Seinfeld (1989–1998)
9.0/10
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5 user 2 critic

The Yada Yada 

George's new girlfriend keeps including "Yada Yada" in her stories. Jerry is offended by Tim Whatley's Jewish jokes. Elaine tries to help her friends adopt a baby. Kramer and Mickey fight over two women.

Director:

Andy Ackerman

Writers:

Larry David (created by), Jerry Seinfeld (created by) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Jerry Seinfeld ... Jerry Seinfeld
Julia Louis-Dreyfus ... Elaine Benes
Michael Richards ... Cosmo Kramer
Jason Alexander ... George Costanza
Jill St. John ... Mrs. Abbott
Robert Wagner ... Dr. Abbott
Debra Messing ... Beth
Bryan Cranston ... Tim Whatley
Danny Woodburn ... Mickey Abbott
Suzanne Cryer ... Marcy
Stephen Caffrey ... Arnie
Henry Woronicz ... Father Curtis
Monica Lacy ... Julie
Ali Marsh ... Karen
David Chandler David Chandler ... Brian
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Storyline

George's new girlfriend often fills in her stories with the expression yada-yada leaving out much of the detail. Jerry tells him she's being concise but not knowing what's going starts to drive George crazy. Jerry meanwhile is convinced that his dentist, Tim Whatley, has converted to Judaism to he can tell Jewish jokes. When he continues to tell Catholic jokes, he even complains to Whatley's former priest. It all leads Kramer to accuse him of being an anti-Dentite. Elaine is asked by friends to be a character reference with a adoption agency but she doesn't exactly help them. Kramer and Mickey can't quite agree on which of two women they've met they'd like to date. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 April 1997 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Real-life husband and wife Robert Wagner and Jill St. John play the parents of Kramer's (Michael Richards) friend, Mickey Abbott (Danny Woodburn)). See more »

Goofs

Dentists have a pretty low suicide rate. See more »

Quotes

Jerry: Mr. Abbott.
Dr. Abbott: [Having heard about Jerry's dentist jokes] That's Dr. Abbott, D.D.S. Tim Whatley was one of my students. And if this wasn't my son's wedding day, I'd knock your teeth out, you anti-dentite bastard.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in WWE Raw: Episode #10.46 (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Lohengrin - Bridal Chorus
(uncredited)
Music by Richard Wagner
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User Reviews

i'm late on everything..
1 July 2019 | by Arth_JoshiSee all my reviews

Seinfeld

Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld, the creators, of the dream sitcom for every stand up artist is the milestone set as an example on how to use your humor as a part of narrative. The series was clearly ahead of its time and fixated within that time limit when it was aired- or maybe not even then. This is how the series both remains timeless and also fails to test against time. The concept of the series- in fact there is an episode, where the series takes an almost meta turn, whispering the secretive meeting held within the confound of NBC walls about the pitch- is to just joke, just talk, analyse with a mockery tone, bombing brutally on a subject from the most privileged position under that circumstances. There is no storyline, no character development, no arc, no rhythm to follow. Usually, a film like such becomes more than a film with such an idea; take the Life Of Brian series. And similarly the series refuses to participate in the expected or not even expected aspects of the storytelling.

There is no end, no beginning, it captures a brief period with an agenda in mind that you will have the time of your life. But this is where this coherent plan backfires. First the runtime itself. Something so monotonous cannot withhold its audience for nine years. It is simply preposterous. For the style of the joke, the humor, the vocab of these characters, if as-planned is intended to be the same, will grow natural or normal to the viewers. This makes the relationship between the viewers and the characters, similar to what the viewers have in the outer world, maybe a friend or a family member.

Basically it would never be interesting, sure some cases would come up, just as chapters does in here, but that too will carry the momentum of just that brief period of screentime. Another major challenge it faces is, in order to stay far away from the textbook sitcom structure, the character has to and does deny on getting on or blending in with the society. Now that's fine. But in order to last longer they had to create an unfair world that takes uncalled detours just for the laughs, ignoring both emotional and ethical aspect of it, resulting into a physical distance that you, as an audience, carry for the rest of the series. By the end, it gets difficult to survive and something so beloved, something so smart, Seinfeld is left under a dry heap of jokes.

The Yada Yada

It is a shocking news for sure. But then Seinfeld always comes up with a point maybe arguable maybe not, maybe completely banal, or completely flawed but it is fun to see a comedian on the other side of the chair and emotional level.


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