whole theme of this episode is about what's on the inside, rather than outward appearances, anyway. Sure, this Horta, a newly-discovered silicon-based life-form, looks like a mindless monster at first glance. Thanks to Spock's telepathic ability (probably the best use of a Vulcan mind meld for plot purposes), we learn it's a highly intelligent, even sophisticated creature. Besides Spock's instrumental use of his talent, McCoy gets to supersede his usual medical routine - healing a creature resembling rocks or asbestos. He also gets to utter one of his most famous lines, "I'm a doctor, not a bricklayer!" I found it very true-to-life in his scene where he exults in his success, though he's unable to get Kirk to share in his enthusiasm - Kirk's too busy organizing results. The episode throws unexpected turns in character & motivation at the audience as the story progresses; Spock champions the need to possibly preserve this discovered life as Kirk takes his usual stand on preventing the deaths of any red-shirts (no half measures, as in "The Man Trap"). But later, it's Kirk who, for some reason, holds back on firing a killing blast, as if the heat of the hunt had worn off and he'd had time to reflect on Spock's point (I believe it was during this episode's filming that Shatner learned his father had died). Uncharacteristic for most of the first season, this has a happy ending. The conflict stems from the needs of basic capitalism, such as meeting standard quotas, versus protecting the natural environment and its inhabitants - a space age version of protecting owls from the tractors of modern advancement. Somehow, despite many killings and a sense that everything could go to hell at any moment with one raised phaser, Kirk and Spock manage to broker an agreement which satisfies everyone. I guess people and silicates are more reasonable in the 23rd century.
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8/10
Still a favorite after all these years
mstomaso13 May 2007
Kirk and the crew are visiting a federation mining colony on a remote planet rich in mineral resources. The Devil in the Dark is the Horta, a very unusual silicon based life-form which tunnels through solid rock. The Horta has been killing miners and, it is decided, must be destroyed. But how?

It is hard to continue this review without writing a spoiler, so instead I simply concentrate on the technical aspects of the episode and touch on its themes. The special effects are OK, but many of the scenes with the Horta look a little absurd. The acting is fairly average for TOS. Some of the miners are a little awkward. Nimoy has the most difficult role of all in Devil in the Dark, and he pulls it off well.

Why is this still a favorite of mine?

Devil in the Dark is really an anthropological and ecological morality play disguised as an adventure. More than many episodes of this great TV series, it brings home the importance of maintaining an open mind and at least some degree of empathy toward others. Plus, it involves one of the most interesting, if not probable, plot twists in the original series.

Enjoy!
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7/10
"I'm a doctor, not a bricklayer"!
classicsoncall2 November 2010
Warning: Spoilers
Well now, I've seen some cheesy looking monsters in my time. Most of them came from 1959 'Z' grade sci-fi flicks like "Attack of the Giant Leeches", "The Giant Gila Monster" and that real scary lobster silhouette in "Teenagers From Outer Space". But this Horta just takes the cake. Seriously, what were they thinking when they came up with this design?

Yet on another level, this episode does a nice job of exploring the unknown and presenting the Enterprise crew with a choice to react with animal instinct or take a more systematic approach to find out what was happening on Janus VII. Captain Kirk is particularly effective here in the way he comes to the side of the Horta. But I would like to know what Shatner and Nimoy were REALLY thinking when Spock went into that Vulcan mind meld on the creature. Is there a Star Trek outtakes reel?

Then there's Bones - 'Yeah, you heard me, beam me down a hundred pounds of concrete and a trowel. I've got work to do'. I have to say, that was actually a quite creative resolution to the story of an injured crawling rock and her unhatched brood. I don't believe that whole fibrous asbestos/silicon based life form idea was ever used before or since. You have to hand it to Roddenberry and his writers here, they boldly went and never looked back with this one.
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10/10
True Roddenberry
gmzewski12 October 2006
Warning: Spoilers
Of all the episodes of all series, this one holds the closest to Roddenberry's original tenet. According to the book THE MAKING OF STAR TREK, in Roddenberry's writer's guide to his story writers, he states that any alien creature, no matter how hideously ugly, impossible to believe, benign or malicious, MUST hold some semblance of humanity that the TV viewing public can empathize with and/or relate to. Devil In The Dark's HORTA, which resembles nothing more or less than a large blob of cow dung, is a mother protecting her babies, those ball-shaped silicon nodules the miners keep finding throughout the mine passages and destroying, because they have no idea what they are! This is one of my absolute favorite episodes if only for that!
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8/10
A fine episode
intp23 June 2014
Warning: Spoilers
I thought this was one of the best episodes of the first season. Curiously, Spock is the one, not McCoy, who is the most compassionate and concerned about life, here, at least initially, although Kirk ends up being the one who pushes hardest for communication and a peaceful resolution to the conflict. It seemed a bit odd to give McCoy the job of healing the creature near the end-- it seems like that would be a job better left to an engineer like Mr. Scott, since it was more an issue of materials science than medicine; but I guess they had to give McCoy some important task to do.

Unlike some of the early episodes, this one did not feel padded; the pacing worked very well, with a real and serious threat (hostile life form, immune to standard phaser fire), a significant practical problem (the halting of mining operations critical to many Federation planets), and a careful investigation coordinated by Kirk. I'm also glad that the miners were portrayed fairly sympathetically; once they realize what they've done, they feel remorse and are motivated to make amends.

The episode was also a fascinating early example of environmentalist concerns: industrial activity that threatened to destroy a native creature and its natural habitat. Here, the solution worked out quite nicely for everyone, unlike the 'real world' where, more often than not, there are definite 'winners' and 'losers' economically, when environmental issues are involved. One could argue that protecting the environment is better for everyone in the long run; but someone whose livelihood is at stake might not see it that way, which is understandable enough.
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10/10
"The devil in the dark" is still my favourite episode!
joshi_359222 November 2009
This may not be the most exiting or incredible episode they've made, but in my opinion it remains as one of Star Trek and the Sci-Fi genre's most original episodes. Most ideas from retro Sci-Fi series especially including Star Trek has been reused several times, this one the other hand remains mostly as a one time triumph. This among the episodes that impressed me the most towards the end.

Another thing I like with this episode is how it has accomplished to create such and exiting and captivating story with such few special affects. Now without criticizing the episode I must admit the effects are very dated, but then again what can you expect from a TV show from 1967? But still the creature ("Horta") in this episode is basically just a carpet with some coloured rubber on it. Yet you forget this after about 1 minute and you only start thinking about it as what it's supposed to be. Also the caves don't exactly look like rock, but again you forget it after a few minutes. This episode is a living proof on how good acting and a good story, can make you ignore the visual effects.

The acting from the main cast is as usual great. This episode features the series second mind meld by Spock and is one of my favourites. So to say it simple Leonard Nimoy is definitely a scene stealer here, and his acting is excellent. Not that Kirk or Bones don't get their share of the episode but Spock is the most intriguing in this one. i like the fact that the episode is not about one specific character but evolves around the trio handling an alien problem. Also it's nice to see an episode who doesn't only happen on the Enterprise.

Like most Star Trek episodes this episode tells us to have an open mind. I won't spoil the story, but evolves around what in the start seems like a typical monster story. It has killed several humans and therefore must be killed. But is that really all there is to it? I can assure you that the explanation in the end, will not disappoint you. This is still my favourite Star Trek TOS episode and i give it a 10/10.
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8/10
The Devil in the Dark
Scarecrow-8810 December 2011
Warning: Spoilers
Loose within a cavernous location is a creature that attacks scientists, burning them "to a crisp". The Enterprise is commissioned to go to the planet and find out what it is that has killed over 50 men and why. Janus 6 is the name for the planet and a long-existing mining colony is present, their personnel those who have fallen victim to the mysterious creature. Once Kirk, Spock, and McCoy beam down to the planet, the creature actually "steals" a main circulating pump which provides life support, heating, and other life-sustaining functions for the mining colony so it seems that they're dealing with a smart alien life form, not just some primeval killing machine. Without a circulating pump in the power reactor, it will go "super critical" leading to a radioactive catastrophe. Spock gives it some thought and considers the possibility of a silicon-based life form with such a hard outer shell it could withstand the blast from phaser1 (the only kind of phasers used on the Janus colony planet by personnel) although Bones scoffs at such a staggering diagnosis since a silicon life form has always been seen as physiologically impossible. Why would the life form steal such a much-needed device from the colony, killing the personnel, after no activity towards them for fifty years? It might have something to do with thousands of "silicon nodules" found spread throughout the cavernous tunnels made by the acidic, corrosive secretions from the fast-moving bulky creature. Spock, through intense tri-corder readings, believes that this silicon creature could be the last of its kind and killing it would be a crime against science.

With a cheesy looking monster (right out of "The Creeping Terror" and those of its ilk) and sets (the cavernous setting looks really cheap, but that's par for the course during this era of television sci-fi before sophisticated effects and sets), "The Devil in the Dark" could've easily had been one of those campy, easily mocked episodes of Star Trek, but thanks to a strong script and intriguing ideas it goes in a thoroughly pleasant direction, with some fascinating developments (this episode asks us who really is the monster, the Horta or the miners; not to mention, the end result when a proposition is offered to settle the differences between the Horta and the miners) providing us with a creature (named the Horta) that isn't just a rampaging killing machine but has reasons for its actions. This episode features a Vulcan mind meld which provides a "meeting of the minds" allowing Kirk to know what the Horta is feeling/thinking, as well as, the hilarious line by Spock after Kirk claims he's becoming more human all the time: "Captain I see no reason to stand here and be insulted." How McCoy attends to a serious wound on the Horta is also quite a remarkable feat as is Scotty's engineering magic keeping the reactor going with bits of throwaway parts. While not one of my personal favorites of the series, I understand why so many have such high regard for "The Devil in the Dark" and I furthermore like that the title may not necessarily refer to the Horta.

"I'm a doctor, not a bricklayer."
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"Just as any mother would fight to save her children..."
Blueghost4 June 2009
In 1975 a friend of the family took me to a local JC in Sacramento for one of the first "Star Trek" conventions. I remember someone had taken some electrical tape and spelled out on the floor in the foyer at the convention entrance "NO KILL I".

The homage paid by this act reflects the importance of the social trend and awareness happening at the time. The country (the western world in fact) had just come off of one social upheaval in the midst of the Cold War, and was entering another. Trek was ahead of the curve by telling another great parable regarding not just a conservationist message, not just an environmental message, but one that levels a finger at mankind in his treatment of other living creatures.

This episode hits empathetic folks on a gut level. My mother included (or especially I should say), for while watching this episode with me (one of the few times she and I watched Trek together) she sternly agreed with Captain Kirk when Shatner's character berates Jarvis for the wanton and irresponsible acts of destruction.

It's not just a warning for today's companies and their forefathers, however still relevant and timely. It's more than that. It's a future warning to mankind, and any sentient who would mindlessly exploit that of which they knew nothing.

Another review comments on the thesping by Shatner and Nimoy. I agree that it's high caliber. The matte painting of the mining facility is what it is, as is the Horta itself. It is, after all, 1960's sci-fi TV. Even so, I'm hard pressed to find better props used in today's TV offerings (part of the reason I don't watch too much contemporary television anymore). Good shots, good dialog, good story, and a profound theme.

Enjoy.
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8/10
The Horta, not life as we know it
bkoganbing1 September 2013
Leonard Nimoy's Vulcan mind meld proves of invaluable assistance in this Star Trek episode. Life may not look anything like it does on earth and it may not even function bodily as we do on earth. But life can be found in the strangest of places.

Consider this planet which looks to be made of solid rock, yet something is killing off the miners in Ken Lynch's crew. Which is why he sent a distress call and the Enterprise responds.

Lynch's men are not being killed, in fact they're being burned to a crisp. It's being done by a creature we learn calls itself a Horta and to our eyes it's not aesthetically pleasing.

This Star Trek story reduces life to a problem of communication. The Horta has a very good reason for doing what it does.

It's a good moral this story has, all we need in the Universe is better communication.
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8/10
A meeting (melding) of the minds
Mr-Fusion4 August 2017
Enter the Horta, possibly the show's ugliest prop, but still manages to convey an alien presence. Or in this case, a monster, one who's terrorizing the grunts in a mining colony. It's an extermination mission and that episode-long buildup is how the creature takes on a life of its own, no matter the level of production values. And it's a story of hard-won tolerance, thanks to that twist ending.

But it's also a good showcase for the Kirk-Spock-McCoy relationship. Isolated from the rest of the crew, this mystery is left to them to solve. All kidding aside, it's a great episode all around.

8/10
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9/10
A new form of life
Tweekums13 June 2015
Warning: Spoilers
The Enterprise is called in to help when a mysterious creature starts killing members of a mining colony. The colony is extracting essential minerals but its existence is threatened by the creature; especially when it takes a vital part of their reactor's cooling mechanism; proving that it is intelligent. After seeing how the creature moves through solid rock and fails to register on any scanners Spock speculates that unlike every other known lifeform this creature is based on silicon rather than carbon. Applying this theory they recalibrate their instruments and discover that there is a single silicon based lifeform in the vicinity of the mine. Phasers have limited effect on it but Spock and Kirk eventually manage to wound it. Eventually the creature is cornered and Spock attempts a mind-meld leading to him learning about the nature of the creature and why it has been attacking the miners.

This is a classic Star Trek episode; it explores the idea that there may be non-carbon based lifeforms and raises some environmental issues. The creature effects may be laughable by today's standards but that doesn't spoil the story and it avoids the cliché of having a humanoid lifeform. Leonard Nimoy puts in a good performance as Spock; especially in the mind-meld scene. While this is a fairly dramatic episode there are some good moments of humour; most notably when Dr McCoy is asked to treat the creature's phaser wound. Overall a quality episode that I'm sure most fans of the series will enjoy.
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5/10
I guess I am one of the few who didn't love this one,...
MartinHafer6 December 2006
The Enterprise is on a mining planet and all the action takes place in tunnels and chambers underground. There are also very few character--and most of the time it's just Kirk and Spock mucking about in the dark. Because of this the episode seems claustrophobic and static. There, they encounter a weird creature named the Horta and Spock makes some sort of love connection with it using his mind meld.

This is one of the higher-rated episodes of the first season of Star Trek and I must be one of the dissenters. I really have no idea why others have embraced this mediocre episode--I noticed nothing particularly memorable about it--though perhaps some environmentalists were excited by the "save the species" aspects of the film. The plot is just okay, the dialog isn't particularly interesting and the creature looks pretty silly! In fact, when I see the Horta moving about, I can't help but think about some kids or dwarf underneath it trying to make the monster look scary! Yeah, sure.
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10/10
Excellent Star Trek; one of my favorites
karn6 November 2014
Everybody likes to say how cheesy the monster looks. But I'll be honest. It still gave me nightmares at age 10.

I also didn't like this episode much as a kid because we hardly see the Enterprise, and how can that be Star Trek? Eventually I learned that good science fiction, like all drama, is about characters and ideas, not sets and costumes and special effects. And so "Devil in the Dark" is now one of my favorite Star Trek episodes.

I sometimes wonder if it was done as penance for "The Man Trap". That episode also featured an intelligent creature, native to the planet and the last of its species, who began murdering humans for no apparent reason. But that episode doesn't fit the Star Trek philosophy at all, while this one is among the very best examples of that philosophy in action.
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7/10
Silicone Based Lifeforms
Rainey-Dawn6 January 2017
Season 1, episode 25. The Enterprise is called to Janus 6, a mining colony there are being attacked and killed by a mysterious creature. Kirk, Spock and McCoy beam down to the planet's surface with a small away crew to investigate. Upon arrival they met with Chief Engineer Vanderberg who tells them what has been going on in more detail. The search begins for this creature that can kill a person with a strong corrosive substance. The crew learn that the miners have found seemly useless silicon nodules and the creature is a silicone based lifeform. Kirk and Spock search for the creature while McCoy beams back up to the ship. Kirk and Spock find the creature hurt and Spock conducts a Vulcan mind-meld with it to learn more about it - it is called a Horta. McCoy is called back down later to help this unusual patient while the miners are ready to destroy it.

An episode that is hard to forget. I used to describe the Horta as a bubbly burnt pizza-like creature but watching it again all these years later I would say it looks more like a meatball with sauce on it. That's OK though because the Horta thinks that humans are hideous looking but the Vulcan is pleasant looking to it. lol.

7/10
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10/10
Getting to the heart of the matter...
poe4263 July 2012
Warning: Spoilers
A revelation the first tiem I saw it (as a kid), THE DEVIL IN THE DARK boasts the best performance ever by a non-humanoid creature on STAR TREK. Although its motives and emotions are conveyed through the always capable Leonard Nimoy, the Horta still sorta comes across as a likable enough critter (the fact that it's a mother-to-be may have something to do with this: she kills only because she's given no other choice). It's our own knee-jerk reaction(s) to its appearance (and the appearance of its young) that results in loss of life; when contact is established, things work out smoothly enough. A very pro-lifeform episode. (It also inspired a short story by Yours Truly, THE HEART OF THE MATTER.)
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9/10
Phasers set for silicon and on maximum
johnsubs115 April 2010
Warning: Spoilers
I really can't say this was one of my favorite episodes but it was interesting. It was the type that left a lasting impression good or bad who can say, it was kinda of scary when I first saw it in the 60's or 70's. The show can sort of suck you in even though it is cheesy by current standards. Sure the Horta looks like an mutant supreme pizza with the Italian sausage, pepperoni, and lots of cheese. The sound effects of the monster in the first encounter are reminiscent of the life status monitor in sick bay. The philosophical arguments are there but don't overwhelm the entertainment value of the show, more of a subplot. The script and acting aren't that bad for the mid 1960's. The eggs are closer to a pearl than an egg, but it is a silicon based life form so what do you expect (regarding a previous reviewers comments). I was surprised to hear that Phasers had a silicon setting, it was convenient though ineffective even on maximum. Funny thing was Spock could mind meld it by touching it but it burned its way through the rock as we walk through the air. The Doctor healing the Horta with 100 pounds of thermal concrete was cute. "By golly Jim I'm beginning to believe i can cure a rainy day" was an nice touch from Bones.
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8/10
Rhymes with "Torta"
rhinocerosfive-124 October 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Hey, it's only TV. Sure, it's STAR TREK, the most beloved bla bla, and this is a great one, but it's all relative. What it boils down to is a guy in elf ears grooving with a swatch of pizza-colored shag rug.

There's a kind of THIRD MAN noirishness to the tunnel hunt, and it's creepier than many episodes of what is after all one of the better TV shows. The suspense is actually suspenseful. The peril really feels perilous. As a little kid I think I cried when Spock told me that this hideous creature was as sad, scared and horrified as the people it was eating. This was one of my early lessons in empathy, a lesson reinforced by the EMPATH episode which was, if less thrilling, even more melancholy.

What bothered me when I was five was that this thing, which looks like meat and tomato barf, somehow actually consists more or less of rock. Now that kind of choice might seem visionary, a hippie designer's idea of through-the-looking-glass one-universism, but it might also just smack of the drug era.
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8/10
Spock Mindmelds with a Giant Meatball
Samuel-Shovel1 May 2018
Warning: Spoilers
In "The Devil in the Dark", the Enterprise arrives at a mining colony on Janus VI in order to help kill a beast that has been killing miners, jeopardizing the exportation of the ever important pergium. As the miners continue drilling deeper, it seems to be upsetting the monster more and more. Spock soon discerns that the monster is silicon-based, not the type of lifeform that the crew is familiar with! It turns out that the miners have stumbled across the last of the Horta as she attempts to protect her batch of eggs, killing the miners in self-defense. Spock and Kirk ask the miners to coexist with the lifeform in a symbiotic relationship.

The plot of "don't judge a beast by its cover" has been around since at least when Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein but this is a fun retelling of it. At the beginning, everyone abhors the Horta; they fear it, loathe it. But Spock's mindmeld and Kirk's understanding soon changes this tune for everyone. People are often afraid of what they don't understand. This episode reveals to us that, if we hope to find peace with what we don't understand or take issuance with, the first step is communication.

I love Spock's playful side. It's at full force in the closing scene as he compliments himself through the interpretation of the Horta. I think it perfectly encapsulates his character. Another fine episode!
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9/10
Love the episode
mhubbard-546574 January 2017
Warning: Spoilers
This is an episode with a slightly different premise. A manufacturing community is under assault with multiple unprovoked deaths from an apparent monster, at least from their viewpoint. The problem has escalated as they have pursued their mining operations to lower levels. Our heroes from Starfleet are called in to evaluate the situation. They suspect alternate life forms and start investigating the possibilities.

This is a great episode highlighting Mr Spock's metaphysical talents and the human value system that makes the series interesting to watch. To add some spice, Spock and Kirk spar a little about whether to kill the creature.The worst part is probably the appearance of the creature herself, who looks a lot like a bad broccoli casserole circa 1967.

Otherwise, good show.
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7/10
The Pizza of Death? A terrible "monster suit!"
mike4812826 July 2014
Warning: Spoilers
The "monster" in this case, is man, as nuclear miners unknowingly destroy hundreds of eggs from the burrowing monster called a "Horta". It resembles both a peperoni pizza and a plate of spaghetti and meatballs with yellow cheese poured over it. It obviously has a stuntman inside of it, creeping along. A good sci-fi concept somewhat made somewhat laughable by a really "cheesy-looking" rubber suit! Spock does a mind-meld with it and Dr. MCCoy repairs its mortal wounds with silicon patching cement! Not as bad as it sounds, but unintentionally funny to me. The Horta finds the appearance of man as revolting as its appearance is to us. The miners will now live in peace as the Horta and its millions of babies will now burrow mining tunnels instead of killing the miners with its corrosive acid. Too bad the budget wasn't bigger. The monster could have been more convincing!
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7/10
A lot of good and a lot of bad to this one
chrisbaird-ma7 February 2013
Warning: Spoilers
Captain Kirk and Spock try to protect a mining settlement from a monster acid-spewing alien that kills 50 men, but in the end decide to save the monster instead. While the suspense is enjoyable, the setting in the mine is new and intriguing, and the science is creative, this episode just stinks too strongly of Save-the-Coyotes environmentalism - you know, the kind that places the life of some animal above the life of dozens of human. The show tries to humanize the murderous monster by making it an expectant mother. Guess what - tape worms are also mothers. That's doesn't mean I should surrender my life to them or even try to understand them. This new-age nonsense reaches a crescendo when the guy with pointed ears embraces the pizza-patterned shag carpet creature, their souls meld into one, and they spout surreal poetry together.

The best part of this episode is the alien's biology (not it's appearance). Too many shows have aliens that are essentially humans. If the mosquito under my nose is nothing like a human, why should a creature from a distant planet be humanoid? Indeed, why should it even by carbon-based or live in the air?
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Fine plot, bad monster even for a TV show...
rixrex7 June 2009
I'd rate this as a good Star Trek thanks to the typically literate plot, and of course great cast as always, but the execution of the monster is really sub-par even for TV shows from this time. It was great watching as a kid when first televised, but then we thought every episode of Lost in Space was great too.

In fact the monster here is just too reminiscent of that other show, and really too much like the infamous creature in The Creeping Terror. I really think someone like Stan Winston would have done a much better job even with the same basic creature design. And those silicon eggs!? At least they could have had a textured surface, not perfectly smooth and shiny like a kid's play-ball or balloon. Well, even Star Trek has blunders. Other than this, a fine episode.
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you're a healer..
merelyaninnuendo20 March 2018
Star Trek

The Devil In The Dark

A cultural hub and by far one of the most loved and respected tale, Star Trek is created by Gene Roddenberry who wrote this brilliant concept, ahead of its time and is probably why it still doesn't fail to entertain us after these many years. It was written "for the future" in many aspects as it even though is smarter, wiser and powerful it still seeks for emotion and the force that binds it all. The relation between Spock and Kirk; despite of its premise, is the most human thing in this majestic tale where the adventures are endless. Encountering this original series, at this stage makes the execution look petty and a bit loose (the small technical aspects can be negotiated) but the writing is smart, gripping and hence completely overpowers it.

Unlike any other hit series, it only has 3 seasons so luckily it means that they will be covering up all their ideas within it until they are satisfied. As it often happens, the first season is always promising and has potential (or else it won't lift up for further more seasons) in it and is utilized with fine detailed work like focusing on different new breeds and characters bonding through this journey.

The Devil In The Dark has a good old tale of the protagonist v the monster retold in an updater future version so how can it not work especially if there is "spock" drama in it; the whole mind reading sequence was a nice touch in this.
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7/10
Silicon Creature
elo-equipamentos1 May 2017
I never watched Star Trek until the DVD release,unfortunately it wasn't available in Globo TV,that was the lone TV company on my local Village. But Star Trek hook my heart since the beginning,in this episode one's most odd of the entire first season.The Enterprise arrived in the planet Janus 6 which is mining colony,a strange creature are killing workers in the underground...now the Enterprise's Crew has to find this creature until it make more victims....Spock suspect that such creature shall be made some kind of stone called Silicon whose is plentiful in this planet,when they finally faces the creature Spock get a communication using your Vulkan skills...interesting but weird story indeed,besides it's Star Trek.
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My favorite piece of TV ever.
Colin-630-93581127 November 2016
Star Trek is the best that TV has ever had to offer,the 3 people of Kirk,Spock and McCoy make one perfect human being,in all it's complexities,so it's already above most other TV. 'Devil' remains my favorite episode and sums up what Star Trek is all about,the underlining theme here is 'Don't judge a book by it's cover' and it carries that idea into something complex and ultimately moving. Kirk's character arc is strongest of all here,it's no surprise to find that Shatener regards it as one of the best,and indeed, his "first to touch her,dies" moment is my favorite moment in all TV,it shows how compassion and common sense can win the argument,just brilliant.
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