Rome (2005–2007)
8.6/10
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Caesarion 

Brutus gets a chilly reception from Servilia when he returns home from Greece. In Egypt, Caesar rebukes the advisers of the boy king, Ptolemy XIII, for their presumption in eliminating ... See full summary »

Director:

Steve Shill

Writers:

John Milius (created by), William J. MacDonald (created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Ray Stevenson ... Titus Pullo
Kevin McKidd ... Lucius Vorenus
Polly Walker ... Atia of the Julii
Kenneth Cranham ... Pompey Magnus
Lindsay Duncan ... Servilia of the Junii
Tobias Menzies ... Marcus Junius Brutus
Kerry Condon ... Octavia of the Julii
Indira Varma ... Niobe (credit only)
Max Pirkis ... Gaius Octavian (credit only)
Nicholas Woodeson ... Posca
David Bamber ... Marcus Tullius Cicero
Suzanne Bertish ... Eleni
James Purefoy ... Mark Antony
Ciarán Hinds ... Gaius Julius Caesar
Shaka Bunsie Shaka Bunsie ... Hutto
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Storyline

Brutus gets a chilly reception from Servilia when he returns home from Greece. In Egypt, Caesar rebukes the advisers of the boy king, Ptolemy XIII, for their presumption in eliminating Pompey and demands the man who killed him. Caesar decides to intervene in the dispute between Ptolemy and his sister-wife, Cleopatra, to ensure both Rome's grain supply and his own access to Egypt's treasure. Antony, in an unusual show of prudence, advises against this with only half a legion in Alexandria and Cato and Scipio still at large in Africa. Caesar sends Vorenus and Pullo to rescue Cleopatra from house-arrest and escort her to Alexandria. Upon meeting Vorenus and Pullo, the narcissistic, opium-smoking teenage Cleopatra decides that her only hope of survival is to seduce Caesar and she compels Vorenus and Pullo to help smuggle her into the city first by unsuccessfully attempting to seduce Vorenus, but she has better luck with Pullo. Servilia's relationship with Octavia deepens beyond friendship... Written by Tom D.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 October 2005 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

HD Vision Studios See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Since Cleopatra was not a citizen of Rome (although Egypt was a Roman province), technically Caesar was not committing adultery. See more »

Goofs

After King Ptolemy XIII's advisers are executed, there is a shot outside the main gates we see the spikes. Lucius Septimius's head is missing, though we see it mounted there earlier in the episode. See more »

Quotes

[Vorenus is commanded to see Cleopatra]
Charmian: Majesty commands you will enter her.
Lucius Vorenus: I do not understand.
Charmian: You have coitus with her.
Lucius Vorenus: [Aghast] You have it wrong. Coitus means to make babies!
Charmian: Exact! So, make babies.
[Cleopatra spreads her legs in anticipation]
Charmian: Don't be scared.
[the female slave starts to undress him]
Lucius Vorenus: I'm not scared. I just cannot do what you ask. It is not... it is not in our custom. Roman men are not used by women in this way.
[...]
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Soundtracks

Rome Main Title Theme
(uncredited)
Written by Jeff Beal
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User Reviews

 
Rome- Fictional Characters
30 March 2007 | by FlashrockjohnnySee all my reviews

Kitsalonica-1's version of Caesar's events in Egypt matches the version I remember reading from so-called historical documents. The fact Pullo fathered a child of Cleopatra is ludicrous. Cleopatra was in need of powerful friends at the time and she would have "saved" herself for an important man to father a child. As for being a virgin....probably not! The fictional characters are important to the story. Most Roman flicks only concentrate on well known historical figures and situations. Other people had lives and were affected by the actions of these historical figures. It is entertaining to witness the actions of other people in this TV show about Rome. Long live Rome!


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