Science Fiction Theatre (1955–1957)
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Three Minute Mile 

Since becoming Dr. Kendall assistant, college student Britt has gained incredible strength, and can run a mile in about three minutes. A nosy reporter, along with Britt's fiance, begin ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
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Host / Narrator
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Prof. Nat Kendall
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Britt
Gloria Marshall ...
Jill Page
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Coach Shane
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Jim Dale (as Bill Henry)
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C.B. Page
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Storyline

Since becoming Dr. Kendall assistant, college student Britt has gained incredible strength, and can run a mile in about three minutes. A nosy reporter, along with Britt's fiance, begin snooping to find out what kind of "Frankenstein"-type experiments the doctor is conducting. Written by Jay Phelps <jaynashvil@aol.com>

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Drama | Sci-Fi

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Release Date:

9 November 1956 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The three minute mile is an important plot point. Two years before this episode was made a runner broke the four minute mile. While such speed is fairly common among mid-distance runners today, back in 1954 breaking that limit was a major event. Many experts had thought it beyond human limits. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Dumb Formula Episode
22 July 2013 | by See all my reviews

Martin Milner is a big football star at some university somewhere. His girlfriend and his former coach are furious at him for leaving the football team and working with a professor who is doing some mysterious research. It turns out that Milner has superhuman strength and can run a three minute mile. A reporter is determined to blow the whistle on what the professor is doing. He snoops around where he doesn't belong (a common activity in these episodes) and begins to build a case against this man (who, of course, is doing nothing wrong). Then, one of those juvenile plot elements concludes the thing. What starts out as a reasonable episode turns into a children's story.


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