Direktøren for det hele (2006) - News Poster

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LevelK acquires Danish family action feature 'Hacker' (exclusive)

LevelK acquires Danish family action feature 'Hacker' (exclusive)
Poul Berg’s feature debut was developed in cooperation with fellow Emmy nominee Kalle Bjerkø.

LevelK has acquired world sales rights for Poul Berg’s Danish family action film Hacker.

The film marks the feature debut for Emmy nominee Berg, whose TV credits include Ride Upon The Storm, Mille and Limbo.

The script has been developed in cooperation with writer Kalle Bjerkø, Emmy nominee 2012 for Boxhead.

Signe Leick Jensen and Morten Kaufmann produce for Toolbox Film, with Cinenic Film as co-producer. Backers include The Danish Film Institute, Dr TV, The Swedish Film Institute, Svt, Scanbox Entertainment, LevelK and Creative Europe/Media.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New to Streaming: ‘A Ghost Story,’ The Films of Lars von Trier, ‘Blame,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Blame (Quinn Shephard)

Written, directed, edited, and starring 22-year-old Quinn Shephard, Blame premiered at Tribeca Film Festival last spring. We said in our review, “It’s an impressive debut feature that’s confident and assured, yet feels less like a feature film and more like an effective television drama with a few well-drawn characters and a multi-episode arc. Its asymmetric narrative doesn’t always work as it withholds information
See full article at The Film Stage »

Producer Richard B. Lewis Sets Three Projects At Universal Cable Productions

Veteran producer Richard B. Lewis (August Rush, Backdraft, The Outer Limits) and his Southpaw Entertainment Group have three new projects in development at Universal Cable Productions, Deadline has learned. The first is a project about monsters and their creators, the second an adaptation of Nicola Moriarty's breakthrough novel, The Fifth Letter, and the third, a half-hour comedic adaptation of Lars Von Trier’s, The Boss Of It All. Lewis and Salem co-creator Adam Simon…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Movie Review - Nymphomaniac: Volume I and Volume II (2013).

Nymphomaniac: Volume I and Nymphomaniac: Volume II, 2013

Written and Directed by Lars von Trier.

Starring Charlotte Gainsbourg, Stellan Skarsgard, Stacy Martin, Shia Labeouf, Christian Slater, Jamie Bell, Willem Dafoe, Mia Goth, Sophie Kennedy Clark, Michael Pas, Jean-Marc Barr and Connie Nielsen.

Synopsis:

A self-diagnosed nymphomaniac recounts her erotic experiences to the man who saved her after a beating.

“Leave your hair up. It might be necessary if I decide to punch you in the face.” – K (Jaime Bell) to Joe (Charlotte Gainsborgh) in Nymphomaniac: Volume II

Controversy, rightly or wrongly, is attached to a Lars von Trier picture like hype is attached to the news of a comic book adaptation, often blown out of proportion because of the need for something to write about. With the marketing for his latest work, the two parts of Nymphomaniac, teasing us with posters of the cast making an ‘o-face’ and a cheeky
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Mitch Hurwitz to Remake Lars von Trier’s The Boss of it All

What’s wrong with Mitch Hurwitz? For the last few years, we had a chance to hear that he’ll be writing the script for Arrested Development, and that filming will begin soon, and… well, a lot of things!

And now, we’re here to report that Hurwitz has actually just set up a deal with Universal to direct a remake of Lars von Trier‘s The Boss of It All comedy?

No, we’re not kidding! According to the latest reports, Emma Forrest will be in charge for the screenplay, while Arrested Development narrator Ron Howard will executive-produce with Brian Grazer through their Imagine Entertainment company.

And here’s a little description of the original The Boss of It All (Direktøren for det hele) movie:

“The owner of an It company wishes to sell it. But, for years, he has pretended that the real boss lives in America and
See full article at Filmofilia »

The Danish films are coming

The Danish films are coming
The Danish Film Festival will return to Los Angeles Oct. 4-11 with an opening-night screening of Carl Theodor Dreyer's 1928 film La passion de Jeanne d'Arc, featuring a new score.

This year's festival will commemorate 100 years of Danish cinema and feature screenings at the Laemmle Sunset 5 of films including Hunger, Pelle the Conqueror and Babette's Feast, as well as recent works like Lars von Trier's The Boss of It All.

The Boss of It All

The Boss of It All
Always full of surprises, Lars von Trier moves far from the didactic, this-is-good-for-you medicine of Manderlay and Dogville to a seemingly light comedy, The Boss of It All. Naturally, things are not that simple when dealing with one of Dogma's founding members. In this film, he is, among other things, experimenting with a new (and dubious) camera system; taking shots at pretentious actors (after having worked with and clashed with stars like Nicole Kidman); passing sly moral judgments on globalization; and even having fun with Icelanders.

The film does mark a return to his roots, of sorts. It is in Danish with mostly Danish actors, and eschews allegory for what is remarkably close to screwball comedy. It is a refreshing change, whatever you call it, and marks his most accessible work in years. It has arrived in such an off-hand manner in the U.S. that it may escape the notice of all but the most ardent art house lovers. Too bad. It is certainly a whole lot more enjoyable than Manderlay, which felt like a trip to the dentist.

Von Trier begins with his camera tracking up the side of a soulless office building. His reflection alongside the camera is seen in the windows. Yes, a strange start to a movie, he says, but no worries: This is a comedy and harmless as such. No preaching or swaying of opinion. "This film won't cause you more than a moment's reflection," he concludes.

This fish-out-of-water comedy begins with the fact that Ravn (Peter Gantzler), a longtime director and secret owner of an IT company, is a wuss, so much so that he has created a nonexistent and perpetually absent "boss of it all" to make the unpopular decisions he is afraid to announce to his staff himself. But when he wants to sell the company to a disgruntled Icelander (director Fridrik Thor Fridriksson) -- who despises Danes in the first place -- Ravn suddenly needs that boss to exist, if only to give him the power of attorney to sign papers.

He hires an out-of-work actor, Kristoffer (Jens Albinus). But Kristoffer's line readings are so overdone at the key meeting, the Icelander storms out and demands Kristoffer come to the next meeting, power of attorney be damned. When Kristoffer introduces himself to employees, Ravn has no choice but to let the actor continue in the role for a week.

The problem is the boss of it all is different things to different people, according to the misinformation supplied by Ravn. To one woman he is gay. To another he has proposed marriage. One man, upon meeting him, slugs him. Another woman screams every time the copying machine springs to life.

In a series of skit-like scenes, Kristoffer must sort out the "back story" of his character. As he does so, he comes to like the senior employees and to feel that Ravn may be cheating them.

The comic complications grow quite wonderfully silly, and are aided by the deadpan deliveries of most of the actors. Even better, most of the film takes place in an arid office building bathed in a Nordic gray-green light, which couldn't look more awful.

Of course, the awful look may have something to do with von Trier's new whiz-bang camera system. This film, you understand, was not shot by a cinematographer. No, it was shot by Automavision, which hands control of the camera to a computer program.

This is, media notes explain, "a principle for shooting film developed with the intention of limiting human influence by inviting chance in from the cold." Which explains the odd framings, though not the internal jump cuts within scenes making everything seem unsettled and nervous.

Let's just say the movie is a success but the experiment a failure.

THE BOSS OF IT ALL

IFC First Take

A Zentrope Entertainment 21/Memfis Film International/Slot Machine/Lucky Red production

Credits:

Screenwriter-director: Lars von Trier

Producers: Meta Louise Foldager, Vibeke Windelov, Signe Jensen

Executive producers: Lene Borglum, Peter Albaek

Director of photography: Automavision

Production designer: Simone Grau

Costume designer: Manon Rasmussen

Editor: Molly M. Stensgaard

Cast:

Kristoffer: Jens Albinus

Ravn: Peter Gantzler

Lise: Iben Hjejle

Nalle: Henrik Prip

Heidi A.: Mia Lyhne

Gorm: Casper Christensen

Mette: Louise Mieritz

Spencer: Jean-Marc Barr

Kisser: Sofie Grabol

Finnur: Fridrick Thor Fredriksson

Running time -- 98 minutes

No MPAA rating

'Little Children' to open Mexico fest

'Little Children' to open Mexico fest
MEXICO CITY -- Todd Field's Oscar-nominated Little Children will open the 4th annual Mexico City International Contemporary Film Festival, one of Mexico's top movie showcases.

A total of 219 films from 47 nations will unspool during the 10-day festival, which runs from Feb. 21-March 4 here in the nation's capital.

The FICCO, as the event is called, will have 16 features and 17 documentaries in competition, organizers said at a Thursday news conference.

The fiction section features two Mexican productions: Ruben Imaz's Familia Tortuga (Turtle Family) and the world premiere of Ivan Avila's La Sangre Iluminada (Enlightened Blood).

The only American feature in competition is Julia Loktev's Day Night Day Night. The majority of fictional titles in competition are first works, including the award-winning 12:08 East of Bucharest, the first feature-length offering from Romania's Corneliu Porumboiu.

Notable foreign pictures screening out of competition include the Spike Lee documentary When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts, David Lynch's Inland Empire, Lars Von Trier's The Boss of It All and Canada's foreign-language Oscar-nominee, Water.

Among the international jury members are Jim Jarmusch, producer Jim Stark, actress Geraldine Chaplin and producer Mary Sweeney.

The Boss of It All

The Boss of It All
Palm Springs International Film Festival

PALM SPRINGS -- Taking a break between the second and third installments of his "USA: Land of Opportunities" trilogy, Lars von Trier goes for the jocular in "The Boss of It All", a slight and sprightly bit of fun that's not, however, without teeth. The Danish writer-director concocts a sort of Scandi "Office", gathering an able and willing ensemble for what he drolly describes in introductory voice-over as "a comedy, and harmless as such." It's also a delight. The film screened recently at the Palm Springs festival and is scheduled for limited stateside release in May, when it's sure to attract the von Trier faithful.

Avoiding the overt social commentary of the director's most recent work, "Boss" is perhaps closest in focus to "The Five Obstructions", his 2003 docu on the filmmaking process, in which von Trier played a devilishly entertaining game of one-upmanship with director Jorgen Leth. Here he casts a prankster's eye on actorly affectations, the director-actor relationship and the conventions of throwaway entertainment, all while lampooning the collective delusions of corporate culture.

The wonderful Jens Albinu (who starred in von Trier's 1998 comic drama "The Idiots") plays Kristoffer, an actor hired by businessman Ravn (Peter Gantzler) to play the owner of an IT company -- not onstage, but in the boardroom. During negotiations with Icelandic entrepreneur Finnur (Fridrik Thor Fridriksson), who wants to buy the firm, Kristoffer injects meaningful pauses into his "line readings" that all but stop the dealmaking cold. The perpetually unamused Finnur is convinced that all Danes are wacko. He doesn't know the half of it.

Wanting only to be loved, Ravn, a handsome and affable bear of a man, has for 10 years hidden his true status as the company's owner, pretending to be just another manager and inventing via e-mail a distant uberboss named Svend. Earnest thespian Kristoffer steps into the role with almost no "direction" from Ravn, variously dodging and playing along with the projected dreams and hostilities of the staff. Gorm (Casper Christensen) is given to violent outbursts, Mette (Louise Mieritz) is terrified whenever the copier whirs into action, assistant Heidi (Mia Lyhne) harbors deep feelings for Svend, while HR rep Lise (Iben Hjejle) not only encourages office sex but insists on it. Actor and Dogme filmmaking disciple Jean-Marc Barr plays a foreign employee who insists on speaking bungled and indecipherable Danish.

Determined to stay true to his "character," Kristoffer continually invokes one Antonio Stavro Gambini, the playwright he reveres above all others. Ravn, for reasons that become increasingly clear, prefers to keep things on the buzzword level, as vague as possible. Kristoffer hits his stride with some table-turning improv involving contracts.

The understated comic performances serve the material well, while Automavision, the credited cinematographer, keeps things aptly off-center with random computer-automated camera angles -- one of which von Trier calls to our attention as a "pointless zoom."

THE BOSS OF IT ALL

IFC Films/IFC First Take

A Zentropa Entertainments 21/Memfis Film Intl./Slot Machine/Lucky Red production

Credits:

Screenwriter-director: Lars von Trier

Producers: Meta Louise Foldager, Vibeke Windelov, Signe Jensen

Executive producers: Lene Borglum, Peter Albaek Jensen

Director of photography: Automavision

Costume designer: Manon Rasmussen

Editor: Molly Malene Stensgaard

Cast:

Kristoffer: Jens Albinus

Ravn: Peter Gantzler

Finnur: Fridrik Thor Fridriksson

Lise: Iben Hjejle

Mette: Louise Mieritz

Heidi A.: Mia Lyhne

Gorm: Casper Christensen

Spencer: Jean-Marc Barr

Interpreter: Benedikt Erlingsson.

Running time -- 100 minutes

No MPAA rating

Nouveau fest premiering Von Trier's latest

Nouveau fest premiering Von Trier's latest
TORONTO -- Montreal's Festival du Nouveau Cinema on Tuesday said it will host the international premiere of Lars von Trier's The Boss of It All during its 35th edition in October. The Danish-language comedy about the owner of a technology company who hides behind a fictitious president to escape difficult managerial decisions features an ensemble cast that includes Jens Albinus, Casper Christensen, Peter Gantzler and Jean-Marc Barr. The Festival du Nouveau Cinema, the rival to the Montreal World Film Festival, is set to run Oct. 18-28.

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