3.7/10
1,842
67 user 8 critic

Cyber Seduction: His Secret Life (2005)

TV-14 | | Drama | TV Movie 20 June 2005
A high school kid (Sumpter) develops an addiction to Internet porn so intense that it begins to destroy his life and tear his family apart.

Director:

Tom McLoughlin

Writers:

Wesley Bishop (teleplay), Richard Kletter (teleplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeremy Sumpter ... Justin Petersen
Lyndsy Fonseca ... Amy
John Robinson ... Richard Peterson
Jake Scott Jake Scott ... Alex Peterson
Kyle Schmid ... Timmy
Nicole Dicker ... Monica
Kelly Lynch ... Diane Petersen
Briony Glassco ... Beth
Jennifer Wigmore Jennifer Wigmore
Michael Seater ... Nolan Mitchell
James A. Woods
Krysta Carter ... Sally Mizelle
David Nerman
Benz Antoine ... Coach Suha
Alison Sealy-Smith Alison Sealy-Smith
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Storyline

When popular high school sophomore swimming champion Justin Peterson becomes addicted to on-line pornography, the erotic images infest his mind and poison his life, destroying his relationship with his parents, his friends, and his girlfriend. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

One click can destroy a family. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Lifetime [United States]

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 June 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Addicted.com See more »

Filming Locations:

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although pornography addiction virtually always involves some form of masturbation or sexual activity, the film never even implies that the son is touching himself during his marathon viewing sessions; he simply looks at the photos. See more »

Goofs

Near the end of the movie where Justin goes to apologize to Amy, the shots of the front porch include a giant white sticker on the mailbox that reads "NO JUNK MAIL" - however, on the close-up shot, the sticker is missing from the mailbox. See more »

Quotes

Diane Petersen: It's garbage, Justin. I don't want it in my house.
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User Reviews

 
Lifetime's Appeal to Panic is Parodical and Misinforming
23 June 2005 | by sneedy-1See all my reviews

This is someone's worst nightmare, be it eagle-eyed fundamentalist authoritarian parents, their wide-eyed naive offspring living in the cyber-age OR the casual Lifetime movie viewer looking for an aggravation-free evening. Lifetime has often dared to tackle modern living via their dramatic mothers-at-arms approach to parenting; but this is almost obscurely misinforming, and capable only of instilling groundless fear in overcautious mothers. Nobody really wins, Lifetime can and has done much better (see 2003's "On Thin Ice). The presentation of Lifetime films has become quite formulaic and stagnant as of late: Yesterday's A-List celeb is mother to Tomorrow's up-and-coming rising star. Drama ensues.

This type of Made-For-TV event seems beneath us as we discover the broad and careless strokes made early on. This may have worked better as a novel, since the convoluted 'my the son the sexual deviant' storyline needn't be divulged all at once. As is, it's an over-hyped production that lacked any memorable performances. Director Tom McLoughin is rather accomplished at the helm on this project; he's worked on many projects in TV and film over the past 25 years, but not one of his projects leaves a lasting impression or is worthy of owning ("Friday the 13th Part VI", anyone?). He's a capable director, generally filming with unobstructed aplomb.

It's hard to believe any film solely about teenagers addicted to porn, but these are the same two 50-year-old men writing such turgid and stagnant Lifetime films as the 'teenage sex awareness' modern flit-pieces like 'She's Too Young'[2002] and 'Odd Girl Out' [2005]. As you could imagine, it plays out as bad as you'd expect; all we learn is that teenagers are drawn to the internet like moths to a flame whenever it concerns women dancing lasciviously. We see our protagonist become increasingly addicted to pornography; he eventually becomes ostracized from his peers (like all the young counterparts in Lifetime films), initiates his mother's new authoritarian parental regime and frequently makes his father (the stereotypical 'don't ask, don't tell' permissive Lifetime dad) uncomfortable. Occasionally the young person even considers suicide as an answer to his problems, most of which are rooted in puberty.

The cast dynamic is awkward at best; Kelly Lynch is so frayed she looks literally like she's only a flat-tire away from a nervous breakdown in the breakdown lane. It's pretty disconcerting to see her resorting to such puritanical parenthood ideals in her mid-forties after a career sustained previously by so many steamy bedroom scenes. I imagine there's the need to prove she's still a capable actress, but this is not her defining moment as an actress, nor a memorable performance; this is merely histrionics, much like you'd expect when puberty and menopause collide in the dark alleys of Suburbia. *+ / ****


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