Profiles in Courage (1964–1965)

Governor John M. Slaton 

The story of Gov. John Slaton of Georgia, who in the early 1900s pardoned Leo Frank, who had been convicted of and sentenced to death for raping and murdering a young girl. Slaton believed ... See full summary »

Director:

Robert Gist

Writer:

Don Mankiewicz
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode credited cast:
Walter Matthau ... Gov. John Slaton
Betsy Jones-Moreland Betsy Jones-Moreland ... Sally
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alan Baxter ... Traine
Whit Bissell ... Myles
Michael Constantine ... Watson
Anthony Costello ... Burley
Frank Marth ... Grant
Edit

Storyline

The story of Gov. John Slaton of Georgia, who in the early 1900s pardoned Leo Frank, who had been convicted of and sentenced to death for raping and murdering a young girl. Slaton believed that Frank, who was Jewish, had been convicted not on the evidence but because of rampant anti-Semitism on the part of the prosecution and the jury. Slaton's decision outraged the public, but as it turned out, he was right--several years later it was revealed that it wasn't Frank who committed the murder but a local handyman. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Edit

Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 December 1964 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
An intriguing view of history
5 December 2006 | by shane-4See all my reviews

This episode does not appear in JFK's original Profiles in Courage, but was added (and written) later. It is not generally available in print form, although others were gathered in a subsequent paperback.

Of course, the role of John Slaton was not "paid by Walter Matthau" but "played." Thomas Watson's role in the original conviction was minimal, since he did not enter the fray until about a year after the crime (1914).

This famous trial, and its sad aftermath, is still much debated today. The 1964 TV version of events is still worth watching, although Matthau doesn't look very much like Governor Slaton. When Theodore Sorenson vetted this script, he called attention to the problem of how a dead girl could bleed in the elevator. Will we ever know what really happened on Confederate Memorial Day in 1913? Why was the watchman Newt Lee sent away from the factory at 4pm? Where was Leo Frank when Montine Stover appeared between 12:05 - 12:10pm and his office was empty? There is no final certainty, even in the original black and white.

Anyway, this episode is a reminder of how history can be viewed, and even recycled, over time. Who ultimately will be well regarded - Hugh Dorsey or John Slaton? Such incidents are always instructive, especially when they were, and still are, so controversial. We will have to await the analysis of the recently discovered documents relating to April 26, 1913.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 2 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed