Detectives and prosecutors believe that a smug comedy club owner shot his wife and put her in a coma, but they can't come up with enough hard evidence to get him convicted.

Director:

Jace Alexander

Writers:

Dick Wolf (created by), Ed Zuckerman
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Jerry Orbach ... Lennie Briscoe
Chris Noth ... Mike Logan
S. Epatha Merkerson ... Anita Van Buren
Sam Waterston ... Jack McCoy
Jill Hennessy ... Claire Kincaid
Steven Hill ... Adam Schiff
Larry Miller ... Michael Dobson
Debra Monk ... Kathleen O'Brien
John Cunningham ... Max Weston
Heather Gottlieb Heather Gottlieb ... Susannah
Frank Girardeau Frank Girardeau ... Fred Harding
Erik Jensen ... Joey Springfield
Donald Corren ... Medill
Terry Layman Terry Layman ... Dr. George Fishman
David Pittu ... Walsh
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Storyline

When a woman is shot inside her car, Briscoe and Logan suspect her husband is the killer. A bullet still lodged in the victim's head will prove or disprove her husband's guilt and McCoy and Kincaid weigh the risk of obtaining this crucial evidence at the expense of possibly killing the victim. Written by .. the woman was not "shot to death"

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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 September 1994 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Chris Noth (Mike Logan) & Debra Monk (Kathleen O'Brien) also worked together on episode 7.13, The Good Wife: Judged (2016), of The Good Wife (2009), as Peter Florrick & Tracy Mintz respectively. See more »

Quotes

Jack McCoy: The police checked phone records, Dobson's bank account, the store where Robin cashed his welfare checks. They intereviewed Dobson's friends, Robin's friends, the people at the club. They couldn't find any other connection, meeting, conversation between Dobson and Robin. Nothing.
Adam Schiff: You think it's just a coincidence the killer appeared at a club owned by the victim's husband?
Jack McCoy: No. But even if I could retry him, I couldn't convict. He didn't leave a trail.
Adam Schiff: Smart.
Jack McCoy: Lucky.
Adam Schiff: Or innocent.
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Connections

References Leave It to Beaver (1957) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Larry Miller Makes This One
4 May 2018 | by Better_TVSee all my reviews

When a wife with a bullet in her brain goes into a vegetative coma, the prime suspect seems pretty obvious: her jerkoff comedy club-owning husband, played with an air of effortless a-holery by Larry Miller. Sometimes L&O side characters can be a bit sleepy and clichéd, so Miller's fast-talking performance as a blatantly selfish middle-class degenerate is pretty refreshing.

In a hilariously dark line, he even admits: "I don't need you to tell me I'm a son of a b***h ... But I happen to be a son of a b***h whose wife was shot by some other son of a b***."

This plot would be pretty generic without Miller's involvement, and without a classic L&O late-game twist: the DA's office desperately needs a ballistics report on the bullet embedded inside the victim. But the surgery could kill her. Is it ethical for them to sign off on surgery to get the bullet - and what if the bullet ends up not proving anything?

Debra Monk is great as the victim's grieving sister, who has always hated Miller's character. There's a certain amount of ambiguity to the way this one ends - it's intriguing rather than feeling like a cop out.

A great example of how to take a basic "husband vs. wife" plot and make it interesting.


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