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Joanna Scanlan: ‘Who would play me in the film of my life? A Nick Park claymation’

The actor on crying at Blue Planet, being unable to say no and driving Tilda Swinton’s car without insurance

Raised in Wales, Joanna Scanlan, 56, became an actor in her mid-30s. Her TV work includes the comedy series The Thick Of It, Rev and No Offence, and she was nominated for a Bafta for Getting On, an NHS comedy that she co-wrote and starred in. Her film roles include Notes On A Scandal, In The Loop and Testament Of Youth. Most recently, she starred in the BBC drama Requiem, which is out now on DVD. She is married and lives in London.

When were you happiest?

Swimming down the Thames on a full moon night 10 years ago. It was dangerous, but extremely joyful.

Related: Ralph Ineson: ‘You probably get one commercial for 20 utter humiliations’

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

I Got Life! (Aurore) Review

  • HeyUGuys
Everyone fears the process of aging. It unleashes realisations of mortality, nostalgia, regret, and the dreaded loss of youth. The French are no strangers to these ideas, but director Blandine Lenoir tackles these topics with a comedic and feministic twist. Instead of viewing the existential problems of middle-class, intellectual men – the convention in many European movies, as well as in lauded literature – Lenoir gives us those of a working-class woman for a change.

I Got Life! follows middle-class waitress Aurore (Agnès Jaoui) as she endures a difficult mid-life crisis, with many problems surfacing and re-surfacing in this stressful period. As well as hot flushes, she loses her job, her eldest daughter Marina (Sarah Suco) announces her pregnancy, and she bumps into an old lover (Thibault de Montalembert). Aurore must try and keep her head together, but proves difficult as she keeps getting into funny and irritating situations.

Like many French films,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Armando Iannucci on the Tragedy and Comedy of ‘The Death of Stalin’ and Needing to Dial Down History

Armando Iannucci has spent the last decade of his career lampooning the contemporary politics of America and the United Kingdom in projects like Veep, The Thick of It, and In the Loop, but his new film directs his considerable satiric skills at a simultaneously perversely appropriate and unlikely target: Stalin-era Soviet Union. An adaptation of Fabian Nury and Thierry Robin’s graphic novel dramatization of the same name, The Death of Stalin is filled with Iannucci’s trademark barbs at institutional efficiency and labyrinthian insults but also freighted with a newfound urgency in his filmmaking.

With an unimpeachable cast of movie stars, TV stars, and even stage legends, The Death of Stalin makes a feast of the banal and horrifying absurdities that were commonplace during the period without losing the persistent undercurrent of tragedy and anxiety. Less a historical recreation than a comedic channeling of the spirit of the time,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Death of Stalin’ reviews: Armando Iannucci may go from Oscars to Emmys and back to Oscars with latest satire

‘The Death of Stalin’ reviews: Armando Iannucci may go from Oscars to Emmys and back to Oscars with latest satire
The British satire “The Death of Stalin” opened in America on March 9 after having already made an impression at the BAFTAs, where it was nominated for Best British Film and Best Adapted Screenplay. But its mastermind, director and co-writer Armando Iannucci, is already familiar to the American awards scene. Can he go from the Oscars to the Emmys and back to the Oscars again?

Iannucci was known in the UK for series like “I’m Alan Partridge” and “The Thick of It” before making his first big impact across the pond. In 2009 he spun off “The Thick of It” into the political satire “In the Loop,” which explored the behind-the-scenes bumbling that led the Us and UK into an ill-advised war in the Middle East. That film earned Iannucci and his co-writers an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay, and it led him full-time into the world of American political
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rotterdam 2018 Review: The Death Of Stalin Makes You Laugh At A Corrupt Tragedy

We're big fans of Scottish writer/director Armando Iannucci here at Screen Anarchy, and have been ever since he was doing short comedic skits on the BBC. The man is now of course most famous for his series Veep, The Thick of It and his film In the Loop, which was a scathing take at how the United Kingdom got pulled into a recent war. In his new film The Death of Stalin, Iannucci is no less scathing, and screenings of the film have in fact been forbidden in Russia, even though the events depicted in them happened 65 years ago. The official reason is that the film is seen as a foreign attempt at influencing the upcoming elections in Russia, "which is something that is...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Dev Patel to star in Armando Iannucci's 'modern take' on David Copperfield

The Slumdog Millionaire actor will play the title role in The Personal History of David Copperfield, from The Death of Stalin director

Dev Patel is set to star in The Personal History of David Copperfield, a reworking of Charles Dickens’ novel from The Thick of It creator Armando Iannucci.

According to Variety, Patel will take the lead in the film, which “will offer a modern take on Dickens’ title character as he navigates a chaotic world to find his elusive place within it”. Iannucci will direct, from a screenplay co-written with his long-time writing partner, Simon Blackwell.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Dev Patel to Star in Armando Iannucci‘s ‘David Copperfield’ Film (Exclusive)

Dev Patel to Star in Armando Iannucci‘s ‘David Copperfield’ Film (Exclusive)
Dev Patel is set to play David Copperfield in FilmNation’s new retelling of Charles Dickens’ “The Personal History of David Copperfield,” which will be directed and written by “Veep” creator Armando Iannucci.

The project will offer a modern take on Dickens’ title character as he navigates a chaotic world to find his elusive place within it. The original “David Copperfield” was first published in 1850 and describes the journey of the titular protagonist — who was modeled after Dickens himself, from impoverished childhood to becoming a successful author, thanks to perseverance and despite a lack of personal discipline.

Kevin Loader and Iannucci will produce the feature, which was developed with FilmNation. He is directing from a script he wrote with Simon Blackwell.

Iannucci and Blackwell previously collaborated with Tony Roche and Jesse Armstrong on the script for 2009’s “In the Loop,” which received an Academy Award nomination.

Iannucci created HBO’s political comedy “Veep” as an adaptation of his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Armando Iannucci Reveals More Details About His “Space Tourism” HBO Series ‘Avenue 5’

Perhaps now, more than ever, we need Armando Iannucci. The filmmaker has always managed to perfectly skewer the world of politics from “The Thick Of It” to “In The Loop” to “Veep” to the upcoming “The Death Of Stalin.” However, in the era of Donald Trump, Iannucci believes that the President himself is creating material that is so bizarre, that it bests the finest efforts of comedy writers.

Continue reading Armando Iannucci Reveals More Details About His “Space Tourism” HBO Series ‘Avenue 5’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

FilmNation Backs Armando Iannucci’s David Copperfield Movie

FilmNation Entertainment is backing Armando Iannucci‘s “The Personal History of David Copperfield,” and will launch sales at the European Film Market this month.

The project is based on the novel by Charles Dickens and will offer a modern take on the title character as he navigates a chaotic world to find his elusive place within it. The original “David Copperfield” was first published in 1850 and describes the journey of the titular protagonist — who was modeled after Dickens himself, from impoverished childhood to becoming a successful author, thanks to perseverance and despite a lack of personal discipline.

Kevin Loader and Iannucci will produce the feature, which was developed with FilmNation. Iannucci, the creator of “Veep,” unveiled the title in October. He is directing from a script he wrote with Simon Blackwell. Iannucci and Blackwell collaborated with Tony Roche and Jesse Armstrong on the script for “In the Loop,” which received an Academy Award nomination.

Principal casting
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Russia bans The Death of Stalin

This probably won’t come as too much of a surprise, but Russia has decided to ban the release of The Death of Stalin, the latest movie from The Thick of It and Veep creator Armando Iannucci.

The satirical comedy, based upon the graphic novel of the same name, explores the Soviet power struggle following the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.

The film had come under fire from a number of Russian media figures for parodying the history of the country, and now the Russian culture ministry has announced that it has pulled the movie from a limited theatrical release on the grounds that it contains “information whose distribution is legally banned in Russia.”

See Also: Read our review of The Death of Stalin here

Director Iannucci posted the following comment to Twitter:

We still remain hopeful. I’ll keep you all posted x https://t.co/Kj16zAKgQM
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Russia Bans Dark Comedy ‘The Death of Stalin’

Russia Bans Dark Comedy ‘The Death of Stalin’
Russia has banned “The Death of Stalin” from being shown in cinemas after officials claimed the dark comedy was offensive.

A Russian culture ministry spokeswoman said the film is being pulled for containing “information whose distribution is legally banned in Russia,” according to Agency France-Presse.

The political satire was previously set for a limited release in theaters.

“The Death of Stalin” depicts Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin’s final days and the chaos that ensues following his death. The recently released trailer features scenes with Nikita Khrushchev, played by Steve Buscemi, discussing funeral arrangements and Stalin’s committee figuring out how to run the country.

The film is directed and co-written by “Veep” creator Armando Iannucci, who also wrote political sitcom “The Thick of It.” Rupert Friend, Andrea Riseborough, and Jeffrey Tambor also star in “The Death of Stalin.”

Iannucci tweeted his optimism about the film’s potential for release despite the ban. “We still remain hopeful.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Succession’ Trailer: HBO’s New Drama Fights For Corporate Power

Writer Jesse Armstrong (“Peep Show”, “The Thick of It”) returns to TV with the HBO series “Succession.” The series, produced by Adam McKay and Will Ferrell, will track the lives of the Roy family, successful owners of one of the biggest media and entertainment conglomerates in the world, as the patriarch decides to retain power, throwing everyone into disarray.

Continue reading ‘Succession’ Trailer: HBO’s New Drama Fights For Corporate Power at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

A Dictatorship Collapses in U.S. Trailer for Armando Iannucci’s ‘The Death of Stalin’

After successfully creating one of the funniest shows on television, Veep creator Armando Iannucci finally returned feature filmmaking with his In the Loop follow-up The Death of Stalin. Starring Steve Buscemi, Simon Russell Beale, Michael Palin, Paddy Considine, Rupert Friend, Jason Isaacs, Andrea Riseborough, and Jeffrey Tambor, it follows a political scramble for power after the, well, you know. Ahead of stopping by Sundance Film Festival, IFC Films have now released the full trailer.

“Armando Iannucci doesn’t make movies and TV about politics. He certainly features politicians and their endless petty squabbling and power struggles, but that’s adjacent to (though obviously entangled with) the real work of political organizing,” Dan Schindel said in our review. “Most notably, essentially all of the characters in the likes of The Thick of It, Veep, In the Loop, and now The Death of Stalin are politicians, but I honestly couldn’t tell
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Back': How the 'Peep Show' Creators Followed Up Their Cult Britcom

'Back': How the 'Peep Show' Creators Followed Up Their Cult Britcom
What do you do when the series that you've worked on for more than a decade – one that's attained cult status, spawned BuzzFeed listicles and earned you famous fans on both sides of the Atlantic – has finally come to an end? For David Mitchell and Robert Webb, the stars of the beloved Britcom Peep Show, which ran on the U.K.'s Channel 4 from 2003 to 2015, the answer was obvious: Get to work on another series.

"We were sort of staring into the abyss of a post Peep Show world,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Review: A Bad Moms Christmas (2017)

Christmas is upon us and with every approaching Christmas season, audiences can expect a seasonally themed comedy (or two) to crop up in November/December. This year, in addition to the Daddy’s Home 2 joy, we have a festive sequel to Jon Lucas and Scott Moore’s fine Comedy hit Bad Moms. Unfortunately it seems that A Bad Moms Christmas makes the fundamental error of not actually having many (or arguably any) jokes on show.

The concept is very by the books for festive family fracas fare and sees the three bad matriarchs from the last film – Amy (Mila Kunis), Carla (Kathryn Hahn) and Kiki (Kristen Bell) – prepare for the big show for mums (sorry, ‘moms’)…Christmas. But their job of taking all the stress of the holidays and styling it out will be made even worse this year, as their own mothers – Ruth (Christine Baranski), Sandy (Cheryl Hines) and
See full article at The Cultural Post »

'Back' Creator Simon Blackwell on Why He's Glad He Ditched Political Satire (Clue: Trump and Brexit)

Thanks to Veep, its even-swearier Brit predecessor The Thick of It and the foul-mouthed feature-length spinoff In The Loop, Simon Blackwell’s comedic pen has been behind arguably the past decade’s most celebrated (and award-amassing) U.K. political satire.

Alongside his collaborations with Armando Iannucci (the two are currently working together on a David Copperfield adaptation), the Oscar-nominated writer has also found the time to team with Chris Morris for Four Lions in 2010 and script several episodes of Peep Show, one of the U.K.'s most adored sitcoms that ran for nine seasons.

Now back in the U.K. (he left Veep in 2015...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Review: The Death of Stalin (2017)

Anybody who discusses satire in audio-visual media at some point must mention the work of Armando Iannucci. Creator of TV’s The Thick Of It and Veep, with credits that include The Day Today and Alan Partridge, his work is some of the finest in Comedy. And in 2009, Iannucci made his big screen full feature directorial debut with The Thick Of It spin-off In The Loop (one of the best comedies of our times) and now, Iannucci casts his eye to even darker – and even more volatile – political territory with The Death of Stalin.

As concepts go, this film has a pitch black core, as it not only delves into a figure whose actions have reverberated throughout socio-political history but in looking at the events surrounding his death in 1953 and the power struggles within the Soviet Union, it is a brazen era, to say the least, in which to set a Comedy.
See full article at The Cultural Post »

‘The Death Of Stalin’ Review: Dir. Armando Iannucci (2017)

The Death Of Stalin review: Armando Iannucci (The Thick Of It, Veep) directs his second film, a political comedy which doesn’t quite hit the mark.

The Death Of Stalin review by Orestes Adam.

Armando Iannucci is widely considered a master of political satire, most widely known for creating BBC’s The Thick of It and HBO’s Veep. This is exactly what makes his latest directorial feature, The Death of Stalin, such a disappointment. The film has the premise and talent of a comic masterpiece: the world’s leading political satirist taking on one of the darkest periods of the 20th century through the likes of Steve Buscemi and Jeffrey Tambor. Unfortunately, the choice to satirize Soviet politics from the perspective of the very murderers and rapists that comprised the political party leaves the viewer so tonally torn that it is, simply put, difficult to enjoy. While The Death of Stalin
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The Death of Stalin movie review: the great dictator

MaryAnn’s quick take… Audacious, outrageous, bleakly funny. Not since Charlie Chaplin sent up Hitler and invited us to laugh at terrible reality has there been a movie like this. I’m “biast” (pro): love Armando Iannucci’s work

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Presenting… Monty Python’s production of George Orwell’s 1984. Or damn close to it. So The Death of Stalin is akin to Terry Gilliam’s Brazil, then? Well, sort of. (I definitely scribbled “Brazil” in my notes while watching.) But Brazil was fiction; clearly inspired by actual totalitarian regimes, but entirely fictional. Stalin, however, is based on terrible reality. Perhaps not since Charlie Chaplin’s 1940 satire The Great Dictator has a filmmaker taken on such awful personalities and events and attempted to make us laugh about it all.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

The Death of Stalin review – more bleak than black

Armando Iannucci’s comic-book adaptation, about the aftermath of the despot’s death, is less caustic than his usual offerings

Known and loved for lacerating political satires The Thick of It, In the Loop and Veep, Armando Iannucci has a gift for skewering incompetent authority figures – locating the humour in their bumbling errors – as well as for truly creative, foul-mouthed insults. Iannucci and Soviet Russia: on paper, it’s a match made in heaven – both an opportunity to capitalise on anti-Russia sentiment and a chance to jab one of history’s most notorious autocrats in the ribs at a time when dictatorial, power-drunk figures are actually in power. A shame, then, that it doesn’t jab hard enough.

The film is adapted from Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin’s graphic novel, in which Stalin’s sudden death in 1953 serves as a catalyst for action, with neurotic acting general secretary Nikita
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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