Route 66 (1960–1964)
8.4/10
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Shoulder the Sky, My Lad 

Tod and Buz, working in Phoenix, Arizona as punch press operators, are befriended by their Jewish supervisor. When the kindly man is senselessly killed by muggers his 8 year old son blames ... See full summary »

Director:

David Lowell Rich

Writers:

Mort Thaw, Herbert B. Leonard (created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Martin Milner ... Tod Stiles
George Maharis ... Buz Murdock
Lili Darvas Lili Darvas ... Annie Selman
Susan Gordon ... Rosie Corbello
Michael McGreevey ... Davey Selman (as Mike McGreevey)
Edward Asner ... Carl Selman
Lisabeth Hush Lisabeth Hush ... Nancy
H.M. Wynant ... Rabbi Harris
Frank Leo Frank Leo ... Hophead
Sam Gilman ... Lieutenant Robak
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Storyline

Tod and Buz, working in Phoenix, Arizona as punch press operators, are befriended by their Jewish supervisor. When the kindly man is senselessly killed by muggers his 8 year old son blames God. Tod and Buz have different views of how to help the young man mourn and regain his faith. Written by dubchi

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Genres:

Adventure

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Hebrew

Release Date:

2 March 1962 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Phoenix, Arizona, USA See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

When David and Rosie are sitting in the railroad yard talking, the wide shot shows a string of gondolas directly behind them. Every time they cut to a closeup of David, it shows Southern Pacific boxcars directly behind him. See more »

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User Reviews

Are We Ever Really Alone
19 May 2015 | by dougdoepkeSee all my reviews

A Jewish dad befriends Buzz and Tod on the job, and so the guys get to know his family. But then Dad is murdered by muggers, leaving his son emotionally destitute and ready to reject his religious heritage. The guys want to help out but disagree on the best method, causing a rift between them.

As a drama, the entry is average, concentrating mostly on David, the son. McGreevey is fine as the bereaved boy—if he smiles at all, I didn't catch it. There's a religious subtext concerning both Judaism and Christianity that's handled fairly well, without too much sanctimony. I particularly like Ed Asner's affable dad. He makes us feel his loss almost as much as David does, and is certainly a long way from the gruff Lou Grant. I'm not sure what pretty Nancy's (Hush) purpose is, except to furnish us guys with some needed eye candy.

And, oh yes, mustn't overlook a big series strength. Namely, the good look at seedy surroundings, this time of Scottsdale AZ's industrial area. Having the guys bounce from one blue-collar locale to another in their travels furnishes glimpses of an America rarely acknowledged by glamor-bound Hollywood. Thanks so much Executive Producer Herbert B. Leonard for doing something radically different for the time.


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