Nova (1974– )
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Galileo's Battle for the Heavens 

In this two-hour special, NOVA celebrates the story of the father of modern science and his struggle to get Church authorities to accept the truth of his astonishing discoveries. The ... See full summary »

Director:

Peter Jones

Writer:

Dava Sobel
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Simon Callow ... Galileo
John Fraser John Fraser ... Inquistor
Cornelius Garrett Cornelius Garrett ... Ambassador (voice)
Alexa Jago ... Maria Celeste (voice)
Laura Nardi Laura Nardi ... Maria Celeste
Liev Schreiber ... Himself - Narrator
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Storyline

In this two-hour special, NOVA celebrates the story of the father of modern science and his struggle to get Church authorities to accept the truth of his astonishing discoveries. The program is based on Dava Sobel's bestselling book, Galileo's Daughter, which reveals a new side to the famously stubborn scientist-that his closest confidante was his illegitimate daughter, Sister Maria Celeste, a cloistered nun. Written by PBS Website

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Plot Keywords:

nova | reenactment | See All (2) »


Certificate:

TV-PG
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Details

Official Sites:

PBS [United States]

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 October 2002 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
Marvellous depiction of early science
1 January 2007 | by peter-wSee all my reviews

Simon Callow shines in this excellent NOVA production. It is very sympathetic to Galileo's struggle to construct a scientific view of the universe. We hear from modern experts and follow his progress towards the observation that the earth revolves about the sun, thereby coming into conflict with the political power of the time, the dreadful roman catholic church, which maintained that the sun revolved around the earth. This lead to his downfall as the faith bound church slapped him down.

It is clear that Galileo was not backward in coming forward, so we see him also as a tireless self promoter. We also learn about the alternative models of the solar system prevalent at the time, which the telescope clarified, proving the Copernican view.


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