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Jesus Camp (2006)

Trailer
2:02 | Trailer
A documentary on kids who attend a summer camp hoping to become the next Billy Graham.
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 6 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Lou Engle Lou Engle ... Self
Becky Fischer ... Self
Ted Haggard ... Self
Mike Papantonio ... Self - Commentator
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Storyline

Jesus Camp follows several young children as they prepare to attend a summer camp where the kids will get their daily dose of evangelical Christianity. Becky Fischer works at the camp, which is named Kids on Fire. Through interviews with Fischer, the children, and others, Jesus Camp illustrates the unswerving belief of the faithful. A housewife and homeschooling mother tells her son that creationism has all the answers. Footage from inside the camp shows young children weeping and wailing as they promise to stop their sinning. Child after child is driven to tears. Juxtapose these scenes with clips from a more moderate Christian radio host (who is appalled by such tactics), and Jesus Camp seems to pose a clear question: are these children being brainwashed? Written by Ken Miller <wkmiller704@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

America is being born again

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some discussions of mature subject matter | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Since the making of the film, Becky Fischer, children's pastor for Kids on Fire, announced that due to negative reactions to the camp after the film, including telephone calls and vandalism, the camp, which was held once a year for three weeks, has been discontinued indefinitely and will be replaced by other events. See more »

Goofs

Becky Fisher swings a stuffed Lion and says "You've got a Tiger by the tail". See more »

Quotes

Tory Binger: When I dance, I really have to make sure that that's God, because people will notice when I'm dancing for the flesh.
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Connections

References Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Breathe Prophesy
Music and lyrics by Todd Ganovski
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User Reviews

 
The Culture War goes to summer camp.
16 June 2006 | by alafolleSee all my reviews

I saw this film at the Silverdocs festival, expecting it to be little more than an oddball slice of Americana, but I was pleasantly surprised.

"Jesus Camp" revolves around a pentecostal minister who hosts a summer camp for children in North Dakota, and the sectarian Christian conservative families who send their children to this camp. Directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady wisely chose to avoid the polemical tone of most politically-motivated films, and instead opt to present a mostly unfiltered glimpse of this odd subculture. But through carefully selected images and the use of talk radio commentary as a framing device, they construct a subtle, yet damning narrative about a religious movement that isolates its children from mainstream culture, indoctrinates them into right-wing causes, and uses them as political props.

At Jesus Camp, the daily activities include standard camp fare such as spelunking and go-karts, but they also include speaking in tongues and smashing coffee mugs emblazoned with the word "government". Children learn that "science doesn't prove anything," and learn to consider themselves part of an Army of God. They are compelled to pledge that they will fight to end abortion. They are even pushed into publicly confessing their impure thoughts, and many of them cry and wail charismatically.

The camp director explains that she admires the way Islamic cultures raise children so devoted they will risk their lives for their faith. When we ultimately see several of the campers being placed by their parents on the steps of the Capitol with tape over their mouths, protesting abortion, the real purpose of this camp is driven home.

But the most touching scenes are the ones where the children are alone, and we see the ways that this indoctrination creeps into the most innocent elements of childhood. 11 year old Tori loves dancing to Christian rock, but frets that it's not always easy to dance for God instead of "dancing for the flesh." On an outing to the bowling alley, 9 year old Rachael feels compelled to walk up to strangers and awkwardly evangelize to them, without being prompted. A roomful of boys telling ghost stories after dark are interrupted by an adult who warns them about stories that don't glorify God.

No doubt some viewers will accuse the filmmakers of the dreaded liberal bias. But this is not a work of fiction, nor is it slanted reporting. These are real people and real events, captured on film. If the evangelical movement comes off badly in this film, the people on screen have no one but themselves to blame.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 December 2006 (Canada) See more »

Also Known As:

Jesus Camp See more »

Filming Locations:

Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$17,659, 17 September 2006

Gross USA:

$902,544

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,013,596
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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