5.7/10
9,632
66 user 60 critic

Chapter 27 (2007)

Trailer
2:06 | Trailer

Watch Now

With Prime Video

ON DISC
ALL
A film about Mark David Chapman in the days leading up to the infamous murder of Beatle John Lennon.

Director:

J.P. Schaefer

Writers:

J.P. Schaefer, Jack Jones (inspired by the book "Let Me Take You Down")
2 wins. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Chuck Cooper ... Cabbie
Victor Verhaeghe ... Cop #1
Robert Gerard Larkin Robert Gerard Larkin ... Cop #2
Lindsay Lohan ... Jude
Ursula Abbott ... Jeri
Roy Milton Davis ... Homeless Man
Brian Bell Brian Bell ... Cabbie#2
Dan Schultz Dan Schultz ... Steve
Adam Scarimbolo ... Clerk Riley
Molly Griffith ... Centerfold Model
Spiro Malas Spiro Malas ... Elevator Man
Jeane Fournier ... Prostitute
Kate Higgins ... Gloria
Matthew Nardozzi ... Little Kid
Brian O'Neill ... Patrick
Edit

Storyline

A film about Mark David Chapman in the days leading up to the infamous murder of Beatle John Lennon.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He came to New York to meet John Lennon...and the world changed forever See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

Canada | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 December 2007 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

Capitolul 27 See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

CAD 5,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$13,910, 30 March 2008, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$55,704, 4 May 2008
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

|

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

M. D. Chapman's hotel room in N-Y was on the 27th floor. See more »

Goofs

On a shelf in the bookstore is a copy of White ninja. Published in 1990. The movie takes place in 1980. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Mark David Chapman: I believe in Holden Caulfield. And in the book, and what he was saying, what he was saying to a lost generation of phony people.
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the credits, all of the people are credited for their characters, however the final listings are as follows: John Lennon..................Mark Lindsay Chapman and Jared Leto See more »


Soundtracks

Piece of Cake
Written by Loren Wilfong
Published by Carbert Special Accounts (BMI)
Courtesy of APM Music
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
Reach Exceeds Grasp
6 April 2007 | by gabridlSee all my reviews

I wanted to watch this movie because, in a weird coincidence, I happened to walk by the Dakota the night John Lennon was shot. At the time I was a senior in high school visiting New York for a few days, feeling a lot like my imagination of Holden Caufield. "John Lennon got shot," the police said. I went to Central Park for the public memorial. Some people were sad, but many others were excited, as if they were taking part in a giant happening. The atmosphere was hardly funereal, something you can see in the stock footage of the scene. I was disgusted and left. "Phonies," I thought.

The movie gets a lot of things right. The preppy clothes, the look of New York, the bad food, the awkward dialog—all this brought back memories of feeling young and alienated. It also succeeds in its allusions to "The Catcher in the Rye" and even "Lolita," where Chapman could just as easily have been Humbert Humbert at the end. The acting is quite good, and the direction, though flawed, succeeds more often than not.

Most interesting to me was the concept. Many reviewers feel disappointed that we don't understand the mind of the killer by the end. But that's the point. There's nothing to understand. The relation between fans and artists is much like the relation between youth and age, or poor and rich, or even mobs and leaders. In the first instance, there is sensitivity that this powerless and derivative, and in the second, there is sensitivity that is assured and original. The former condition, as Salinger, Nabokov, and my own memory of adolescence contend, is basically Hell. The main character never escapes this condition: consider his book inscription. From this perspective the movie is less an exploration of his motivation, which is causal and developmental, than a description of his emotional state, which is static and permanent. This is suggested by the structure of the narrative, which follows the circularity of Salinger's novel.

Viewers will have to decide for themselves whether the movie pulls off the larger metaphor, namely, that America itself has never escaped the nightmare of adolescence. If you want to see the disintegration of a lonely loser, "The Assassignation of Richard Nixon" is a better movie. But "Chapter 27" is smarter than it appears.


71 of 110 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 66 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed