As an actress begins to adopt the persona of her character in a film, her world becomes nightmarish and surreal.

Director:

David Lynch

Writer:

David Lynch
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4,042 ( 531)
4 wins & 20 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Karolina Gruszka ... Lost Girl
Krzysztof Majchrzak ... Phantom
Grace Zabriskie ... Visitor #1
Laura Dern ... Nikki Grace / Susan Blue
Jan Hencz ... Janek (as Jan Hench)
Ian Abercrombie ... Henry the Butler
Karen Baird Karen Baird ... Servant
Bellina Logan ... Linda
Peter J. Lucas ... Piotrek Krol
Amanda Foreman ... Tracy
Jeremy Irons ... Kingsley Stewart
Justin Theroux ... Devon Berk / Billy Side
Harry Dean Stanton ... Freddie Howard
Cameron Daddo ... Devon Berk's Manager
Jerry Stahl ... Devon Berk's Agent
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Storyline

After an uncomfortable, borderline disturbing visitation by a cryptic neighbour, the fading movie star, Nikki Grace, is thrilled to hear that she has just landed herself the female lead role in director Kingsley Stewart's sensational Southern melodrama called "On High in Blue Tomorrows". However, as she gradually disappears into her complex role, Nikki's character, Susan Blue, starts to emerge from the labyrinthine pathways of her unconscious, creeping into her delicate consciousness. More and more, as Nikki's dissociation becomes more aggressive, and her self-transcendent experience sets in motion a sometimes subtle, sometimes profound transformation, parallel worlds interweave, and a mysterious lost girl tuned into the TV sitcom, Rabbits (2002), begins to take shape. Is Stewart's ambitious project doomed to fail? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Story of a mystery...A mystery inside worlds within worlds...Unfolding around a woman...A woman in love and in trouble. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some violence and sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

A sample of dialogue from the film is sampled in Burial's intro track, Untitled, of the 2007 album, "Untrue". See more »

Quotes

Nikki: Damn! This sounds like a dialogue from our script!
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Connections

References Braveheart (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Anaklasis für Streicher und Schlagzeug
Written and Performed by Krzysztof Penderecki
Published by Moeck Verlag (BMI)
Courtesy of EMI Classics
Under license from EMI Film & Television Music
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User Reviews

 
The film Lynch has been working towards all his career
10 October 2006 | by Thelonius_SpunkSee all my reviews

I just saw this film at the New York Film Festival followed by a Q & A session with David Lynch, Laura Dern, and Justin Theroux. I will try my best to recount my thoughts while they are fresh, and incorporate what the film maker and actors had to say.

"I can't tell if it's yesterday or tomorrow and it's a real mind f---"

This single quote from Laura Dern sums the movie up fairly well. It is also one of the self- referential moments of the film that explores the audiences very thoughts while providing some comic relief.

Lynch's new film, INLAND EMPIRE, is similar to his other work, but unlike anything he's ever done, or I've ever seen before. As one reviewer aptly put it, it is a double reference to Hollywood and the inner workings of the human brain. Before I discuss the substance of the film I will briefly review the technical aspects.

First of all, the movie is not unwatchable (because of clarity purposes) as some critics had said, although I did see it at the Lincoln Center which has a beautiful theater and top quality facilities. The digital camera works well for this film. It lose some of the cinematic flourish of film, but also brings a more realistic, gritty feel to it that is appropriate for the theme. The lighting and production were top quality as usual for a Lynch film and the score sets every scene brilliantly. Often times we can't tell if the sound is diegetic or non-diegetic, but it makes no difference.

Lynch said that he used the digital camera to give him freedom. You can see much more movement in this film than his others, giving an almost voyeuristic feel. He also uses many close shots, and as always, obscure framing allowing ambiguity and confusion. Lynch really explores the freedom of movement and editing that is available with digital, and you can feel his energy and zest in the new medium. The moments of suspense and terror are so well done - there are several scenes that will literally make you jump - that I found a Hitcockian brilliance of using subtlety, indirectness, and sound to convey emotion rather than expensive special effects. Of course, there are other scenes that would qualify as downright freaky.

The movie is completely carried by Laura Dern, and not because she is in 90-95% of the scenes. Her character(s) morph and change so often in identity and time that it is hard to believe it is her in every role. Her range and ability to work consistently over so many years and under the conditions of this film is mind blowing. It is one of the finest performances I've seen by an actress or actor.

The film itself is hard to summarize. Most of you know the basic plot, but this really means nothing about the film. It has no type of linear story line and the converging and diverging plot lines are connected by only the most simple threads, time, location, memory ("Do I look familiar? Have you seen me before?") identity, and people who are good with animals. It would be a disservice to this film to try to find meaning or symbolism as I see some people already are. It is not a mystery to be solved, as Mulholland Dr. was (though that film never will be solved either). It is a movie that plays off of ideas, color, mood, it presents intangible emotions that we feel and internalize rather than think about and solve. Film doesn't need a solution to make sense, but it is typical for us to want solve things, to have closure. This film is better if you just let it wash over you and surrender the urge to find meaning.

The three hour running time makes no difference because the movie moves in and out of itself with no regard for time. Using so many scenes allows time to effect the viewer much as the characters themselves. As the characters question time and reality, the audience does too. As the scenes slowly build up, giving us reference, we start to wonder where we saw that character, who said that line before, what location fits into what part of the sequence and how, leading up to the Laura Dern quote I used before. It doesn't ask us to think, but to feel, and it does this better than any film I've seen. It plays on our emotions with intense sound and cinematography, grasping fragments from dreams, sliding in and out of reality, exploring nightmares, and asking us what time and reality really are. The film is also very self-conscious as I said before, and also makes many subtle (and not so) pokes at the audience. It also has some truly surreal moments of Lynch humor.

Explaining all this doesn't really matter because you will have to see it and take your own idea from it. I would recommend that you see it in a theater though, as it could never have the same impact anywhere else. I was skeptical going into this movie after what I had read, thinking Lynch had gone off the deep end. However, I realized nothing you read about it will make a difference once you see it, and that Lynch is in better form than ever. Ebert said that Mulholland Dr. was the one experiment where Lynch didn't break the test-tube. With INLAND EMPIRE he throws the lab equipment out the window. His freedom in making this movie, both with medium and artistic control, is unparalleled in anything he's done. He finally made a movie for himself and his vision, without any kind of apology or pretense.


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Details

Country:

France | Poland | USA

Language:

English | Polish

Release Date:

7 February 2007 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Inland Empire: A Woman in Trouble See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$27,508, 10 December 2006

Gross USA:

$861,355

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,046,144
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Camerimage Film Fest)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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