3.0/10
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65 user 50 critic

Night Of The Living Dead (2006)

Night of the Living Dead 3D (original title)
Trailer
1:10 | Trailer
Both an homage to and a re-imagining of the original 1968 film, this update follows a group of survivors trapped in a farmhouse battling a siege of undead zombies....in 3D!

Director:

Jeff Broadstreet

Writers:

Robert Valding (screenplay), George A. Romero | 1 more credit »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Brianna Brown ... Barb
Joshua DesRoches ... Ben
Sid Haig ... Gerald Tovar, Jr.
Greg Travis ... Henry Cooper
Johanna Black ... Hellie Cooper
Adam Chambers ... Owen
Ken Ward ... Johnny / Johnny Zombie
Alynia Phillips Alynia Phillips ... Karen Cooper
Max E. Williams ... Tom (as Max Williams)
Cristin Michele ... Judy
Marcia Ann Burrs ... Mom Zombie
Robert DiTillio ... Priest / Priest Zombie
Brian La Rosa Brian La Rosa ... Gerald Tovar, Sr. Zombie / Second Road Attack Zombie / First Kitchen Attack Zombie / Crone Zombie / Window Zombie / Judy-killer Zombie
Alan Gorg Alan Gorg ... Mourner Zombie
Jason Brandt ... Grounds Keeper Zombie
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Storyline

Barb and her brother Johnny travel to the country for the funeral services of their aunt, but they arrive late and drive direct to the cemetery. They see the location empty, but sooner they are attacked by zombies. Johnny escapes in his car leaving Barb alone, but she is rescued by the drug dealer and college student Ben. He drives his motorcycle to the Cooper farm, and the patriarch Henry Cooper does not give credit to Barb. When the farmhouse is under siege of a group of flesh-eaters zombies, the local mortician Gerald Tovar Jr. arrives and tells a scary story about the origin of the zombies. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Dead Will Never Look So Alive See more »

Genres:

Horror

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for horror violence and gore, language, sexual content, nudity and drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Jeff Broadstreet wrote the Gerald Tovar, Jr. part specifically for Sid Haig. He didn't let him in on this fact until after filming wrapped. See more »

Goofs

When Sid Haig's character enters Henry's house, Henry appears to be fine, despite just being bitten by his daughter. In the very next shot he has bandages over his neck which were not in the shot before. See more »

Quotes

Henry Cooper: This is not happening. These are not fucking walking corpses.
Ben: Hey man, this is fucking happening.
Barb: Call the freaking cops.
Hellie Cooper: We have to baby.
Henry Cooper: Yeah, call the cops. When the dead walk, you gotta call the cops.
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Crazy Credits

"THE PERSONS AND EVENTS IN THIS MOTION PICTURE ARE FICTITIOUS. ANY SIMILARITY TO ACTUAL EVENTS OR PERSONS, LIVING, DEAD OR UNDEAD, IS UNINTENTIONAL." See more »

Connections

References Scarface (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Breathe
By Annette Marie & Kacy Ross
Performed by Shut Up Marie
Annette Marie Music (ASCAP)
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User Reviews

 
Poor cash-in on a true classic
7 November 2011 | by Leofwine_dracaSee all my reviews

This pointless rehash of the Romero classic sees the original story retold as a modern-day Z-grade effort, replete with amateur night acting and Halloween masks. Yes, it really is that bad, and the biggest surprise is that cash-in king John Russo – a guy who's made an entire career from the fact that he wrote and produced the 1968 film - is nowhere to be seen.

The story diverges little from the original, except to introduce an extra, extraneous character – played by B-movie stalwart Sid Haig. The zombies are so ineffectual here and the gore so tame that two things happen: first, an extra villain is introduced to little end, and secondly, their origin has to be explained in depth. Both take away from the eerie impact of the Romero original, where the horror came from the fact that the world ended abruptly with the 'what if?' scenario of zombies arriving at your door.

The film's hook is the 3D, but anyone going in looking for guts and entrails flying out of the screen (a la the MY BLOODY VALENTINE remake and the latter FINAL DESTINATION movies) will be disappointed. A 3D spliff and subsequent smoke ring are all you're going to get (way to take advantage of the technology, huh?). Speaking of spliffs, the awful dialogue is loaded with stoner jokes and a far cry from the terse exchanges we all remember from Romero's classic.

The acting is terrible, aside from Haig, an actor who always seems to be enjoying himself (complete with ghoulish chuckle) in his recent B-movie outings. The story is so slim that at one stage we take a softcore detour to the barn, where a sex scene between two unappealing characters plays out in all its nude detail. Incredibly, the end result is a film that feels more dated and less grisly than the film that inspired it, made all those years ago; making me appreciate Romero all the more is the only thing this movie does right.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 November 2006 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Undead in 3D See more »

Filming Locations:

Fillmore, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$750,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$215,300, 12 November 2006

Gross USA:

$271,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,657,729
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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