6.5/10
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Margaret (2011)

R | | Drama | 1 June 2012 (Italy)
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A young woman witnesses a bus accident, and is caught up in the aftermath, where the question of whether or not it was intentional affects many people's lives.

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9 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Lisa Cohen
... Joan
... Maretti
... Emily
... Ramon
... Becky
... Darren
Cyrus Hernstadt ... Curtis
... Monica Patterson
... Paul
... Mr. Aaron
... Mitchell
... Abigail
... Anthony
... Matthew
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Storyline

Bothersome New York City high-school student Lisa Cohen (17), who consistently messes up her life and that of boy classmates, searches New York in vain for a fit cowboy hat to wear at an excursion with her separated father and stepmother. Spotting one on bus driver Maretti's head but failing to board, she stubbornly runs along and keeps claiming his confused attention, until the bus hits a blind senior, who is wounded fatally The NYPD quickly closes the case as an accident, but Lisa, duly consumed by guilt and spared any charge, starts bothering everyone and making a mean pest of herself, not only at home, as self-absorbed actress mother may deserve, but also in the precinct, tracking down the victim's uninterested kin out of town and even Maretti at home. A family friend lawyer gets involved in the case, digging in to compromising circumstances and causing real trouble to people who were of the hook. Written by KGF Vissers

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, sexuality, some drug use and disturbing images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

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Release Date:

1 June 2012 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

Margarita  »

Filming Locations:


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Box Office

Budget:

$14,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,525, 2 October 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$46,495, 23 October 2011
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (extended cut)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kenneth Lonergan was contractually obligated to deliver a cut of one hundred fifty minutes, but his preferred version ran close to three hours. Martin Scorsese (who had previously deemed Lonergan's cut a "masterpiece") and his longtime Editor Thelma Schoonmaker, were drafted to create an alternate edit. Their cut was similar to Lonergan's, and ran one hundred sixty minutes. See more »

Goofs

When Lisa visits her math teacher at home, her hands move between shots: when she is seen from behind the teacher her her arms are crossed, in the next shot they are beside her body, then they are crossed again. See more »

Quotes

Emily: Because... this isn't an opera! And we are not all supporting characters to the drama of your amazing life!
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Connections

Referenced in Honest Trailers: The Oscars (2017) (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Casta Diva
Written by Vincenzo Bellini
Performed by the Plovdiv Philharmonic Orchestra
Courtesy of Pocket Songs/Music Minus One
Vocal Performance by Christine Goerke
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
'Margaret, are you grieving?...It is Margaret you mourn for.' Gerald Manley Hopkins
12 July 2012 | by See all my reviews

MARGARET is and has been a troubled movie - sophisticated examination of one girl's post- traumatic transformation as part of a larger point about how one's notion of importance is dwarfed by the larger worldview. Written and directed by Kenneth Lonergan and shot in 2005 as a three-hour film, the movie has remained on the shelves since its completion in 2007 over legal problems and finally is available for viewing in a 150-minute version. Though it has flaws it contains some of the most sophisticated dialogue and philosophical points about where we are in our society today that the editing glitches become secondary background noise in a compelling film. The title (no one in the film is named Margaret) references the Gerald Manley Hopkins poem 'Spring and Fall: to a young child' which is quoted at the top of this review.

MARGARET focuses on a 17-year-old New York City high-school student Lisa (Anna Paquin) who feels certain that she inadvertently played a role in a traffic accident that has claimed a woman's life, Monica (Allison Janney): Lisa was chasing a bus whose driver Maretti (Mark Ruffalo) ran a red light because of Lisa's distraction trying to discover where the Maretti bought his cowboy hat. Monica dies in Lisa's arms while asking for her daughter also named Lisa (we later learn Monica's daughter died at age 12 from leukemia). Lisa at first feels sorry for Maretti, thinking that if she tells the truth Maretti will loose his job and his family support. Lisa's actress mother Joan (J. Smith-Cameron) encourages her to not give accurate testimony to the police, a decision Lisa follows and spends the rest of the film regretting, and in making attempts to set things right she meets with opposition at every step. Torn apart with frustration, she begins emotionally brutalizing her family, her friends, her teachers, and most of all, herself. She has been confronted quite unexpectedly with a basic truth: that her youthful ideals are on a collision course against the realities and compromises of the adult world.

The world that Lisa occupies includes teachers - played by Matt Damon (who crosses a forbidden line when Lisa seeks his advice as the only truly adult man she knows, Matthew Broderick whose class discussions over literature are brittle and acerbic and deeply disturbing - her introduction to adolescent needs and physical incidents at the hands of John Gallagher, Jr. (now of The Newsroom fame), Paul (Kieran Culkin) - her relationship with her needy single mother Joan whose newly dating Ramon (Jean Reno), her contact with the deceased's friend Emily (Jeannie Berlin - brilliant), and the deceased's only family - all in an attempt to somehow set things right but Lisa admitting that she is as responsible for Monica's death as is Maretti. But the world outside can't cope with anything but financial compensation as the resolution to Lisa's angst.

There are many other characters brought to life by some VERY fine actors and the stunning musical score by Nico Muhly includes moments at the Metropolitan Opera where we actually get to see and hear Christine Goerke as Bellini's Norma singing 'Casta Diva' and Renée Fleming and Susan Graham singing the Barcarolle from Offenbach's Tales of Hoffman, allowing the opening and closing of the film to be accompanied by a quiet guitar piece, as well as proving Muhly's very highly accomplished music to underscore the moods of the film. The cinematography by Ryszard Lenczewski underlines the tension - form the imagery of slow motion crowd movement in New York during the opening sequences to the stabilization of important encounters between the characters. A lot is said and screamed and the level of communication and actions by Anna Paquin's Lisa alienate the audience at times, but the film makes some very solid statements about how we are acidly interacting or not connecting in our current state of society. That deserves attention. The film requires a lot form the audience, but in this viewer's mind it is well worth the time.

Grady Harp


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