World Trade Center (2006) - News Poster

News

Cage's Onscreen Brother Arrested

Cage's Onscreen Brother Arrested
The actor who played Nicolas Cage's brother in World Trade Center has been arrested on assault charges.

Wass Stevens, 45, who starred alongside Cage in the 2006 film, also works as a doorman in New York and on Wednesday was detained by police and charged with attacking a man outside Manhattan hotspot Avenue.

Stevens - real name Mark Wasserman - has been charged with assault and possession of a weapon after he allegedly beat a 24 year old student with the metal end of velvet rope after refusing him entry.

Peter Pak was taken to the city's St. Vincent's Hospital in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

He tells New York Post gossip column PageSix, "He was very condescending. We started cursing at each other and arguing. He lifted the rope and tossed the end metal part at my face. My head cracked and I fell to the ground. I had to go to the hospital for a Cat scan. There was no internal damage but I had huge blaring headaches."

But Stevens' lawyer, Sal Strazzullo, says: "Wass is 100 per cent innocent. He was released on his own recognisance, without bail, which I think shows you the weakness of the case. There wasn't even a corroborating statement from the victim at the court hearing."

Stevens has appeared alongside Mickey Rourke in The Wrestler and in Richard Gere's upcoming movie Brooklyn's Finest. He has also had recurring roles in TV's Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Ugly Betty.

Elizabeth Banks cast as Laura Bush

Elizabeth Banks cast as Laura Bush
RELATED:

Stone casts vote for 'Bush'

Trio of stars make 'Porno' with Smith

Elizabeth Banks is going from the world of adult films to the White House.

The actress, who recently wrapped shooting Kevin Smith's "Zack and Miri Make a Porno", is in final negotiations to portray Laura Bush in "W," Oliver Stone's biopic on the life and presidency of George W. Bush.

Josh Brolin already is on board to play Bush in the biopic, which begins shooting in late April in Shreveport, La.

Stone wrote the screenplay with his "Wall Street" co-writer Stanley Weiser.

Moritz Borman, who worked with Stone on "World Trade Center" and "Alexander", is producing, as is Jon Kilik.

Beverly Hills-based QED International is financing and handling sales.

Banks, repped by UTA and Untitled, next appears opposite Eddie Murphy in the comedy "Meet Dave" and then opposite Aaron Eckhart in "Meet Bill".

Par visualizes senior vp stripes for LoCascio

Par visualizes senior vp stripes for LoCascio
Paramount has promoted Kimberly LoCascio to senior vp production, visual effects.

LoCascio will continue to oversee all aspects of visual effects development and production for films released by the studio as well as those released by MTV Films and Nickelodeon Movies. She also will oversee feature animation and specialty projects, including 3-D.

"Now that VFX has become a key part of almost every film, I feel very fortunate to have Kimberly's depth of experience and proven track record of delivering groundbreaking effects here at Paramount," said Mark Bakshi, the studio's president of feature production management, who made Tuesday's announcement.

She is overseeing the visual effects on The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Star Trek, G.I. Joe, Nowhereland and Love Guru and also worked on The Spiderwick Chronicles, Cloverfield and World Trade Center.

Before Paramount, The Spiderwick Chronicles was a freelance visual effects producer on such films as Demolition Man, Waterworld and The Chronicles of Riddick. She began her careen in visual effects at Industrial Light + Magic.

Stone casts vote for 'Bush'

Oliver Stone, who has made films about the assassination of John F. Kennedy and the presidency of Richard Nixon, will next turn his attention to George W. Bush.

Josh Brolin is attached to play the president in the project, titled Bush.

Stone is looking to secure financing for a script by Stanley Weiser, who co-wrote Wall Street with Stone and who also penned the 2003 telefilm Rudy: The Rudy Giulianai Story.

Stone hopes to begin production on Bush as early as the spring in order to release the film by the fall election. But securing financing in the midst of an election cycle in which even the Republican candidates for the presidency are distancing themselves from Bush could present a challenge if the film is to be completed before Bush fades from the scene.

Moritz Borman, who served as a producer on both Stone's Alexander and World Trade Center, and John Kilik, another of Alexander's producers, are on board to produce.

Kilik also was to have produced Stone's My Lai massacre film Pinkville, which United Artists put on hold in November, citing the need for further script revisions, though skeptics also suggested that the company lost confidence in the politically themed project after the boxoffice failure of Lions for Lambs.

Cast in Stone: Harrelson to 'Pinkville'

Cast in Stone: Harrelson to 'Pinkville'
Woody Harrelson is reteaming with Oliver Stone in the director's Vietnam War drama Pinkville for United Artists.

Harrelson joins Bruce Willis and Channing Tatum, who already have been cast in the mystery drama based on the infamous 1968 My Lai Massacre, in which upward of 500 people -- mostly women, children and the elderly -- were killed by U.S. soldiers. The massacre ended up being a turning point in the war.

Harrelson will play Col. Henderson, the conflicted officer in charge of the task force that committed the massacre.

Mikko Alanne wrote the script. Production is set to begin next year, with MGM distributing.

Willis will portray William R. Peers, the real-life Army general who investigated the incident. Tatum will play Hugh Thompson Jr., an Army helicopter pilot who aided the villagers and later testified against the soldiers.

Michael Pena, who appeared in Stone's World Trade Center and plays an Army Ranger in Afghanistan in Robert Redford's Lions for Lambs, also has been cast.

Stone headed to 'Pinkville' along with UA

Oliver Stone is in final negotiations with United Artists to direct Pinkville, a Vietnam War drama based on a true story set to star Bruce Willis and Channing Tatum. Michael Pena is in talks to play the third lead role.

Willis will play William R. Peers, the real-life Army general who investigated the infamous 1968 My Lai Massacre of Vietnamese civilians. About 350-500 people -- mostly women, children and the elderly -- were killed by U.S. soldiers.

Tatum will portray Hugh Thompson Jr., an Army helicopter pilot who helped stop the killing by flying between the attackers and the My Lai villagers, rescued survivors and later testified against the soldiers.

Pena is in talks to play Capt. Ernest Medina, the tough commanding officer of the troops responsible for the massacre who was charged in the crimes but ultimately found not guilty. Pena appeared in Stone's last film, World Trade Center, and is in Robert Redford's upcoming UA drama Lions for Lambs.

UA is in talks to finance the $40 million project, set for production next year and distribution through MGM.

Stone Directs Anti-War Ad

  • WENN
Stone Directs Anti-War Ad
Oscar-winning movie director Oliver Stone will make a political television commercial demanding the withdrawal of US troops from Iraq. The World Trade Center filmmaker - who served as a private in the Vietnam War - will film American service personnel for the forthcoming advertisement, supported by the MoveOn and VoteVets organizations. Stone says, "America needs to listen to our servicemen and women. We have leaders in Washington who say they're 'supporting our troops' - but the people who suffer most from their policies are the troops themselves," said Stone in a statement.

Sound picks: Golden Reel noms set

Sound picks: Golden Reel noms set
Clint Eastwood will be honored as Filmmaker of the Year at the 54th annual MPSE Golden Reel Awards, set for Feb. 24 at the Beverly Hilton.

The Motion Picture Sound Editors also will recognize Richard L. Anderson, who has worked as a sound editor on such films as Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Color Purple, Madagascar and Flushed Away, with the Career Achievement Award.

The MPSE also announced nominees for the Golden Reel Awards, which acknowledge the year's best work in dialogue & ADR, effects & foley, and music.

For domestic feature, dialogue & ADR, the nominees are "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," Flags of Our Fathers, World Trade Center, The Last King of Scotland, Letters From Iwo Jima, Apocalypto, Little Miss Sunshine and The Da Vinci Code.

For domestic feature, effects & foley, they are Dead Man's Chest, Flags, Blood Diamond, Iwo Jima, WTC, Superman Returns, Mission: Impossible 3 and The Prestige.

In feature animation, effects & foley, the nominees are Cars, Happy Feet, Over the Hedge, Flushed Away, The Ant Bully and Ice Age: The Meltdown.

For feature film music, the nominees are Apocalypto, Dead Man's Chest, Babel, Children of Men, Click, Lucky Number Slevin, The Proposition and Bobby.

For musical feature, the nominees are Dreamgirls, "Tenacious D: The Pick of Destiny," Copying Beethoven, Take the Lead and A Prairie Home Companion.

The foreign features nominees are Casino Royale, Pan's Labyrinth, Babel, Children of Men, United 93, Curse of the Golden Flower, Slevin and The Black Dahlia.

The Golden Reels also include categories for TV, direct-to-video, special venues and computer entertainment.

Par president Berman leaves studio post

Par president Berman leaves studio post
Paramount Pictures has officially confirmed that president Gail Berman  is leaving her post.

Brad Grey, Paramount chairman and CEO, announced Wednesday afternoon that Berman has exited her job, effective immediately. A reorganization of the studio's production structure will be announced shortly, the studio said.

Berman, who joined the studio in May, 2005, had a hand in a number of films, including "Nacho Libre", "World Trade Center" and the recently released "Freedom Writers", that marked the beginning of a turnaround at Paramount. But the former television executive -- she came to Paramount from the Fox Broadcasting Co., where she had been president of entertainment -- found the transtion into the film arena a rocky one.

Grey said, "Gail's dedication in the last 18 months has been invaluable during this important and historic time at Paramount. We respect and appreciate her contributions in reshaping the direction of Paramount Pictures."

"From my days on Broadway to my time at Regency Television and Fox and then Paramount, my passion has always been creating exciting entertainment," Berman said.

Dubai fest hands out first Muhr awards

Dubai fest hands out first Muhr awards
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- The third Dubai International Film Festival ended Sunday with a ceremony for the inaugural Muhr awards.

Oliver Stone, on hand to receive the DIFF Salute for his contribution to cinema and present a screening of his World Trade Center, gave away the prizes to young Arab filmmakers. "It is hard to make films in the Middle East, but cinema can help bridge those divisions (within society)," Stone said. "This is a good attempt to reach out."

Actors Richard Gere, Robin Tunney, Adriana Barraza, Terrence Howard and Mos Def, Arab film personalities and Dubai royalty also were in attendance. The entertainment highlight was Jumana -- a multimedia play projected onto towering sand dunes and water screens.

Algerian feature "Barakat!" (dir: Djamila Sahraoui) took the festival's $50,000 first prize, while Lebanese film Falafel (dir: Michel Kammoun) earned silver and Moroccan entry "Why? O'Sea" (dir: Hakim Belabbes) took third place.

Said DIFF chairman Abdulhamid Juma: "Although a film festival's job is to showcase and not fund films -- as it causes a conflict of interest -- we are supporting regional cinema because there is no state financing available."

N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'

N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'
NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers.

'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod

'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod
NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers.

N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers.

'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and another fact-based feature, The Queen, Paul Greengrass' 9/11 drama was named best film at the New York Film Critics Circle awards after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards--two--including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

"'United 93' was really a dark horse," said Fine. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year." The chairman said its best film tie runoff with Queen was the first he'd experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said this year's other big 9/11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't really a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film Fine said ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won best nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won best animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won best foreign language film. Shadows was made in 1969 but never released domestically until this year. Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu also had a lot of support, according to Fine.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the best supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won best supporting actor for his portrayal of a pedophile in Todd Field's Little Children.

Guillermo Navarro won the best cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrynth, which was also a top contender for best film and other awards, according to Fine.

Bello, Sher, Gyllenhaal rise, shine

Bello, Sher, Gyllenhaal rise, shine
World Trade Center stars Maria Bello and Maggie Gyllenhaal and producer Stacey Sher will be the keynote speakers Dec. 5 at The Hollywood Reporter's Women in Entertainment breakfast at the Beverly Hills Hotel.

The annual breakfast event is held in conjunction with the publication of The Reporter's Women in Entertainment Power 100 special issue, now in its 15th year.

"We are delighted to have such a talented trio keynote this year's breakfast," said John Kilcullen, publisher of The Reporter. "They each have noteworthy achievements in their respective fields and represent the essence of the success that Women in Entertainment is designed to celebrate."

Bello and Gyllenhaal earned accolades from critics this year for their performances as the wives of two NYPD officers trapped in the rubble of the World Trade Center's twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. An Oscar-nominated producer, Sher served as producer on WTC, directed by Oliver Stone.

As part of the event, two-time Academy Award winner Meryl Streep will receive the 2006 Sherry Lansing Leadership Award.

Etheridge, Stone score on panels

Etheridge, Stone score on panels
The subtleties of dealing musically with the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks and the threat of global warming were addressed by director Oliver Stone and musician Melissa Etheridge, respectively, during panel discussions Tuesday at The Hollywood Reporter/Billboard Film & TV Music Conference.

Discussing his feature World Trade Center on a panel at the Beverly Hilton with his composer, Craig Armstrong, and music supervisor, Budd Carr, Stone said that Armstrong was not his first choice to score the picture. "John Williams turned us down", the Oscar-winning writer-director said. "I listened to dozens and dozens of composers."

However, Armstrong -- best known for his work with Baz Luhrmann on Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge! -- ultimately impressed Stone with his delicate approach. "It was very, very subtle music", Stone recalled. "The very first piano theme was right on."

Surprisingly, though shooting was well under way when the Scottish composer joined the project, Armstrong wrote his key theme on the basis of the script.

"It's very helpful to write away from picture, to get the emotional truth," Armstrong said.

The sensitive nature of the subject matter in "WTC" -- the struggle to rescue two New York policemen trapped in the rubble of the towers, and the impact of the search on their families -- was addressed by the filmmakers.

Etheridge, Stone score on F&TVM panels

Etheridge, Stone score on F&TVM panels
The subtleties of dealing musically with the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks and the threat of global warming were addressed by director Oliver Stone and musician Melissa Etheridge, respectively, during panel discussions Tuesday at The Hollywood Reporter/Billboard Film & TV Music Conference.

Discussing his feature World Trade Center on a panel at the Beverly Hilton with his composer, Craig Armstrong, and music supervisor, Budd Carr, Stone said that Armstrong was not his first choice to score the picture. "John Williams turned us down", the Oscar-winning writer-director said. "I listened to dozens and dozens of composers."

However, Armstrong -- best known for his work with Baz Luhrmann on Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge! -- ultimately impressed Stone with his delicate approach. "It was very, very subtle music", Stone recalled. "The very first piano theme was right on."

Surprisingly, though shooting was well under way when the Scottish composer joined the project, Armstrong wrote his key theme on the basis of the script.

"It's very helpful to write away from picture, to get the emotional truth," Armstrong said.

The sensitive nature of the subject matter in "WTC" -- the struggle to rescue two New York policemen trapped in the rubble of the towers, and the impact of the search on their families -- was addressed by the filmmakers.

Stone Shooting Olympic Promo

  • WENN
Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone is lending his movie expertise to 2008 Olympics host China to shoot a five-minute promo encouraging "cultural exchange". The World Trade Center filmmaker will film the project in capital city Beijing. In a statement organizers said it would form a "promotional video for cultural exchange between Beijing and the world." It will be shown on TV, in cinemas and on flights in China and abroad in the run-up to the sporting extravaganza. Stone says of the task, "Today, many peoples of the world can live in harmony, and China plays an important role. China and the United States are two big countries that should have more interaction. My goal in shooting this Olympic short film also lies in this - the need to build a harmonious international society." Other international directors lined up to promote China through short movies are Italian Giuseppe Tornatore and Iranian Majid Majidi.

Cineplex enjoys record Q3 revenue

Cineplex enjoys record Q3 revenue
TORONTO -- Canadian exhibition giant Cineplex Entertainment LP on Thursday posted improved earnings on record third-quarter revenues after acquiring the rival Famous Players Ltd. chain from Viacom a year ago.

Toronto-based Cineplex Entertainment, which operates 132 theaters nationwide, posted third-quarter earnings of CAN$9.3 million ($8.2 million) for the three months to Sept. 30, up 63% from earnings of CAN$6.1 million in 2005.

Cineplex Entertainment CEO Ellis Jacob attributed the record third-quarter revenue -- CAN$199 million, compared with a year-earlier $151.9 million -- to the strong boxoffice from Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, Talladega Nights, Superman Returns and World Trade Center.

Revenues at Cineplex Entertainment also were up after the exhibitor acquired 77 locations with 768 screens from Famous Players last year. Cineplex Entertainment subsequently agreed to sell off 35 Famous Players theaters to secure regulatory approval for the deal.

Cineplex Entertainment is 59% owned and controlled by the Cineplex Galaxy Income Fund, with the rest controlled by Canadian holding company the Onex Corp.

Chinese gov't pushes patriotic films

Chinese gov't pushes patriotic films
BEIJING -- Chinese authorities declared October as Golden Autumn Excellent Domestic Film Exhibition Month in a government-led campaign to promote the premieres of patriotic films.

All month long, theaters across China have been urged to favor titles such as My Long March, a paean to Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic.

The campaign delayed the premiere of Oliver Stone's World Trade Center and Michael Mann's Miami Vice until November.

Film executives said that the campaign is in keeping with a speech made by President Hu Jintao last December to mark the centenary of Chinese cinema. Hu, who has overseen a general crackdown on media freedoms here this year, called for film workers "to stick to the correct political direction at all times."

Executives and China scholars say that Beijing's intervention in the film business is discouraging to young filmmakers in an industry struggling to gain a footing in the increasingly global marketplace.
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites