The Outer Limits (1963–1965)
9.0/10
550
17 user 1 critic

Demon with a Glass Hand 

Days ago, Trent awoke with no memory of his past. Since then, sinister men have pursued him constantly. He manages to stay one step ahead of them by following the advice of his hand. Made ... See full summary »

Director:

Byron Haskin

Writer:

Harlan Ellison
Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Robert Culp ... Trent
Arlene Martel ... Consuelo Biros (as Arline Martel)
Abraham Sofaer ... Arch
Rex Holman ... Battle
Steve Harris Steve Harris ... Breech
Robert Fortier Robert Fortier ... Budge
Edit

Storyline

Days ago, Trent awoke with no memory of his past. Since then, sinister men have pursued him constantly. He manages to stay one step ahead of them by following the advice of his hand. Made of glass and apparently capable of speech, Trent's hand can answer many of his questions. But it cannot tell him who he is or why his enemies seek him until he finds all of its fingers. The only trouble is that they're in the hands of his enemies. Written by CommanderBalok

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 October 1964 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Harlan Ellison has written other stories set against the backdrop of the "Earth-Kyba War." He adapted five of these - "Run For the Stars", "Life Hutch", "The Untouchable Adolescents", "Trojan Hearse", and "Sleeping Dogs" - into the graphic novel Night and the Enemy (1987), illustrated by Ken Steacy. Also, Ellison's short story "The Human Operators" - later adapted into an episode of the new Outer Limits - is set in the same universe as this story (The Starfighters were originally built for the Earth-Kyba war). See more »

Goofs

When Trent is pursued in the alley, he crouches and moves an empty barrel to conceal himself. In the next shot, the barrel is in its original position. See more »

Quotes

Breech: I know this: you're the last man on the Earth of the future. You're the last hope of Earth.
See more »

Connections

Edited into Historias para no dormir: La Mano (1966) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
Some Inside Info
24 August 2007 | by rottresq-1See all my reviews

I'm the eldest son of the Assistant to the Producer of this episode of The Outer Limits. It is in my opinion one of the best episodes he was involved in (the last year of production). The show aired Saturday night on ABC. On the Monday morning following the show, the phone in the producer's office rang and my father answered it. The voice identified himself as Ray Bradbury and asked to speak to Ben Brady the producer. My father at first thought it was a joke. It wasn't. Ray Bradbury told Ben Brady that he had watched the show on Saturday night and wanted him to know how much he enjoyed it. Not a bad sci-fi recommend I would think. Harlon Ellison (writer) also called Ben Brady and demanded his name be removed from "that piece of S***!" My father said Ben calmed him down, a little.

Please remember when you watch the original (B&W)Outer Limits that the budget was very limited $100k an episode I think. And that was for everything. So the aliens in this episode wore bathing caps and the "set" was the old Bradbury building in downtown LA. Shot the entire thing in one night. At least the run around the stairs, elevator scenes. For what it was and when it was done, it pretty good.

People occasionally ask,"do you know where the glass hand is?" I do not. I doubt it exists today. Most props are made in multiples, I would imagine there was more than one, and based on the budget limitations of the time, probably returned to a pop rental company. One more piece of trivia - the 1964 season of Outer Limits was shot at what was then called The Executive Producers Studio on Sunset Blvd. That is the original location where Al Jolson's The Jazz Singer (the first talking motion picture)was shot, and they had preserved the original stage he used. The studio has gone through several changes of ownership/function, its now called Sunset Bronson Studios. I had many a good craft services meal there (Dad hated to cook.)


38 of 45 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 17 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Comedy Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular comedy titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed