Night Gallery (1969–1973)
7.8/10
232
9 user 3 critic

The Phantom Farmhouse/Silent Snow, Secret Snow 

Psychiatrist Joel Winter investigates the claims of his asylum patient, hippie Gideon, that a pretty girl from a nearby farm is killing his patients./The Haslemans worry when their son becomes obsessed with snow that's talking to him.

Directors:

Gene R. Kearney (as Gene Kearney), Jeannot Szwarc

Writers:

Halsted Welles (teleplay), Seabury Quinn (short story) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
David McCallum ... Dr. Joel Winter (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
Orson Welles ... Narrator (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow") (voice)
Lonny Chapman ... Father (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow")
Linda Marsh ... Mildred Squire (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
David Carradine ... Gideon (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
Lisabeth Hush Lisabeth Hush ... Mother (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow")
Ivor Francis ... Pierre (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
Radames Pera ... Paul (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow")
Ford Rainey ... The Sheriff (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
Jason Wingreen ... Doctor (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow")
Trina Parks ... Betty (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
Frances Spanier Frances Spanier ... Miss Buell (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow")
Patti Cohoon-Friedman Patti Cohoon-Friedman ... Dierdre (segment "Silent Snow, Secret Snow") (as Patti Cohoon)
Bill Quinn ... Dr. Tom (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
Gail Bonney ... Mrs. Squire (segment "The Phantom Farmhouse")
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Storyline

Psychiatrist Joel Winter investigates the claims of his asylum patient, hippie Gideon, that a pretty girl from a nearby farm is killing his patients./The Haslemans worry when their son becomes obsessed with snow that's talking to him.

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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 October 1971 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Television See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

David Carradine ("The Phantom Farmhouse") and Radames Pera ("Silent Snow, Secret Snow") would both go on to co-star on "Kung Fu" the following year. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Two Haunting Episodes
7 June 2014 | by HitchcocSee all my reviews

The rating is mostly for the second episode, although the first is interesting. In "The Phantom Farmhouse," David McCallum runs a high priced treatment center (asylum) where his clients sit on platforms in trees and say pithy things and confront each other's conditions. David Carradine is in another world, speaking 1970's slang and playing is guitar (which another patient hates). He talks constantly of a house off in the woods where a haunting young woman lives. He says to see her is to instantly fall in love with her. The natives say that all that is in that space is the leftover fireplace chimney, a well, and three gravestones. There was a terrible fire there in the past. McCallum acts under control but has a sense of curiosity and one day makes his way to the house, where there is a family and beautiful blond woman with whom he immediately falls in love. This is one of those stories where plenty of warning is given and yet the main character doesn't listen. It is quite haunting in both its visual and auditory sense. Much better than most episodes.

Conrad Aiken is a favorite of Rod Serling and here he uses one of his most famous stories, "Silent Snow, Secret Snow." This is the story of a child who appears to be autistic and the pain his parents go through to reach him. Autism was barely on the radar in those days and it's possible there is supernatural element at work. The boy sits in class in a kind of reverie as he stares at a snow globe and imagines himself standing, frolicking in a snowstorm. He is very bright but only comes out of these almost catatonic episodes when screamed at or spoken to over and over. This is indeed a haunting presentation with Orson Welles' voice-over giving it a real depth and beauty.


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