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In the Shadow of the Palms - Iraq (2005)

Not Rated | | Documentary, History, War | August 2006 (USA)
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The Internationally Multi-Award Winning Feaure In the Shadow of the Palms is the Only documentary filmed in Iraq prior to, during, and after the fall of Saddam Hussein. It documents the ... See full summary »

Director:

Wayne Coles-Janess
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6 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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The Internationally Multi-Award Winning Feaure In the Shadow of the Palms is the Only documentary filmed in Iraq prior to, during, and after the fall of Saddam Hussein. It documents the changes in Iraqi society, and the lives of ordinary Iraqis by focusing on a cross-section of individuals. The film presents audiences with a window into the everyday realities for those living through this controversial war. The film documents how life is for the society and people living under twelve years of sanctions and the regime of Saddam Hussein. When the inevitability of the US-led conflict increased and people across the globe protested the war, the filmmakers recorded the changes in the lives of the Iraqi people, focusing on a cross-section of individuals representative of the broader Iraqi community. The film follows these individuals as they prepare for the coalition war against their country and as it becomes the target for tens of thousands of coalition cruise missiles and guided bombs. ... Written by Ipso-Facto Productions

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Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

Australia

Language:

Arabic

Release Date:

August 2006 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Na Sombra das Palmeiras do Iraque See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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User Reviews

 
ISP: As Objective as you can get 11/08/06
10 August 2006 | by post-249See all my reviews

In an illegal war unsupported by the UN that has so far resulted in approximately 210,000 deaths including Iraqi servicemen, US military, foreign mercenaries (a.k.a .Contractors) and defenseless civilians (that we know of), it is hard to see how the US led "Democracy" is creating a better life for the people of Iraq.

Though viewer cnwb from Australia, mentions the "Nobility" of In the Shadow of the Palms in showing the drastic alteration of Iraqi civilians lifestyle as well as showing their humanity, he makes contradictory arguments as to the unstable objectivity of the film.

cnwb mentions how the film strays into political subjectivity such as "... the financial and logistical difficulties in making the film" due to the "economic infrastructure" of the Australian Film Industry, as well as the lack of emphasis on the arguments against Saddam Hussein – as propaganderised by Western interests.

A film such as this is 'one of a kind'. It is a representation to the questionable actions of the Western world in the name of democracy. By mentioning difficulties in making the film, Coles-Janess is showing how the Iraq story is still suffering by not only the bias of US media through political agendas & propaganda, but also through the lack of support by institutions that are financed by tax payers who deserve diversity. Why has Australian Film Festivals rejected this film?

Where is the conflict of interest if Coles-Janess contrast an Iraqi schoolgirl's negative opinions of the Bush administrations actions to those thoughts of a street cobbler who is glad now that his country is free of Hussein's dictatorship? The film is not narrated and is solely led by the statements of those who actually experienced the invasion of Iraq. The film even contrasts Iraqi views to those of US Soldiers- this seems to me extremely objective.

It is my opinion that In the Shadow of the Palms is not just a visual and human account the most significant event of our Century - it is a historical source that identifies and underlines the degree of separation between the Middle Eastern and Western worlds and their media. It has been invited to over 50 International film festivals, has been praised in reviews by The Age, Variety and the ABC who all write about a dramatically different film to that described by cnwb.


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