6.5/10
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123 user 118 critic

Margaret (2011)

R | | Drama | 1 June 2012 (Italy)
Trailer
2:18 | Trailer

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ON DISC
A young woman witnesses a bus accident, and is caught up in the aftermath, where the question of whether or not it was intentional affects many people's lives.

Director:

Kenneth Lonergan
9 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anna Paquin ... Lisa Cohen
J. Smith-Cameron ... Joan
Mark Ruffalo ... Maretti
Jeannie Berlin ... Emily
Jean Reno ... Ramon
Sarah Steele ... Becky
John Gallagher Jr. ... Darren
Cyrus Hernstadt Cyrus Hernstadt ... Curtis
Allison Janney ... Monica Patterson
Kieran Culkin ... Paul
Matt Damon ... Mr. Aaron
Stephen Adly Guirgis ... Mitchell
Betsy Aidem ... Abigail
Adam Rose ... Anthony
Nick Grodin ... Matthew
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Storyline

Bothersome New York City high-school student Lisa Cohen (17), who consistently messes up her life and that of boy classmates, searches New York in vain for a fit cowboy hat to wear at an excursion with her separated father and stepmother. Spotting one on bus driver Maretti's head but failing to board, she stubbornly runs along and keeps claiming his confused attention, until the bus hits a blind senior, who is wounded fatally The NYPD quickly closes the case as an accident, but Lisa, duly consumed by guilt and spared any charge, starts bothering everyone and making a mean pest of herself, not only at home, as self-absorbed actress mother may deserve, but also in the precinct, tracking down the victim's uninterested kin out of town and even Maretti at home. A family friend lawyer gets involved in the case, digging in to compromising circumstances and causing real trouble to people who were of the hook. Written by KGF Vissers

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, sexuality, some drug use and disturbing images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 June 2012 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Margarita See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

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Box Office

Budget:

$14,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,525, 2 October 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$46,495, 23 October 2011
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (extended cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Martin Scorsese, despite being busy with Hugo (2011) and some other projects, agreed to edit the film for free. See more »

Goofs

There's a close-up shot of a New York Times article about the bus driver. The article says he works for the Metropolitan Transit Authority. The correct name is the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. See more »

Quotes

Emily: Because... this isn't an opera! And we are not all supporting characters to the drama of your amazing life!
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Connections

Referenced in English Vinglish (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Enough Is Enough
Written by Bobby Sunshine
Performed by Bobby Sunshine
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Hope opera
21 December 2011 | by rooeeSee all my reviews

On the day of its cinema release, Kenneth Lonergan's long-gestating drama was the most successful film in the UK. Problem was, it only opened on one screen. The story of Margaret's production is likely a fascinating story in itself, not least because of Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker's input into the final edit, which was presumably a return favour for Lonergan's work on the screenplay for Gangs of New York. But I'll focus on the fascinating story that Lonergan has told with this film.

Ostensibly the tale centres on a New York schoolgirl named Lisa (Anna Paquin, defining her young adulthood just as she defined herself in childhood with The Piano), who inadvertently causes a fatal road accident. What follows is the emotional aftermath, fought outwardly with her mother, as a moral and ethical war wages within her hormone-ravaged body.

The performances are excellent throughout, particularly Paquin and J. Smith-Cameron as the daughter and mother caught in gravitational flux. Jean Reno gives fine support as the sad-sack Ramon, while Matthew Broderick delivers the poem (by Gerard Manley Hopkins) that provides the film's title, while suggesting the entire life of his character by the way he eats a sandwich. It's that kind of film.

I recently wrote a review of Winter's Bone, which I described as an anti-youth movie. Margaret could be a companion piece in this regard, cautioning against the bright-eyed naivety of youthful independence, and promoting the importance of family. Like Winter's Ree, Lisa is a lost soul; unlike Ree, Lisa is not someone we admire. But she is always in focus; Lonergan expects not for us to like her, only to understand her. In maintaining this focus, Lonergan himself achieves the admirable: weaving a narrative whose minute details and labyrinthine arguments mirror the broader existential vista against which they are dwarfed.

Margaret goes deeper than Winter's Bone, delivering something pleasingly unexpected: a kind of Sartrean modern fable about the isolating nature of subjectivity. Like her actor mother on the stage, and like us all in our semi-waking lives, Lisa is the main player in her great opera. She performs the social functions that enable her to cling to a sense of belongingness, but something gnaws at her soul. And when, after the accident, she seeks some kind of meaning, she is met at once by indifference, before being seduced by those very institutions that make indifference normal. Nothing in the material world satisfies Lisa; nothing can match her aspirations. The suggestion here, I feel, is that our despair emerges from the disparity between that which we hope for and that which reality can deliver.

No wonder it took so long to find its way to a single UK screen: a three-hour existentialist play is a tough sell. Ten years after the towers sank to Ground Zero, Margaret joins There Will Be Blood, The Assassination of Richard Nixon, and (for some) Zodiac in the pantheon of modern classics that map the American psyche in the post-9/11 world.


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