7.0/10
1,771
23 user 77 critic

Arctic Tale (2007)

Trailer
0:49 | Trailer
Two narratives -- the life cycle of a mother walrus and her calf, and the life of a polar bear and her cubs -- are used to illustrate the harsh realities of existence in the Arctic.

Writers:

Linda Woolverton (narration), Mose Richards (narration) | 1 more credit »
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Credited cast:
Queen Latifah ... Narrator (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Katrina Agate ... Kid in End Credits
Zain Ali Zain Ali ... Kid in End Credits
Preston Bailey ... Kid in End Credits
Kwesi Boakye ... Kid in End Credits
Michael Huang Michael Huang ... Kid in End Credits
Sierra Marcoux ... Kid in End Credits
Dante Pastula Dante Pastula ... Kid in End Credits
Peyton Pearson Peyton Pearson ... Kid in End Credits
Isabella Peschardt ... Kid in End Credits
Christina Robinson ... Kid in End Credits
Lili Sepe ... Kid in End Credits
Ke'ala Valencia Ke'ala Valencia ... Kid in End Credits
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Storyline

Two narratives -- the life cycle of a mother walrus and her calf, and the life of a polar bear and her cubs -- are used to illustrate the harsh realities of existence in the Arctic.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

From the people who brought you March of the Penguins See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Connections

Spin-off Arctic Tale (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Black Wave
Written by James Mercer
Performed by The Shins
See more »

User Reviews

 
Doesn't Come Close To March Of The Penguins
11 August 2008 | by fwompSee all my reviews

Global Warming is a real threat. The majority of scientists across the globe agree on this (there is a small dissenting group but nothing compared to those that believe in the theory). And wildlife filmmakers Adam Ravetch and Sarah Robertson believed there were ways to prove it. So they embarked on a fifteen year odyssey to film the lives of two creatures: Nanu the polar bear and Seela the Walrus.

The arctic is where these two live, and the arctic is the battleground most climatologists point to whenever they are asked for proof of global warming theory. It is important to let our children know that this area is in danger—as are its animals—thanks to the changes in global climate. And children are who this G-rated film is directed at.

There's the cuddly polar bear scene when Nanu is born with her "brother", and the protective nature of walruses as they fret over their young. And there's the bathroom humor of the walruses as they eat clams and then expel flatulence in roaring surround sound.

But there's also some things that might frighten the very young. Nanu and her ilk are meat eaters; in fact, they love walrus and seal meat. Some bloody carcasses are seen on several occasions, so parents who haven't discussed life-cycles with their young ones should beware. The fact that the movie-makers didn't give Nanu's "brother" and Seela's "auntie" a name should also give you pause (crewman 19!).

To help aid in the marketing of this film, you'll often hear "From the people that brought you MARCH OF THE PENGUINS..." but don't be fooled. Neither director nor the writers involved here were affiliated with March of the Penguins. Both films were aided with production dollars by National Geographic Films but that's about it.

Although March of the Penguins held more astonishing film footage, this film can boast some exquisite shots of its own. Following polar bears around as they swim in the open ocean and watching walruses suckle their newborns was something I found phenomenally well filmed. The vanishing ice flows are also pointedly shown as months into what should have been the arctic winter turns into open seas instead of frozen waters.

Queen Latifah (HAIRSPRAY) does a great job narrating. Never over-the-top, her tone was perfect for the settings. Always.

But I think Morgan Freeman did a bit better job during March of the Penguins. All-in-all, it's a superior documentary that stands head and shoulders above this one. But that shouldn't shame Arctic Tale at all. It's a decent documentary.

Just decent.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 August 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Call of the North See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,607, 29 July 2007

Gross USA:

$833,532

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,864,636
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

SDDS | Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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