Death Valley Days (1952–1970)
7.5/10
12
2 user

Brute Angel 

Sheriff McBain leaves home to arrest notorious gunslinger Sam Bolt for murder when he would prefer to see the arrival of his first grandchild. He encounters Pony, an associate of Bolt's, whose life he once saved and gains a needed ally.

Director:

Denver Pyle

Writer:

Scott Whitaker
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Robert J. Wilke ... Sheriff Tom McBain
Sherwood Price ... Sam Bolt
Jim Davis ... Pony Cragin
Jean Engstrom Jean Engstrom ... Esther McBain
Bill Zuckert ... Ed Billings
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
James Hurley James Hurley ... Doc
Ralph Moody ... Pop Handley
Dennis Olivieri Dennis Olivieri ... Jeff - Livery Boy
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Storyline

Sheriff McBain leaves home to arrest notorious gunslinger Sam Bolt for murder when he would prefer to see the arrival of his first grandchild. He encounters Pony, an associate of Bolt's, whose life he once saved and gains a needed ally.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

TV-PG
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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 October 1966 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Apache Junction, Arizona, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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User Reviews

Robert J. Wilke Remembered
10 January 2018 | by Charles ShannonSee all my reviews

Robert J. Wilke was a familiar presence in many western films and episodic western televison series. He most often played a very convincing villain in nearly all these roles, probably most famous as the belligerent cowhand in The Magnificent Seven, killed by a thrown knife in a stockyard duel with the character played by James Coburn.

In this Death Valley Days story, Wilke's character is an aging sheriff who accepts the responsibility of arresting a volatile gunman who may likely kill him when the confrontation arrives.

There is a very moving scene in the film when Wilke, alone in his hotel room late at night, reads from the bible and prays to a higher power for guidance in his difficult task.

His prayer is answered in an unforeseen but satisfying and remarkable way.


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