6.8/10
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2 user

Vremya sobirat kamni (2005)

| War | 2005 (Russia)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
David Bunners ... Leutnant Ohnesorg (as David C. Bunners)
Vladimir Vdovichenkov ... Captain Demin
Olga Krasko Olga Krasko ... Nela
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Andrey Fedortsov ... Vasily Muhin
Vladimir Menshov ... General
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Storyline

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Genres:

War

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Details

Country:

Russia

Language:

Russian | German

Release Date:

2005 (Russia) See more »

Also Known As:

Aeg korjata kive See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Mosfilm See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
A very welcome change of perspective on the Great Patriotic War
19 September 2006 | by cat-that-goes-by-himselfSee all my reviews

Among the movies on 2nd world war coming from Russia these last few years, "vremia sobirat' kamni" - "time for picking stones" (instead of throwing them, from the biblical quote) offers at last a vision that goes beyond brainless patriotism (Zvezda) or self-indulging nihilism (svoi).

It presents two people whose lives have been changed, and not for the better, by war. The third character, namely an interpret, is the go-between who will try to bridge the gap between them.

On a background of little Russian towns and villages, the trio comes across various situations, each one a symbol of the way people try to cope with a former enemy who comes to help them undo the wrong he thinks he helped to create.

True, the plot tends to be a bit heavy on sentimentalism and some of the scenes may lack finesse. But the intimistic approach of this mainly symbolic movie was a challenge, and I think the director and the three main actors did an excellent job despite a few awkward scenes. I especially liked the performance of Olga Krasko, thoroughly believable and moving.

Anyway, the movie succeeds in making its point. It is a message of tolerance, something sorely needed in the context of growing xenophobia, rewriting of history and nostalgia of the Empire reflected by the mainstream Russian blockbusters.


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