The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006) Poster

User Reviews

Review this title
495 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
Best Performance: Anything Not Moving
Michael_Elliott8 May 2013
The Fast and The Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006)

* (out of 4)

The third film in the series has redneck teen Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) being sent to Tokyo to live with his father. Once there he gets mixed up with another high school punk who just happens to be the nephew of a powerful gangster (Sonny Chiba). The first film in this series was good and the follow-up wasn't too bad when you considered everything that it was. This third film, however, is a complete disaster from the word go and it's rather shocking that this here didn't put an end to the entire series. I'm not going to overstate something by calling this one of the worst movies ever made because it isn't. However, I'm really not sure I can say this isn't one of the dumbest movies ever to come out of Hollywood. When you look at the budget of this thing one really has to wonder where it all went because it's obvious that nothing was spent on an acting coach. This film contains some of the worst acting I've seen from any professional movie. There are moments here that are simply so bad that you can't help but want to laugh at the scene and this is especially true during the introduction to the Sean character when he picks a fight with a football jerk. There's really nothing but one bad performance after another and it really makes you wonder if perhaps the director simply didn't care because he knew no one goes to a film like this expecting "acting." This might be true but you have to give us something better than this. I also found the racing scenes to be quite boring and they're actually worse than what was in the second film. They lack any real imagination and I'd argue that they rarely make any sense. THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS: TOKYO DRIFT is a pretty awful film from the word go but at least we get to see Chiba but at the same time it's sad seeing him waste time in something like this.
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Pointless instalment in the series
Leofwine_draca11 July 2016
TOKYO DRIFT is the unwanted second sequel in a film franchise that seems to have absolutely zero point in existing – unless it's to get teenage boys to part with their pocket money. Each film is a stultifying excuse for flashy cars to be raced around and wrecked while attractive women in little clothing look on and cheer or boo as required. The first movie saw Vin Diesel playing a bone-headed racer in one of his worst performances; the sequel kicked him away and left wooden leading man Paul Walker to make a mess of his duties. This film does away with them both in favour of Lucas Black, a guy who I used to like when he was a child actor in '90s TV series American Gothic.

Nowadays Black is all grown up and as typically handsome-but-wooden as any other actor. He seems to have lost his charisma but then all the cast of this film live in a charisma-free zone. The light story sees him packed off to Japan to curb his racing tendencies, but inevitably he runs foul of a Yakuza gang when he starts racing again. It's same old, same old, with stock supporting characters and an uninteresting cast – aside from a cameoing Sonny Chiba, still proving his worth in a fun role as a mob boss.

These films are all about the races and these ones are pretty predictable. There are some interesting crashes and a few stunts here and there, but my heart wasn't really in any of them. I could enjoy the explosive chases in a film like DEATH RACE but I couldn't stop yawning as I watched the races here. They're serviceable perhaps but they're not going to set anybody's world alight. Then the film ends with a laughable twist that sets things up for yet another needless sequel. When are these guys going to give up?
1 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
It's actually alright
SnoopyStyle30 March 2014
American teen Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) gets into serious trouble street racing. He is set to go to jail, but then he is sent off to live with his military dad over in Tokyo. His dad's rules are to go to school and don't drive. Almost immediately, he breaks the second rule, makes an enemy of D.K., and gets in debt to Han (Sung Kang).

Lucas Black is a good solid actor. It makes up for the fact that most of the film had none of the original cast. Sung Kang who would go on to play Han in other F&F movies is very effective. The same cannot be said for Bow Wow or Nathalie Kelley. It's mostly Bow Wow who sticks out like a sore thumb, and it has nothing to do with him being black. The cars are pretty like always in the franchise. The drift driving is interesting for about a minute. The chases have been done better. There is a bit too much CGI in the chases. The one thing that is great about this movie is the Japanese locations. It's nice to see the franchise really go to Tokyo.
1 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Target audience stuff - noisy, full of rootless action, devoid of characters and convincing plotting , it sounds and looks like nothing more than an extended music video
bob the moo19 April 2007
When yet another town sees Sean Boswell getting into trouble with the law, his mother sees no choice but to send him out of the US to live with his father in Tokyo, Japan. However it is not long before Sean gets involved in the illegal racing scene yet again. Taking in by Han, Sean immediately clashes with DJ, the son of Yakuza Kamata over the racing and also the latter's girlfriend Neela.

Three films into this franchise and nobody is really even pretending that anyone is here for the characters or plotting subtleties. So instead we have a choppy script that expects us to buy the laziest and nonsensical plot devices yet – witness the way that Sean gets in with Han, it makes little sense but the script doesn't let that bother it as it blunders onwards. What it blunders towards is the thinnest of excuses for lots of car chases, load music, male posturing and sexy girls in skimpy clothes. That the plot is poor is a given and it is probably not worth getting into it because I don't think the makers were aiming for more.

It is also perhaps unfair to criticise them for this because they hit their targets with ruthless efficiency. Knowing their target audience the makers deliver the goods when it comes to what male teenagers will be looking for and it does it in noisy spades. There are lot of shiny toys and lots of races full of unlikely moves and screeching tyres. Personally I found them repetitive and lacking the tension and involvement that comes with action built on top of strong characters and stories but if all you want is the gloss then I can see why it would appeal. What I found a little less easy to swallow was the film's treatment of women. At best the women are love interests with a bit of history but the majority of skimpily clad and dancing – quick to flock to the male characters and always ready to give out phone numbers. Lesbians kissing in a corridor are thrown into the mix for no reason other than titillating the male viewers. It is nothing new in this type of film but it is tiresome to see it – is this the message we want to send to teenage boys!? The cast are average to a man. Black is pretty poor and I quickly tired of his accent and his character. He rarely manages to hold the attention when sharing the screen with anyone and is thus not a great leading man – even at this level. Bow Wow is at least fun and he benefits from not really taking it too seriously – in the more serious moments he is weak but that is to be expected. Tee is a solid presence in the baddie role but, with more dialogue to undermine him, Kang is not up to much. Kelley is cute but is not given much more to work with. I thought she did the job but not much more than that. Sonny Chiba buys the movie cult points in a cameo. Lin directs like one big pop video but not a very imaginative one since he revels in the obvious touches of flair and lacks imagination in his delivery; good for what the audience wants but is that all he wanted to achieve?

Overall then a film that does what you expect of it, which will either be a good or bad thing dependant on your viewpoint. It is noisy, full of rootless action, devoid of characters and convincing plotting and at times sounds and looks like nothing more than an extended music video – which is just what it is I suppose. Knows its target audience really well (depressingly well) but will have little to offer those outside this limited demographic or seeking more.
19 out of 49 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Catch my drift
Prismark108 July 2016
Despite featuring none of the stars (but for a surprise cameo at the end) from the original films, this third instalment and its modest box office success convinced Universal Pictures that there was mileage in the Fast and Furious series.

Director Justin Lin re-tooled the franchise, introduced the elements and a kinetic style that would carry on when Paul Walker and Vin Diesel return for the fourth part.

Tokyo Drift has the southern drawl of Lucas Black who plays Sean Boswell a troublesome teenager regularly in trouble with the police. A disastrous drag race against a rich kid is too much for his mother who sends him to Tokyo to live with his father and attend high school there even though he does not speak a word of Japanese he apparently goes to a regular school rather than some international one.

Before long Sean flirts with the girlfriend of DK (the drift king) who is the nephew of the Yakuza kingpin and falls in with the underground racing scene that features the skill of drifting.

Sean starts to work for the mysterious hustler Han (Sung Kang) who teaches him how to drift and he ends up challenging DK for top dog status after a tragic accident.

Although largely set in Japan the film still manages to have a multi ethnic cast and an urban soundtrack that the films have become noted for. However the story is thin, there are no outlandish heists or preposterous plotting. Lucas Black is just too blank as the lead and it is no surprise that the enigmatic Sung Kang was the more intriguing actor hence why he featured in the subsequent films.

Do note that a crash scene was later retconned in the closing credits of Fast & Furious 6.

The film has its flaws but it is also an important chapter in the creative team of Lin and Morgan. They would continue with the Fast & Furious films, bring back the original stars and makes this into one of the most profitable modern franchises around.
1 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Nod
kosmasp11 August 2009
The movie tries to go back and catch the essence of the first movie. It might not (really) have any actors from the previous installments, but the "Fast & Furious" feeling is there ... and wait til the end for a little surprise (unless someone told you or you read it, you won't really expect it).

The thing is, the stunts are top notch, really good. But the story doesn't carry through Lucas Black seems to loathe every minute he is on screen, while cursing his agent, who got him the role(?). Even Paul Walker felt more "right" in the franchise. If you wanna fast forward and watch the stunts, you might add a point or two to my vote.
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift
jboothmillard7 December 2009
Warning: Spoilers
This was the third film in the non-stop high octane franchise full of cool and fast cars racing and chasing each other, including lots of action and some stunts along the way, directed by Justin Lin (Fast & Furious, Fast Five, Fast & Furious 6). Basically Sean Boswell (Jarhead's Lucas Black) is a teenager and school student in Alabama who has got into trouble too often and has a record for illegal high speed street racing, so his mother sends him to live with his father, U.S. Navy Lieutenant Boswell (Brian Goodman) in Tokyo, Japan to avoid time in prison. Sean ends up in a cramped apartment in a low-rent section of the city, in his new school he befriends fellow American and "military brat" Twinkie (rapper Shad 'Bow Wow' Moss) who introduces him to the world of the drift racing scene in Japan. Though forbidden from driving, Sean competes in deadly speed races with heart stopping courses of hairpin turns and switchbacks, taking on "Drift King" D.K. (Austin Powers in Goldmember's Brian Tee), who has connections to Japanese organised crime syndicate the Yakuza. Sean grows in presence and his talent for drifting, but he is getting close to the Japanese mafia, thousands of dollars are coming into play, but also his life is in stake, eventually he is able to escape the crime underworld, and allowed to stay in the country to continue his passion for racing. Also starring Sung Kang as Han, Nathalie Kelley as Neela, Zachery Ty Bryan as Clay, Caroline de Souza Correa as Isabella, Keiko Kitagawa as Reiko, Shin'ichi Chiba / JJ Sonny Chiba as Uncle Kamata and a cameo from Vin Diesel as Dominic Toretto. This is the only film of the franchise without either Diesel or Paul Walker, so it feels odd, but Black is reasonably good as the bad boy teenager influenced by the drifting craze, the rest of the cast are fine as well I suppose. To be honest, the storyline going on is not the thing to pay the fullest attention to, it is the pedal-to-the-metal stuff, all the colourful and cool cars fuelled up, with extra rocket boosters and switches, that speed and crash their way around, and the explosions and stunts along the way keep the pace up as well, it taking place in Tokyo only adds loads of neon light filled sequences, it slows down mid way and only picks up a little towards the end, but all in all it's an alright action thriller. Worth watching!
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
A new cast in a new city
Tweekums17 December 2015
Warning: Spoilers
This film may be part of the 'Fast and the Furious' series but, apart from a brief cameo, it features an entirely different cast. Instead of being centred on undercover cop Brian O'Conner it follows teenager Sean Boswell who is sent to live with his father in Tokyo after destroying his car in a street race. His father forbids him from having anything to do with cars but it isn't long before a classmate introduces him to the local 'drift racing' scene. Here he has a run in with DK, the best racer and nephew of a local Yakuza, who isn't happy about Sean talking to his girlfriend. Sean challenges him to a race and DK's friend Han Seoul-Oh lends him a car… which he promptly destroys; if he is going to race he will have to learn how to drift. Han teaches him how to drift while Sean works for him to earn the money to pay for the wrecked car. It isn't long before DK and Han's friendship ends when it becomes apparent that Han has been skimming money. This ultimately puts Sean in his sights; Tokyo isn't big enough for the both of them; a drift race down a treacherous mountain road will determine who stays.

At first I was a little bit disappointed that the character Brian O'Conner wasn't in this as the first two films were about him. New character Sean Boswell is entertaining and Lucas Black does a good job in the role even though he looks too old to be in high school… I can't think why they didn't make the character older as that would have also have avoided the ludicrous idea that an American teen who doesn't speak a word of Japanese would go to a Tokyo high school. Still this film is all about the characters racing their cars and the race scenes are exciting; this is particularly true of the final race down what looked like the most dangerous road in Japan. The appearance of Sonny Chiba as DK's Yakuza uncle was enjoyable and a cameo from a familiar character should leave fans very happy as the film comes to an end. Overall I enjoyed this as good mindless fun even though it is weaker than the first two films.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
The drivers, the cars and the Drift races are the real stars of this movie , well directed on Tokyo location
ma-cortes8 April 2008
This is an exciting narration of drifting auto racing with exceptionally fine camera work and great car chase sequences and crashes on the metropolitan streets. It deals about a rebel American adolescent named Shawn Boswell(Lucas Black as a determined race-car driver) challenges his contender for a race cars, causing wreak havoc racing 195 mph through streets. To avoid the jail, his mother(Lynda Boyd) sends him Tokyo where is his father(Brian Goodman) as US military. Meanwhile the newcomer Shawn tries to ingratiate with Twinkie(Nathalie Kelley) and the world of racing in Japan, and hoping to join his extended group. In Tokio he discovers the underworld of the Yazuka and competes against Drift kingpin who is niece of mobster chief(Sonny Chiba who does a credible job).

The picture mingles action-packed,drama, exciting pursuits cars, suspense, a little bit of violence and spectacular sequences though won't mean much on little screen TV. Flashy, noisy race-cars set in the Japan by the producers, -the famous Neal Moritz-of first part. Pulse-quickening action but plenty of clichés and lots of dirty driving and heavier on crashes than coherency. All stunts were performed by authentic experts without people damage. Special cameo by Vin Diesel and appearance by Sonny Chiba, a Kung Fu idol of the 70s. Justin Lin's direction(previously made Annapolis and Better Luck tomorrow) is competent though the story eventually run out of gas. Justin Lin is directing the third part with Vin Diesel, Michelle Rodriguez and Jordana Brewster. The movie gives new meaning to the term ¨Tuning¨and ¨Drifting¨. The flick will like to adrenaline lovers and those young people looking for strong emotions. This is the kind of film in which the cars enthusiastic will enjoy immensely, it's a must see for cars fonds.
4 out of 8 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
A slight departure for the franchise.
BA_Harrison20 December 2015
When teenage road-racer Sean Boswell (Lucas Black, who is too old for the part, but hey-ho) gets in trouble with the law for a third time, he avoids a jail sentence by going to live with his father in Tokyo; there, he becomes involved in the drift racing scene, coming to blows with DK (Brian Tee), the nephew of a powerful Yakuza.

Tokyo Drift gets short shrift from some Fast & Furious fans because it steers the franchise away from the US street racing scene and because it doesn't star series regular Paul Walker. While it might be a slight step down from the previous entries, being a little too teen-centric with its predictably troublesome high school protagonist, I don't think it's all that bad. As a fan of all things Japanese, I can appreciate the colourful Tokyo setting, the Yakuza storyline, and, of course, all those oriental cuties in extremely short skirts.

Director Justin Lin, who went on to helm parts 4, 5 and 6 in the series, handles the car scenes with aplomb, each race shifting up a gear in terms of adrenaline-pumping action. Drifting—sliding the car around sharp corners at high speed—adds a new level of excitement to the action, with a mountain road finale offering plenty of nerve jangling, edge-of-the-seat moments. The film closes with the reappearance of a familiar face, paving the way for further instalments.
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
Throw off the timeline
BandSAboutMovies5 August 2020
Warning: Spoilers
Justin Lin comes into the franchise here and, well, he has none of the original cast members coming back. So what do you do? Concentrate on the cars. Also, the chronological history of the story would change from here on out, with installments until 2015's Furious 7 being set between 2 Fast 2 Furious and this movie.

Yes, you'd be shocked how confusing - and deep - these movies go. I watched all of them within a day or two, so I'm still amazed how we go from street gangs to the family basically being the G.I. Joe team.

High school student Sean Boswell keeps getting arrested for street racing, so he is sent to live in Japan with his father. There, he discovers, well, street racing. Are you surprised? There he meets Twinkie (Bow Wow), who gets him in and he starts doing that Tokyo Drift, as they say.

Sung Kang, who plays Han Lue, originated that role in Lin's movie Better Luck Tomorrow. He'd return in Fast & Furious, Fast Five, Fast & Furious 6 and Furious 7, as well as the short film Los Bandoleros, all set between the events of Better Luck Tomorrow and this movie. Han's explosive car crash was revisited in post-credits scene of Fast & Furious 6, which introduced Jason Statham's Deckard Shaw.

Boswell would return in Furious 7, while he, Kang and Twinkie will all be back for F9. How is Kang still alive? We'll see.

Following poor test screenings, Vin Diesel agreed to make a cameo as Dom in exchange for Universal's ownership to the rights of the Riddick series and character. No money exchanged hands. I'm always amazed at how canny Diesel is. This allowed him to make 2013's Riddick as an independent film. Also, of course Dom won in the race against Boswell. Come on.
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Maybe it's only for car enthusiasts
Gordon-1115 May 2015
This film tells the story of a young American guy who gets into trouble in his town because he won a street race with a rich kid. He moves to Tokyo to join his father and hopefully stay out of trouble, but he soon gets into more trouble by mixing with the criminal underworld of Tokyo.

"The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" has a thin plot that revolves around cars and fights. It is not so interesting for me to hear car engines roar, and look at extended shots of cars that are supposedly fancy. The other thing that annoys me is that I have a very hard time believing that there really is such a racing subculture in Tokyo. People dress like that in Japan! And the main characters look too out of place in a Japanese local school!

I remember the first "The Fast and the Furious" literally blew me away with its action and passion. This one is just a bore. Maybe it's only for car enthusiasts.
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Practical
tedg7 July 2006
Summer movies, what a zone to enter! What a collection of thrills, disappointments and adventures of different kinds! Sometimes for me they take me to a sublime place: "King Kong," "Van Helsing." Most times its just noise.

If its cinematic, I'll credit it with space in my life. Yes, I know the first two F&F were considered dumb, not worthy. Some of that I think is a residual class bias in the US. Muscle cars and racing has always been a trailer park thing. True enough and the stories, all three of them are cluttered with cultural touchstones: dumb, honest, sublegal. And the trailer park notion of girls as prizes.

Well, if you are serious about movies, you pretty much ignore the stories. And in summer movies you know the icons transcend their cultural places and move to a grander cinematic place. So a hillbilly isn't a hillbilly, more of a hillbillybillboard.

The real appeal is in whether it is cinematic or not.

Now this is a tricky issue, and a matter of taste. Tarantino, for example, obnoxiously advertises the cinematic overloading of "Bill," but that's just inventory, right? The Coens seem more genuine and satisfying.

But with the Fast and Furious projects, the idea was a nostalgic one, to recall an obsolete cinematic value: the car chase. More, to do it without computer graphics, but with camera angles now common from the CGI era. In movielanguage, this is called doing it "practically," meaning with real cars, mountains, cameras.

Computer graphics is still enough artificial that we know the difference. That matrix highway fight or any one of the mission impossible deals might be exciting, but there's an extra edge to knowing that something is real. Like a Buster Keaton or Harold Lloyd stunt.

The first F&F simply mined this. I liked it enough to consider my cinematic mind massaged. The second one obviously responded to market research that showed huge ticket sales in Asia. So they retooled the whole thing, both in the story (Asian girls, Asian cars), in the style (neon) and in the film-making itself.

A huge hit in Asia. US viewers were almost disposable.

Now this third one: actually set in Tokyo though filmed in LA. Its a step down in style: the production design is not nearly as polished and cool, instead it is more industrial, cheaper to do. The F&F production sponsors clearly are settling in for the long haul where they can make one of these every year or so indefinitely. Oddly, the sexy bodies — traditionally the cheapest thing you can get — are played down in this one.

Anyway, the real value in this is the camera rush. There's some cool folding at the race at the end where phonecams merge with the cameras we see through. We become the spectators on the side of the road.

Ted's Evaluation -- 2 of 3: Has some interesting elements.
4 out of 8 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
The best one yet
bevo-1367831 March 2020
Easily the best FATF. I like the bit with the cars
1 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Tokyo Drift
Scarecrow-8828 September 2006
Warning: Spoilers
I like Lucas Black. He's the kind of actor that isn't limited by his southern accent and has the ability to always play believable characters even if they are stuck in genre films like this second sequel to the "race-car" franchise which has a lot of cars speeding and crashing with some plot thrown in to distract some. In this film Black is saddled with limited story to somehow overcome what is essentially a cliché part and create something out of it. For the most part, he succeeds. He plays this unfortunate teenager stuck in the role of "magnet"..he always seems to link himself to trouble. With no other alternative but jail, Lucas' Sean Boswell is sent to Tokyo where his military dad resides to somehow stay away from hot-rodding. It doesn't matter where Sean goes, he is destined to be placed a position to race for something, whether it's for high-stakes or good ole' fashioned pride. He rubs a yakuza boss' nephew the wrong way almost instantly, but finds an ally in Han(Sung Kang, who is really the best thing about the film next to Black)..someone who seems connected to DK(the yakuza boss' nephew, played with a twisted look of menace by Brian Tee), but only by business standards.

DK(Drift King)is known as the best racer and one who is indeed feared. He takes his role as yakuza nephew very seriously. Heck, even DK's smile is a snarl. He has a girl by his side named Neela(Nathalie Kelley)who has a thing for Sean..she is pretty much his trophy to show off(Neela was taken in by DK's grandmother we learn so that seems to mean she's his girl by default). Bow Wow adds flava and soul as Twinkie, an army brat like Sean who fulfills his goal as token black kid by selling goods for profit. He also does what he can with a cliché role.

The film pretty much uses story as padding for all the dangerous races. Within the sub-plot we learn that Han has been stealing from DK, so this sets in motion a death and climactic race to end all races between Sean and DK..loser must leave Tokyo for good. The place the big happens is up a curvy mountain known to only be driven by one man..DK.

I feel bad for Lin who must sacrifice story for stylish chases. His "Better Luck Tomorrow" was right the opposite. The characters in that film were able to grow in a very fascinating story. It's not the case here. People come to a film like this for the cars that rev up and the speedy, lightning-quick turns down highways in traffic(one scene show Sean almost drive into a crowd of people). The film shows how "drifting" is the way to race in Tokyo. Drifting is a high-profile way of turning curves with delicate precision without hitting anything.

To be honest, the whole film is ridiculous and it's hard to believe one ounce squeezed from this formula racer. Black tries to embody his young man with truth because he has nowhere else to go..he's at the end of his rope and this climactic race may be his last chance to really put an end to the dangerous lifestyle that always followed right at his feet.
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
The low point of the franchise?
poolandrews6 August 2010
Warning: Spoilers
The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift starts as teen troublemaker Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) gets into an illegal street race with a high school bully named Clay (Zachery Ty Bryan) who both end up crashing their cars. To avoid a jail sentence Sean is shipped out to Tokyo to live his father (Brian Goodman), during his first day at a Japanese school he befriends Twinkie (Bow Wow) & falls in love with Neela (Nathalie Kelley) who is the girlfriend of school bully D.K. (Brian Tee) whose uncle is a powerful Yakuza boss. As the two clash because of their cultures, backgrounds & Neela the only way the grudge can be settled & scores avenged is by a good old illegal street race where the winner takes all & the loser leaves Tokyo forever...

This American German co-production was directed by Justin Lin & after watched the previous film in the series 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003) mere hours before I can honestly say I think I was too hard on it since The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift is even worse with even less going for it. For those bothering to keep count The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift is in fact the third film in the bafflingly popular franchise that seems to exist purely to show of irresponsible people driving cars really fast, having lots of scantily dressed women in the background of as many scenes as possible & use awful Rap music whenever possible. Once again at over one hour & forty minutes long there just isn't enough plot here to fill the time so there are endless scenes of expensive & shiny looking cars screeching along or crowds of onlookers cheering which is just boring. While the previous two Fast and the Furious films mixed their vehicular based action scenes around some sort of thriller plot The Fast and the Furious: Toky Drift mixes it's high speed action with high school drama as Sean gets into trouble in Japan & at school, he gets in trouble with his father, with his classmates, with the Yakuza, with school bullies & even dates the wrong girl too. Of course as a character Sean is paper thin & nothing that happens to him will interest you at all, the rubbish script can't even throw in some decent action to liven things up so we have huge chunks of Sean & his personal problems taking up the majority of the films running time before the end when he manages to solve all of his problems in one go by winning an illegal street race, as you do.

It seems everyone in Japan actually speaks English so Sean doesn't have much of a problem adapting. The whole gimmick here is that Tokyo is a pretty cramped city so all this drifting comes into play while racing, I already knew what drifting was since I have Need for Speed on my mobile phone(!) so I was right there in the moment straight away. I just knew what was going down right away, if you know what I mean. The action scenes aren't that great, again it just seemed like expensive looking cars screeching along the road more than anything else & the metaphor at the end with the American muscle car beating the slinky & stylish Japanese one has slight racist overtones. This may sound a bit sexist but the only real reason I have given The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift a half decent rating is because the Japanese girls on show in the background of many scenes dancing look hot, there are some seriously good looking birds on show here & I found it more enjoyable to look at the really hot Japanese girls than watch the film in general. Hey, I'm easily pleased, so sue me.

Like the previous films the Rap music is awful & there's these odd bouncy pop songs that sound like they are sung by Japanese girls on helium, is this what Americans think the Japanese listen too? Although set mainly in Tokyo in Japan most of the film was shot in California. The acting is bad, Lucas Black as the anti authoritarian boy racer has no personality at all & is as wooden as they come, hell even Paul Walker wasn't as bad as this in 2 Fast 2 Furious. Bow Wow (does he sign cheques like that?) proves that Rappers should never act because they can't.

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift is even worse than 2 Fast 2 Furious which even surprised me, apart from a couple of half decent action scenes & lots of really hot looking Japanese girls this has nothing going for it. Followed by Fast & Furious (2009) which I presume explains Vin Diesel's cameo at the end.
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
Good racing sequences get lost in a movie with too much talk and similarities to other films.
dbborroughs25 June 2006
High school kid who gets caught racing one time to many is sent off to Tokyo to live with his father. There he finds himself mixed up in the Japanese underworld and racing once more in the "drifting" style.

This movie has great car sequences, some good characters, some nice lines of dialog and by all rights it should have worked but the film frequently loses sight of whats going on its own world and so we're left to twiddle our thumbs.

After a good set up to the story the action moves to Japan. Our hero's dad lays down the law he's to go to school and not race. After an initial run in about staying out late the film jettisons the notion that anyone is in school or that the kid has a curfew and concentrates on the characters and the romance. This would be fine, except that after 20 minutes of set up there really isn't any sort of racing for about 40 minutes (I know I checked my watch). From that point on the film shoots to its conclusion in a rapid and entertaining fashion. Unfortunately the the damage is done and you're not as fully engaged as you should be. Its not bad, hey I didn't walk out, but its not what it should have been.

I have to say that the one thing that really bothered me about the movie is that the film is very similar to the Chinese film Initial D, especially in its climatic race. Actually it seemed like a mobbed up version of Initial D with violence added to the story of racing. Its not fatal, but if they wanted to remake that film why change so much of the story?

Worth a look on video or cable. Not worth 10 bucks in theaters.
1 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
"Tokyo Drift" Charts A Change of Pace
zardoz-1317 February 2014
Warning: Spoilers
"Better Luck Tomorrow" director Justin Lin's "The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" qualifies as a departure from the norm for a franchise. First, the action takes place in Asia instead of Los Angeles. Second, until the ending, we don't see anybody familiar. Although the hero is a misunderstood misfit, he isn't anything like the major characters in the previous films. Lucas Black plays a high school kid who is attracted to trouble, but he isn't a professional thief or a public servant. As Sean Boswell, he winds up in Tokyo and has to prove himself in an entirely different culture. Inevitably, our hero clashes with the nephew of a Yakuza boss played by the legendary martial arts superstar Sonny Chiba. Lin does a terrific job orchestrating some complicated action, especially the scenes where drivers drift. The drifting here, particularly during a town race, is breathtaking stuff. On the basis of its stunt driving, ""The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" ranks as a good movie. Of course, the Chris Morgan screenplay is shallow, but he fills the action with interesting characters. Lucas Black is terrific as the fish-out-of-water hero. Brian Tee makes a first-class villain as TK, while Sung Kang is appropriately laid-back and cool as a glacier. Superior stunts, adrenalin-laced races, and a sympathetic protagonist make this "Fast and Furious" installment a breath of fresh air.
9 out of 13 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Same old, same old.
Boba_Fett113810 June 2011
Even though at the time of the release of the first two movies I was part of the targeted audience group, I never have been impressed with any of the 'The Fast and the Furious' movies and that while I actually do enjoy cars and racing.

Again, they attempted to make things a bit different again, by setting the movie in a different country and by starring new different actors in the leading roles. But really, it's just the same stuff all over again. They pretend as if the movie is all about drifting but in the end it's still a movie about street racing. A bunch of tough talking macho men hanging around with their pimped cars, not realizing what complete losers they actually are. They act as if racing and cool looking cars is all that matters in life and are even willing to put their lives at risk for it. What's even more disturbing is that in these movies always the lives of dozens of innocent bystanders also get threatened but the movie makes it seem like that's a cool thing.

The whole scene like it gets portrayed in these movies is so totally ridicules and unrealistic. Why are all these nice looking girls hanging around with these guys every night in their party outfits? How do these hipsters who look like they never worked a day in their lives got all that money from for all those expensive looking cars? And why do they think that racing a car is the answer to every problem in life? Sorry, I just can't take the whole vibe of the scene and its atmosphere that the movie sends out.

But no, that really isn't the biggest problem of these movies. I mean they still could really work out as hip and fun entertaining movies but yet so far the first three movies completely failed at this. It's not hard to see why; the stories are so disturbingly lacking.

I think this movie even had the worst story out of three movies so far. Why even let the story take place in Tokyo in the first place? Seriously, this movie could had just as easily been set at any random American city. Just a marketing trick to make it seem as if this movie is being renewing and different from the other ones. But there also really isn't much good happening in the movie. Once you start analyzing it you see that all it is is some racing, than some hot girls again (I can't believe the amount of ass-shots in this movie. You should make a drinking game out of it) and then some more racing. This goes on and on, till the movie its end. I seriously wish there was some more substance to it and there actually was plenty of room and opportunity for that, with some of the movie its characters (the dad, the girlfriend, perhaps even with the Sonny Chiba character).

The characters in this movie also form one major problem. There just isn't really likable enough and the movie is really lacking some star power behind it. Yes, believe it or not but this movie really could had uses some Vin Diesel or Paul Walker in it, as one of the main leads. I would had even gone for Tyrese but that's just because I wasn't that happy with Lucas Black, who talks like Jodie Foster and all he does is looking tough, without any acting behind it.

The race sequence, what these movies are all about in the first place, just also didn't impressed me all that much. I often had a hard time figuring out what was going on because of the way it got shot and edited. I also kept on forgetting why they were racing in the first place, which was all because of its lacking and very uninteresting and unrealistic story.

Really the worst out of the series so far. At least I think, cause I don't remember that much about the weak previous two.

4/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/
1 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
Great car racing, okay everything else
Calicodreamin10 August 2019
The car racing in Tokyo drift is fairly realistic, definitely exciting, and takes up more time in the movie than it's predecessors. Which is refreshing, seeing as the basis of the movie is racing cars. The plot is a little thin, in that there really isn't one for the majority of the movie. The last few minutes it pulls something together to end the movie. Acting is a little subpar, the main character is a bit dry, but it doesn't detract too much. Don't go in expecting an Oscar worthy performance and you'll be pleasantly surprised by the quality of action.
3 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
A Different Type of Street Racing
Uriah4316 January 2017
Constantly in trouble due to illegal racing, a high school senior named "Sean Boswell" (Lucas Black) is sent to live with his father who is in the military and stationed in Japan. When he gets there he immediately gravitates to a group of other students his age who are also involved in racing fast cars. However, because of the limited space in Tokyo the sport has changed to one that involves negotiating extremely tight corners in either an underground parking garage or a narrow road along the side of a mountain. The problem Sean has is not only that he is not used to this type of racing-known as drift racing--but also that his main rival is an arrogant punk named "Takashi" (Brian Tee) who is extremely jealous whenever his girlfriend, "Neela" (Nathalie Kelley) even looks at another guy. And there is some definite chemistry between her and Sean. It also doesn't help that Takashi thinks he can do whatever he wants because his uncle, "Kamata" (Sonny Chiba) is a high-ranking member of the Yakuza. One other problem is that Takashi is also extremely good at drift racing. In any case, with all of these areas of disagreement it is only a matter of time before Sean and Takashi have it out and when they do the stakes will be very high. Now, rather than reveal any more I will just say that this movie certainly had some good moments here and there. Unfortunately, there were some scenes which were a little over-the-top and which caused the film to seem a bit uneven. That being the case, I rate this movie as about average and recommend it only to those who might enjoy a film of this type.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
May this be the last movie of this series
view_and_review15 June 2008
"If You Ain't Outta Control, You Ain't In Control." Who comes up with these taglines? Are you serious? What terrible advice for anyone. I can just imagine a father telling his son, "if you ain't outta control, you ain't in control". Thanks to that advice your son is now a delinquent.

One of my worries when I watch movies is that the movie will be predictable. Of course a lot of movies you expect to be predictable and it doesn't detract from the movie because of how well the movie is done. Everyone knew the Titanic would sink and that movie made a billion dollars. Tokyo Drift on the other hand was predictable and horribly done. I guess the producers got tired of suped up Japanese cars in America so they moved the action to Japan and figured the change of scenery would make the movie fresh. No. Everything played out virtually the same down to the American car being used at the end.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
I nearly drifted away several times.....
FlashCallahan5 May 2014
Warning: Spoilers
After totalling his car in a street race, Shaun Boswell is sent to live with his father, in Tokyo, to avoid jail.

While in school, he befriends Twinkie, who introduces him to the world of racing in Japan.

Forbidden to drive, he decides to race against the "Drift King", who has ties to the Yakuza, but loses, totalling the car because of his lack of knowledge of drifting, racing that involves dangerous turns.

To repay his debt, he enters the underground world of drift street racing.

As he becomes better and better, he must finally prove his worth in that world by once again racing The 'Drift King'....

The mind boggles that this franchise went from strength to strength after two really lethargic, unleaded sequels.

The second was bad enough, but at least it had Walker in it. This however, has some guy who looks like an anorexic Josh Duhamel, trying to give it the Swagger that the original cast had, but failing miserably.

But not only that, he has Lil' Bow Wow, or whatever you call him now as company, doing the best impression of Glenn Plummer in Speed.

Tokyo looks great though, and we have a special guest star come the end, but its a really poor movie, empty and shallow, much like an ex-girlfriend of mine....
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
Asian short skirted chicks and cars
trashgang23 September 2013
To be honest, this has nothing to do with the franchise storywise. Sure, it contains a lot of car chasing and racing but overall this should have been given another title, leave out The Fast And The Furious, should just have been called Tokyo Drift. Maybe I overreact because toward the end there's a link to the franchise. And nowadays we all know that Lucas Black as Sean returns in part 7.

I can understand that teenagers will love this flick due the beautiful girls in it. And car lovers are looking forward to see the old school Ford Mustang towards the end but there's nothing more to pick up here then pedal to the metal scene's. On part of the story it's all so predictable. You know it, this is just about cars and racing and the racing sequences are the series' meat.

If you love gleaming cars and short skirted Asian temptresses then this is your thing. But the teaser towards the end with Vin returning makes you looking forward to entry 4. As much as I didn't like him in the first entry here he shows in 1 minute were it's all about.

Gore 0/5 Nudity 0/5 Effects 4/5 Story 2/5 Comedy 0/5
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
A Nutshell Review: The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift
DICK STEEL28 July 2006
Warning: Spoilers
The Fast and the Furious franchise relies on the simpleness of 2 factors to attract an audience from boys to men - sexy cars and fast babelicious chicks, topped up with plenty of testosterone and adrenaline in overdrive. Racing cars of all makes, be they the European, American or Asian models, one thing's for sure, the stunt driving team deserves all the credit. The first movie made a huge star out of Vin Diesel, while the rest had relatively smaller shots at glory, from Paul Walker, who returned for the second, to babes like Eva Mendes, Michelle Rodriguez and Devon Aoki.

The third installment decided to insert refreshing elements, and set itself in the land of the rising sun. Presumably influenced by the driving technique called drifting, which made it to mainstream consciousness via the Japanese manga Initial D, it's just too bad that the Hong Kong movie by Andrew Lau and Alan Mak, adapted from the manga, got to it first, like almost a year ago. Perhaps if the latest shenanigans of racers from both sides of the Causeway were widely publicized, this film could even be made closer to home! (In case you're wondering, the Malaysian police had recently conducted a dragnet rounding up illegal racers on its North South Highway. Flashy cars with raunchy stakes - the winner gets to take home the loser's chick for a night's worth of lurve)

There will be no doubts, comparisons between the East's Initial D, and this one from the West. In my opinion, this one edged out Initial D. There are many aspects in which Tokyo Drift is superior, and naturally having a bigger budget means that the filmmakers can afford to put more cars on showcase, more cars involved in races, and more races in varied locations like a tight car park, on the streets of Tokyo, and as a homage too to the source, they couldn't miss the mountain range. Scenes were for both day and night, unlike Initial D's predominantly night scenes.

It's never about the acting, though Tokyo Drift will lose out in terms of having relative rookies helm the show throughout, unlike Initial D's stellar supporting cast of Chapman To, Anthony Wong, to established popular teeny-boppers like Edison Chen and Shawn Yue. But Tokyo Drift did have veterans like Sonny Chiba lend a hand, and the coup was the casting of Keiichi Tsuchiya, the original inspiration for the manga, in a cameo.

Taking over the lead role from Paul Walker and Vin Diesel is relative newcomer Lucas Black as Sean Boswell, a good for nothing troublemaker with the inborn need to speed. He comes from a broken home, and is the root cause of his and his mom's moving from city to city, because he cannot get out of trouble from the law. When the final straw broke the camel's back, he gets sent reluctantly to live with his father in Tokyo.

Thinking that the Asian city has nothing to offer, before you can say "drift", he finds himself drawn into the world of underground racing, with plenty of flashy cars, hot chicks and mean Yakuza-linked punks itching to challenge anyone to a race. As clichés rule over this movie, Sean falls for the Drift King's (Brian Tee) main squeeze Neela (Nathalie Kelly, thought she looked like a cross between Paula Abdul and Rosario Dawson), while unwittingly got brought under the wings of Han (Sung Kang), business partner of Drift King, who teaches him the true meaning and purpose of drifting (which is a no-brainer purpose of snagging hot chicks).

Anyway, to a gaijin, Sean is ignorance personified, from culture to racing, he takes these challenges head on, stupidly. And surprise! A movie like this offered some one-dimensional character development of troublemaker turned good, who learns the meaning of brotherhood, although fame did get into the way of course. But herein lies another strength against Initial D, the lead did not turn out to be "all powerful" - here he has to learn the basics of drifting in an incredible short period of time, and turn out well of course, at the expense of expensive tyres, and cars (always a pain to see them being wrecked).

Any racer worth his salt must pimp his ride or zhng his car, and this one offered no less. The star attraction in the franchise are the vehicles. From the Nissans to the Mustangs, it seemed that the Mitsubishi Evo will be a mainstay, and the hero always drives one. It's almost a no- brainer to film movies like these, having stunt drivers to do the actual stunt driving, then cut to actors looking as if they're driving, and insert multiple cuts of hands on steering, foot on pedal, looking mean, etc. Instead of just incessantly focusing on drifting, there are the standard zig-zagging car chases, and some usage of Nitro for that quick boost of horsepower, which the first two movies frequently used.

Given its ending by an uncredited cameo which will send fanboys of this franchise into highs, this movie still has potential to be relatively popular and the franchise can indeed continue. It wouldn't be far out if there's an announcement of The Fast and the Furious: North-South Highway, and yes, you heard it here first! So race away, and unabashedly indulge in this movie that makes no apologies for being fast and furious to the loud sounds of its contemporary soundtrack!
4 out of 7 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews


Recently Viewed