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New trailer for The Children Act starring Emma Thompson, Stanley Tucci and Fionn Whitehead

A24 has released a new trailer for Richard Eyre’s upcoming adaptation of the Ian McEwan novel The Children Act which stars Emma Thompson, Stanley Tucci, and Fionn Whitehead; watch it here…

Based on the best-selling novel by Ian McEwan (Atonement) and brought to the big screen by director Richard Eyre, The Children Act is a compelling and powerful drama telling the story of Fiona Maye (Emma Thompson), an eminent high court judge presiding over ethically complex cases. As the demands of her job cause her marriage to Jack (Stanley Tucci) to reach tipping point, Fiona is asked to rule on the case of Adam (Fionn Whitehead), a brilliant young boy who is refusing a life-saving blood transfusion on religious grounds.

With her private life in turmoil, Fiona finds herself drawn into the case, taking the unorthodox step of halting proceedings in order to visit Adam in hospital. As the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Emma Thompson Defends Fionn Whitehead in First Trailer for ‘The Children Act’

After opening to critical acclaim at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival, A24 and Directv have just released the first trailer for The Children Act. Showcasing aspects of a courtroom drama paired with familial emotional beats, the trailer follows Fiona May, a High Court judge played by Academy Award-winning Emma Thompson.

The film tells the story of May, as she judges a deeply personal court case regarding the survival of teenager Adam (Dunkirk’s Fionn Whitehead). Restricted by his religious beliefs, which are instilled in him through his Jehovah’s Witness practice, Adam refuses the blood transfusion that could prove crucial to his Leukemia treatment. Confronted by Adam’s beliefs, as well as dealing with a faltering relationship with her husband (Stanley Tucci), Fiona May finds this case to be especially taxing – and her journey seems to make for a rather compelling film.

BAFTA-nominated Richard Eyre directs the film,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Children Act’ Trailer: Emma Thompson Judges a Fateful Case in Oscar-Friendly Ian McEwan Adaptation

‘The Children Act’ Trailer: Emma Thompson Judges a Fateful Case in Oscar-Friendly Ian McEwan Adaptation
It’s been 25 years since Emma Thompson won Best Actress at the Academy Awards for her work in “Howard’s End,” but she may have another shot this year with “The Children Act.” Adapted by Ian McEwan from his own novel and directed by Richard Eyre, “The Children Act” tackles two pillars of modern society in one fell swoop: Religion and the law. From the look of the gripping first trailer, Thompson has found a challenging role and script worthy of her formidable talent.

The two-time Oscar winner plays British High Court judge Fiona, charmingly referred to as “My Lady” throughout the trailer, who must decide a life or death case concerning the fate of a teenage boy. In the midst of one of the most challenging cases of her career, her husband (Stanley Tucci) makes a shocking revelation that sends her into an emotional crisis. The case involves the
See full article at Indiewire »

Emma Thompson & Stanley Tucci struggle with their marriage in first trailer for The Children Act

The first trailer for Richard Eyre’s The Children Act, starring Emma Thompson and Stanley Tucci has landed.

Based on the novel by Atonement’s Ian McEwan, Thompson and Tucci struggle to keep their marriage afloat after her career starts to come first in their life.

Emma Thompson stars as Fiona, a high-court judge who sees her marriage to Jack, portrayed by Stanley Tucci, break down when she takes on the complex case of young Adam, played by Fionn Whitehead (Dunkirk), who is refusing a life-saving blood transfusion on religious grounds.

Also in trailers – Margot Robbie flaunts her womanly wiles to get what she wants in new UK trailer for Terminal

The film is scheduled for a UK and Ireland release on August 24.

The Children Act Official Synopsis

Based on the best-selling novel by Ian McEwan (Atonement) and brought to the big screen by director Richard Eyre, The Children Act
See full article at HeyUGuys »

First UK Trailer For ‘The Children Act’ With Emma Thompson & Stanley Tucci

The first trailer for the upcoming adaptation of Ian McEwan’s The Children Act has arrived online, along with the first poster.

Based on the best-selling novel by Ian McEwan (Atonement) and brought to the big screen by director Richard Eyre, The Children Act is a compelling and powerful drama telling the story of Fiona Maye (Emma Thompson), an eminent high court judge presiding over ethically complex cases. As the demands of her job cause her marriage to Jack (Stanley Tucci) to reach tipping point, Fiona is asked to rule on the case of Adam (Fionn Whitehead), a brilliant young boy who is refusing a life-saving blood transfusion on religious grounds.

With her private life in turmoil, Fiona finds herself drawn into the case, taking the unorthodox step of halting proceedings in order to visit Adam in hospital. As the two form a profound connection and powerful emotions come to light,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Trailer, poster and images for The Children Act starring Emma Thompson, Stanley Tucci and Fionn Whitehead

Entertainment One has released a trailer, poster and images for the upcoming drama The Children Act. Based on Ian McEwan’s novel of the same name, the film is directed by Richard Eyre and stars Emma Thompson, Stanley Tucci, and Fionn Whitehead; take a look below…

Based on the best-selling novel by Ian McEwan (Atonement) and brought to the big screen by director Richard Eyre, The Children Act is a compelling and powerful drama telling the story of Fiona Maye (Emma Thompson), an eminent high court judge presiding over ethically complex cases. As the demands of her job cause her marriage to Jack (Stanley Tucci) to reach tipping point, Fiona is asked to rule on the case of Adam (Fionn Whitehead), a brilliant young boy who is refusing a life-saving blood transfusion on religious grounds.

With her private life in turmoil, Fiona finds herself drawn into the case, taking the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘King Lear’ Trailer: Anthony Hopkins Brings the Doomed King Back to the Screen for BBC

‘King Lear’ Trailer: Anthony Hopkins Brings the Doomed King Back to the Screen for BBC
Nothing can come of nothing, but much can come of Shakespeare. Anthony Hopkins plays the doomed monarch in the latest adaptation of “King Lear,” which comes to BBC Two tomorrow before Amazon brings it to this side of the pond. “Iris” and “Notes on a Scandal” helmer adapted and directed. Watch the trailer below.

Here’s the synopsis, which gives away a great deal for those who aren’t familiar with the Bard’s tragedy: “The 80-year-old King Lear divides his kingdom among his daughters, Goneril, Regan and Cordelia, according to their affection for him. Cordelia refuses to flatter him, so he banishes her. Having acquired power, Goneril and Regan expel their father from their homes. At the same time, Lear’s prime minister, Gloucester, is betrayed by his son Edmund and his other son, Edgar, is forced to go into hiding. Lear becomes mad, Gloucester is blinded: both the
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Eyre: ‘Take it easy? Why would I… I’m only 75’

The acclaimed director talks about adapting King Lear for TV with Anthony Hopkins, accidentally making a French film and dealing with depression

Devon-born director Richard Eyre, 75, has worked across film, theatre, TV and opera, winning five Olivier awards and a Bafta. He was artistic director of the National Theatre from 1987 until 1997 and his films include Iris and Notes on a Scandal. He has adapted and directed the BBC’s new, feature-length version of King Lear.

You’re working in New York at the moment. How’s it going?

Very well. Our production of Long Day’s Journey Into Night, which was playing in the West End, has opened at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. I would even say it’s been received with rapture [laughs].

Tony’s portrayal of Lear is very much based on his father. It’s remarkable. I can’t imagine the part being better played

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard Eyre: ‘Take it easy? Why would I… I’m only 75’

The acclaimed director talks about adapting King Lear for TV with Anthony Hopkins, accidentally making a French film and dealing with depression

Devon-born director Richard Eyre, 75, has worked across film, theatre, TV and opera, winning five Olivier awards and a Bafta. He was artistic director of the National Theatre from 1987 until 1997 and his films include Iris and Notes on a Scandal. He has adapted and directed the BBC’s new, feature-length version of King Lear.

You’re working in New York at the moment. How’s it going?

Very well. Our production of Long Day’s Journey Into Night, which was playing in the West End, has opened at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. I would even say it’s been received with rapture [laughs].
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

First look at Anthony Hopkins, Florence Pugh in BBC's 'King Lear'

First look at Anthony Hopkins, Florence Pugh in BBC's 'King Lear'
The adaptation by BAFTA-winning director Richard Eyre premieres this spring.

The first image from BBC Two’s King Lear, directed by Richard Eyre (Notes On A Scandal), has been revealed, showing Anthony Hopkins’ Lear embracing his youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh).

This contemporary version of Shakespeare’s play will have the eponymous monarch controlling a totalitarian military dictatorship in England. Alongside Hopkins and Pugh are Emma Thompson (The Remains Of The Day) and Emily Watson (Breaking The Waves) as Goneril and Regan, Jim Broadbent (Iris) as the Earl of Gloucester, Andrew Scott (Sherlock) as Edgar and John Macmillan (Hanna) as Edmund.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars spotlight: Could Olivia Cooke and Anya Taylor-Joy (‘Thoroughbreds’) be a modern-day ‘Thelma and Louise’?

“Thoroughbreds” opened March 9 to strong reviews (76 on MetaCritic, 86% freshness on Rotten Tomatoes). The black comedy is especially noteworthy for the lead performances by Anya Taylor-Joy as Lily, a teenage girl full of resentment, and Olivia Cooke as Amanda, her friend who doesn’t feel anything. Together they plot to kill Lily’s domineering stepfather Mark (Paul Sparks). Could these youthful offenders be a modern-day “Thelma and Louise” at the Oscars?

Cooke’s star has been on the rise in recent years, starting with a breakthrough role on “Bates Motel” (2013-2017) as Emma, a friend of a young Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) who suffers from cystic fibrosis. Then she co-starred as the title dying girl in “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” (2015). So playing sociopathic Amanda is a significant departure, and it’s a deceptively challenging role. Expressing a lack of emotions is the opposite of what actors are typically asked to do,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 14 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

The three years following “Adaptation” (2002) did not produce an Oscar nomination for Meryl Streep – her longest drought since the early 1990s, following “Postcards from the Edge” (1990). That is not to say, of course, that these years were without substantial Streep contributions to the big and small screens and stage.

Sans a brief cameo portraying herself in the Matt DamonGreg Kinnear conjoined twins comedy “Stuck on You,” Streep did not grace the silver screen in 2003. She did, however, hit the television circuit in a big way with her reunion alongside filmmaker Mike Nichols on the HBO production of Tony Kushner‘s “Angels in America.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s: Whoopi Goldberg, Angelina Jolie, Judi Dench … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1990s: Whoopi Goldberg, Angelina Jolie, Judi Dench … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actress went to a wide swath of talented actresses in the 1990s, including Whoopi Goldberg, Marisa Tomei, Anna Paquin, Judi Dench and Angelina Jolie. A surprising amount of comedic performances won this category in the ’90s, especially for an academy that typically prefers drama. Which Best Supporting Actress winner is your favorite?

Check back on all the former champs and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actress.)

Whoopi Goldberg, “Ghost” (1990) — Whoopi Goldberg became the second black actress to win an Oscar thanks to her scene-stealing role as scheming psychic Oda Mae Brown in “Ghost.” She was previously nominated in Best Actress for “The Color Purple” (1985). Goldberg is one of only 12 individuals to have won the Egot, a.k.a. the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cate Blanchett to Serve as Jury President at Cannes 2018

Blanchett in “Truth”

Cate Blanchett is set to serve on one of the world’s most glamorous juries. Cannes Film Festival has announced that the two-time Oscar winner is their 2018 Jury President.

“I have been to Cannes in many guises over the years; as an actress, producer, in the marketplace, the Gala-sphere, and in Competition, but never solely for the sheer pleasure of watching the cornucopia of films this great festival harbors,” she said.

Blanchett famously took film execs to task when she accepted an Oscar — her second — for “Blue Jasmine” back in 2014. She criticized those in the industry “who are still foolishly clinging to the idea that female films with women at the center are niche experiences.” She declared, “They are not [niche experiences]. Audiences want to see them and, in fact, they earn money. The world is round, people.”

Last year Cannes juror Jessica Chastain addressed the depictions of women she saw at the fest.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Judi Dench Could Nab an Oscar Nod for Playing Queen Victoria, Again: Career Watch

Judi Dench Could Nab an Oscar Nod for Playing Queen Victoria, Again: Career Watch
In this edition of Career Watch we take on Judi Dench, who at 83 is a full-on movie star and could earn her eighth Oscar nomination for the title role in Stephen Frears’ “Victoria & Abdul.”

Bottom Line: Dame Judi Dench far prefers theater (it offers more control than director-centric moviemaking), but she’s also a marquee draw in TV and movies. She’s always stellar no matter the material (see: “The Chronicles of Reddick”), and she’s a real draw for (older) moviegoers, from two-hander “Notes on a Scandal” opposite Cate Blanchett to Dench’s other franchise, “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.”

Career Peaks: Forty years after her stage debut as Ophelia at the Old Vic, Dench broke out in 1997 in “Mrs Brown” as Queen Victoria, earning her first Oscar nomination. (She notoriously claimed that she had Harvey Weinstein’s name “tattooed on my bum, which I hadn’t. I
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Judi Dench Could Nab an Oscar Nod for Playing Queen Victoria, Again: Career Watch

Judi Dench Could Nab an Oscar Nod for Playing Queen Victoria, Again: Career Watch
In this edition of Career Watch we take on Judi Dench, who at 83 is a full-on movie star and could earn her eighth Oscar nomination for the title role in Stephen Frears’ “Victoria & Abdul.”

Bottom Line: Dame Judi Dench far prefers theater (it offers more control than director-centric moviemaking), but she’s also a marquee draw in TV and movies. She’s always stellar no matter the material (see: “The Chronicles of Reddick”), and she’s a real draw for (older) moviegoers, from two-hander “Notes on a Scandal” opposite Cate Blanchett to Dench’s other franchise, “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.”

Career Peaks: Forty years after her stage debut as Ophelia at the Old Vic, Dench broke out in 1997 in “Mrs Brown” as Queen Victoria, earning her first Oscar nomination. (She notoriously claimed that she had Harvey Weinstein’s name “tattooed on my bum, which I hadn’t. I
See full article at Indiewire »

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Original Score

  • Indiewire
2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Original Score
As usual, several of Hollywood’s top composers offer multiple contenders for Best Original Score, among them usual suspects Hans Zimmer and Michael Giacchino. Zimmer’s experimental score for action spectacular “Dunkirk” was inspired by Christopher Nolan’s pocket watch, and an improvised piano riff was the spine for Denis Villeneuve’s dystopian epic “Blade Runner 2049.”

That score was composed in collaboration with his credited protege Benjamin Wallfisch, who also worked on “Dunkirk” along with Lorne Balfe, but only two could be submitted to the Academy, so Zimmer filed alone. Wallfisch also composed “It.”

Read More:Oscar 2017: It’s Hans Zimmer’s ‘Dunkirk’ vs. ‘Blade Runner 2049’ for Best Original Score

The creative collaboration between Zimmer and Wallfisch on “Blade Runner 2049” was co-equal (following the departure of Jóhann Jóhannsson because of “creative differences” with Villeneuve). After Zimmer created a haunting theme (which became “The Mesa”), the composers then
See full article at Indiewire »

Sarah Bolger, Andrew Simpson Board Abner Pastoll’s ‘A Good Woman Is Hard to Find’ (Exclusive)

Sarah Bolger, Andrew Simpson Board Abner Pastoll’s ‘A Good Woman Is Hard to Find’ (Exclusive)
Once Upon a Time” actress Sarah Bolger has joined Abner Pastoll’s crime-thriller “A Good Woman Is Hard to Find” alongside Edward Hogg (“Taboo”) and Andrew Simpson (“Notes on a Scandal”).

Bolger was recently in AMC’s “Into the Badlands,” and will star in upcoming Starz series “Counterpart” opposite J.K. Simmons. Her movie credits include Mary Harron’s “The Moth Diaries” for IFC, “The Lazarus Effect” for Blumhouse and “The Spiderwick Chronicles” for Paramount.

Pastoll, best-known for French-set horror thriller “Road Games,” directs the feature, which follows a young mother (Bolger) trying to protect her kids while investigating the truth behind her husband’s murder.

Jane Brennan (“Brooklyn”), Packy Lee (“Peaky Blinders”), Caolan Byrne (“The Foreigner”) and Josh Bolt (“Nowhere Boy”) complete the cast. Academy Award nominee and BAFTA winner Ronan Blaney (“Booglaoo and Graham”) wrote the script for the film, which is set in Belfast and will be released next year.

Shooting is currently
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson to lead all-star cast of BBC Two’s King Lear

BBC Two and production company Playground have announced that Anthony Hopkins (The Dresser, Nixon, Silence of the Lambs) and Emma Thompson (The Children Act, The Remains of the Day, Sense and Sensibility) are set to lead the cast of a star-studded adaptation of William Shakespeare’s King Lear from BAFTA-winning director Richard Eyre (The Dresser, Notes on a Scandal).

Set in the fictional present, King Lear sees Anthony Hopkins as the eponymous ruler, presiding over a totalitarian military dictatorship in England. Emma Thompson stars as his oldest daughter Goneril, with Emily Watson (Theory of Everything, Genius) as his middle daughter Regan and Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth, Marcella) as Cordelia, the youngest of Lear’s children.

Jim Broadbent (Iris, Game of Thrones) takes the role of the Earl of Gloucester, Andrew Scott (Sherlock, The Hollow Crown) as his loyal son Edgar and John Macmillan (Hanna, Chewing Gum) as his illegitimate son Edmund.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Children Act’ Review: Emma Thompson Is Absolutely Brilliant in an Uneven Ian McEwan Adaptation

  • Indiewire
‘The Children Act’ Review: Emma Thompson Is Absolutely Brilliant in an Uneven Ian McEwan Adaptation
Richard Eyre’s “The Children Act,” which “Atonement” writer Ian McEwan has adapted to from his own novel of the same name, begins with Jude Fiona Maye (an extraordinary Emma Thompson) imposingly perched behind the bench of her London courtroom and adjudicating an urgent case about conjoined twins. If the babies are left attached, both of them will die. If the decision is made to split them apart, then one will live. Each course of action, it could be argued, is its own kind of murder. That’s certainly how Fiona feels about it; cloaked in immense power but still empathetic to a fault, the judge — who ultimately rules in accordance with the 1989 Act of Parliament from which this film gets its title — can’t shake the idea that saving one life would mean ending another. For her, it is “A case of law, not of morals.”

When Fiona returns
See full article at Indiewire »
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