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Elle Fanning In "Vogue"

Sneak Peek new images of actress Elle Fanning ("The Neon Demon") in the November 2018 issue of "Vogue" (Japan) magazine, wearing new fashions from the upcoming "Miu Miu" resort 2019 collection, photographed by Mert & Marcus:

The younger sister of actress Dakota Fanning, Elle made her film debut as the younger version of her sister's character in the drama "I Am Sam" (2001). 

As a child actress, she appeared in a string of films including "Because of Winn-Dixie" (2005), "Babel" (2006), "Phoebe in Wonderland" (2008) and Sofia Coppola's "Somewhere" (2010).

In 2011, Fanning starred in her breakout role as 'Alice Dainard' in J. J. Abrams' sci-fi-drama, "Super 8"...

...followed by leading roles in "We Bought a Zoo" (2011), "Ginger & Rosa" (2012) and "Maleficent" (2014).

She then made a transition into indie films including "3 Generations" (2015), "The Neon Demon" (2016), "The Beguiled" (2017), "Mary Shelley" (2018) and "Galveston".

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek "The Neon Demon"...
See full article at SneakPeek »

40 Actresses Over 40 Who Are Still Conquering Hollywood (Photos)

  • The Wrap
40 Actresses Over 40 Who Are Still Conquering Hollywood (Photos)
40 Actresses Over 40 Who Are Still Conquering Hollywood (Photos)

Amy Adams (1974)

Academy Award nominated Amy Adams, is best known for playing in Disney’s “Enchanted” and “American Hustle.” She most recently starred in Tom Ford’s “Nocturnal Animals.”

Cameron Diaz (1972)

Cameron Diaz first made her mark in Hollywood with films like “There’s Something About Mary” and “The Mask.” She most recently starred alongside Will Smith in “Annie.”

Cate Blanchett (1969)

This two time Academy Award winning actress is best known for her role in “The Aviator.” She has since starred in films like “The Lord of the Rings,” “Babel,” and “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” Blanchett is currently working on “Ocean’s Eight.”

Catherine Zeta-Jones (1969)

Catherine Zeta-Jones is best known for starring in “Intolerable Cruelty” and “Ocean’s Twelve.” She most recently starred in “Dad’s Army,” a British war comedy.

Famke Janssen (1964)

Famke Janssen is best known for playing
See full article at The Wrap »

No need to pick a ‘Favourite’: Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz could join long list of co-star Oscar nominees in Best Supporting Actress

No need to pick a ‘Favourite’: Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz could join long list of co-star Oscar nominees in Best Supporting Actress
Last season, Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson ended a 26-year Oscar drought by becoming the first co-stars to be nominated in Best Supporting Actor since “Bugsy” stars Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley. But one category that’s never been hurting for co-star nominees is Best Supporting Actress. A whopping 34 films have produced multiple nominees in the category, and it very well looks like we’ll hit 35 next year if “The Favourite” stars Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz make the cut.

Now that Fox Searchlight has solidified Stone’s and Weisz’s placements in supporting, and Olivia Colman‘s in lead, the former two are in fourth and fifth place in our Oscar odds, behind Regina King (“If Beale Street Could Talk”), Amy Adams (“Vice”) and Claire Foy (“First Man”). It would be the ninth time this century and the first time in seven years a pair of co-stars competed against each other.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Scores on Screen. The Natural Order of Things: Ryuichi Sakamoto and "The Revenant"

  • MUBI
Scores on Screen is a column by Clare Nina Norelli on film soundtracks.In Stephen Nomura Schible’s moving documentary Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda (2017), we are brought into the world of Ryuichi Sakamoto, an innovative Japanese composer responsible for not only a myriad of diverse compositional works, but also for the iconic scores of such films as Merry Christmas, Mr Lawrence (1983), The Last Emperor (1987), and Gohatto (1999). Shot over the course of five years, Coda allows us a glimpse at the composer at work, be it through traditional means as he notates by hand on manuscript at his Steinway grand piano, or in experimental mode, recording ambient sound in pursuit of complimentary timbres to include in his compositions. We watch as Sakamoto enthusiastically records the tranquil din of rain collecting in a bucket, the crunch of his boots meeting dry leaves on a forest floor, and the strained notes of a
See full article at MUBI »

Months of Meryl: Lions for Lambs (2007)

John and Matthew are watching every single live-action film starring Meryl Streep.

#38 — Janine Roth, a liberal network journalist faced with an ethical quandary.

John: When Meryl Streep accepted her Golden Globe for The Devil Wears Prada in January 2007, she divulged a prophecy: “This has been such a fun year to watch movies because of you gals,” she said, citing fellow nominees like Annette Bening, Toni Collette, and Beyoncé. “[It] makes you want to cry with gratitude… until next year.” How could Streep have known that her 2007 would contain some of the most insipid and unwatchable films of her entire career?

In Robert Redford’s Lions for Lambs, Streep switches sides from Rendition, her previous War on Terror drama, playing Janine Roth, an investigative journalist given an exclusive scoop by a hawkish, right-wing senator named Jasper Irving (Tom Cruise) about a new military tactic being deployed in Afghanistan. Because Lions for Lambs
See full article at FilmExperience »

Revisiting Hours: ‘Short Cuts,’ Altman and the Anti-‘Life Itself’

Every Friday, we’re recommending an older movie that’s worth seeing again through the lens of our current moment. We’re calling the series “Revisiting Hours” — consider this Rolling Stone’s unofficial film club. This week: Tim Grierson on Robert Altman’s 1993 celebrity-ensemble feel-bad masterpiece Short Cuts.

Because movies are a global art form, it’s natural that some filmmakers get interested in how stories connect us as human beings. (Yawn.) Much like life itself, which can sometimes be a medley of unrelated events that ultimately form a grand
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Dan Fogelman Defends ‘Life Itself’ Against Hilariously Bad Reviews

  • Variety
Dan Fogelman Defends ‘Life Itself’ Against Hilariously Bad Reviews
Critics of “Life Itself” have panned the film so swiftly and with such finality that director Dan Fogelman has felt the need to fight back.

“A couple of the early reviews that have come out about this movie feel so out of left field to everybody who’s a part of this movie,” Fogelman told TooFab. “There’s a disconnect between something that is happening between our primarily white male critics who don’t like anything that has any emotion.”

Despite Fogelman’s defense, several of the negative reviews have come from women — including IndieWire’s Kate Erbland, who calls it “an unholy combination of ‘Rashomon’ and ‘Babel,’ [which] strings together seemingly disparate plotlines into one massive, messy tableau of life itself, a life that zings toward the warm embrace of death.”

The critiques are especially crushing considering that Fogelman’s hit ABC series “This is Us” garnered eight Emmy nominations this year.
See full article at Variety »

Alfonso Cuaron’s ‘Roma’ Selected as Mexico’s Foreign-Language Oscar Submission

  • Variety
Alfonso Cuaron’s ‘Roma’ Selected as Mexico’s Foreign-Language Oscar Submission
Alfonso Cuaron’s family drama “Roma” has been selected by Mexico as the country’s foreign-language submission for the 91st Academy Awards.

Roma” is produced by Esperanto Filmoj and Participant Media. Netflix will debut “Roma” on its streaming service and distribute it theatrically worldwide on Dec. 14. Cuarón’s autobiographically inspired film — shot in black and white — is set in Mexico City and covers a year in the early ’70s as a middle-class family is quietly and unassumingly cared for by its beloved, live-in nanny and housekeeper (portrayed by Yalitza Aparicio).

Roma” is also considered a strong contender for a best picture nomination. In the past 20 years, foreign-language films “Life Is Beautiful,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” “Letters From Iwo Jima,” “Babel,” and “Amour” have been nominated for best picture. Five other foreign-language titles — “Grand Illusion,” “Z,” “The Emigrants,” “Cries and Whistpers,” and “The Postman” — have received Best Picture nods.

Roma” is
See full article at Variety »

‘Life Itself’ Review: Dan Fogelman’s Demented, Interconnected, and Morbid Epic Is Built on Bad Storytelling — Tiff

  • Indiewire
‘Life Itself’ Review: Dan Fogelman’s Demented, Interconnected, and Morbid Epic Is Built on Bad Storytelling — Tiff
“Life Itself” thinks you’re stupid. Or, if not stupid, unable to understand how a movie should work. It’s a movie made for people who can’t be trusted to understand any storytelling unless it’s not just spoon-fed but ladled on, piled high, and explained via montage and voiceover. It’s the kind of movie that includes commercials for itself by using its own title within the dialogue multiple times. Ostensibly, it’s about unreliable narration; if you don’t know what that is, “Life Itself” will explain it via monologue 10 minutes after delivering a ham-fisted demo of it in action. However, the movie uses unreliable narration as a way to pass off poor storytelling as a feature, not a bug.

But mostly, “Life Itself” is about death, with Fogelman co-opting the formula that made his television series “This Is Us” such a four-quadrant hit: twisty, twisted stories
See full article at Indiewire »

Close-Up On Elle Fanning

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek new images of actress Elle Fanning ("Galveston") in "Vanity Fair" magazine, wearing Valentino, Blumarine,  Gucci and a whole lot more:

The younger sister of actress Dakota Fanning, Elle made her film debut as the younger version of her sister's character in the drama "I Am Sam" (2001). As a child actress, she appeared in a string of films including "Because of Winn-Dixie" (2005), "Babel" (2006), "Phoebe in Wonderland" (2008) and Sofia Coppola's "Somewhere" (2010).

In 2011, Fanning starred in her breakout role as 'Alice Dainard' in J. J. Abrams' sci-fi-drama, "Super 8", followed by leading roles in "We Bought a Zoo" (2011), "Ginger & Rosa" (2012) and "Maleficent" (2014).

She then made a transition into indie films including "3 Generations" (2015), "The Neon Demon" (2016), "The Beguiled" (2017), "Mary Shelley" (2018) and "Galveston".

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek "Galveston"...
See full article at SneakPeek »

Venice: Luca Guadagnino's Conjures a "Suspiria" of His Own

  • MUBI
“How did it feel to dance Volk before the one who made it?” famed choreographer Madame Blanc asks new student Susie early into Luca Guadagnino’s spellbinding Suspiria. Madame Blanc (Tilda Swinton) has just watched Susie (Dakota Johnson) perform the piece that threw the Helena Markos Dance Company artistic director onto planetary fame. And Susie did not just excel at the task—she took the material to a whole new level. Watching Luca Guadagnino tackle Dario Argento’s genre classic 41 years later, the master-disciple exchange struck me as eerily fitting, as did the wide-eyed look in Swinton’s face—that terrifying moment she understands—as we do, with her—that the young ballerina has something no one else does.Comparisons between Argento’s original and Guadagnino’s take are likely to be at the cornerstone of the future discourse around Suspiria, but while such spot-the-differences exercises are vital, writing off
See full article at MUBI »

Telluride Film Festival: Alfonso Cuaron’s ‘Roma’ emerges as a likely Oscar nominee for Best Picture

Telluride Film Festival: Alfonso Cuaron’s ‘Roma’ emerges as a likely Oscar nominee for Best Picture
Only 10 times in history has a foreign-language film been nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars. The first: “Grand Illusion” in 1939. The last: “Amour” in 2012. That may be more than you figured, but here’s a stat that might be lower than you thought, given the prominent rise of Mexican filmmakers in recent years: Never, ever has a movie set primarily in Mexico or even spoken primarily in Spanish been nominated for the academy’s top prize. (Note: “Traffic” and “Babel” don’t count because “primarily” doesn’t apply.)

Now could Alfonso Cuaron‘s “Roma” be the one to break that south-of-the-border shutout with a Best Picture nomination?

You’d be hard-pressed to find anyone at the Telluride Film Festival this Labor Day weekend who wouldn’t sign off, not just on “could be,” but “will be.” Whether it actually wins is another matter, but virtually any case you could
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cate Blanchett Goes "Bazaar"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek new images of actress Cate Blanchett ("Thor: Ragnarok") in the September 2018 issue of "Harper's Bazaar" (Australia) magazine, wearing Giorgio Armani, lensed by Steven Chee:

Blanchett has won two 'Academy Awards', three 'Screen Actors Guild Awards', three 'Golden Globe Awards' and three 'BAFTA Awards', as well as appointed 'Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters' by the French government in 2012.

Blanchett first gained international attention as 'Elizabeth I of England' in director Shekhar Kapur's "Elizabeth" (1998), followed by her portrayal of 'Katharine Hepburn' in Martin Scorsese's "The Aviator" (2004). In 2013, she starred as 'Jasmine Francis' in "Blue Jasmine".

Blanchett's other notable films include "The Talented Mr. Ripley" (1999), Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy (2001–03) and "The Hobbit" trilogy (2012–14)...

...."Veronica Guerin" (2003), "Babel" (2006), "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008), "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" (2008) and "Thor: Ragnarok" (2017).

Click the
See full article at SneakPeek »

Will Michelle Yeoh wow Oscar voters in ‘Crazy Rich Asians’?

Will Michelle Yeoh wow Oscar voters in ‘Crazy Rich Asians’?
Audiences went coo-coo for “Crazy Rich Asians,” the first Hollywood-produced film with an all-Asian main cast since 1993’s “The Joy Luck Club.” The weekend’s No 1 film grossed $34 million in five days and has already made back its budget. Like its predecessor, it is based on a best-seller. It also is a rare romantic-comedy released by a major studio so far this year. Given the love it is getting from critics, it looks as it is not so crazy to think it could be a shoo-in contender in the Best Motion Picture Musical or Comedy category at the Golden Globes.

However, I am most curious about whether Oscar, which can be rather comedy averse, will warm to it. “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” a surprise 2003 blockbuster that also found humor in its central family’s ethnic quirks, could only manage a nomination for Nia Vardalos’ original screenplay. As for “Crazy Rich Asians,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Zahn McClarnon just became the ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Mvp, so nominate him for Drama Supporting Actor, Emmy voters!

Zahn McClarnon just became the ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Mvp, so nominate him for Drama Supporting Actor, Emmy voters!
Westworld” delivered what many are considering a series best episode Sunday night with the Ghost Nation-focused installment “Kiksuya” led by character actor Zahn McClarnon. Because McClarnon appears in at least five episodes of the show, he joins co-star Anthony Hopkins in the fiercely competitive Drama Supporting Actor race with a shot of earning an Emmy nomination. Can the critical buzz of an emotionally packed episode and the momentum of a looming season finale catapult McClarnon into Emmy history? It should!

SEEAnthony Hopkins (‘Westworld’) enters supporting Emmy race, but can he take down frontrunner David Harbour (‘Stranger Things’)?

To say that a nomination for McClarnon would be a breakthrough is an understatement. It would be nothing short of historic. Voters should already know McClarnon’s name from his turns on A&E’s “Longmire” as well as the critically acclaimed and Emmy-nominated second season of FX’s “Fargo,” but a nomination for
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Cannes Film Festival: Oscars be next for ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘BlacKkKlansman’?

2018 Cannes Film Festival: Oscars be next for ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘BlacKkKlansman’?
The Cannes Film Festival just wrapped up its 71st edition and the film with the biggest Oscar potential got a big boost at the closing ceremony. Spike Lee’s, “BlacKkKlansman,” the true story of an African-American cop who infiltrated the Kkk, took home the Grand Prix, the second highest prize of the festival. It was Lee’s first time competing on the Croisette since 1991 when “Jungle Fever” was in competition and was a bit of retribution for Lee after his widely acclaimed 1989 film, “Do the Right Thing,” received nothing from the jury.

If “BlacKkKlansman” were to get nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, it would be the second time a Grand Prix winner has gotten into the race for Oscar’s top honor. The first was “Life is Beautiful” in 1998. Thirteen past Grand Prix winners went on to earn 22 total Oscar nominations with five films scoring seven wins. Each
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tokyo Film Festival announces Koji Yakusho, Masaaki Yuasa retrospectives

Tokyo Film Festival announces Koji Yakusho, Masaaki Yuasa retrospectives
Japanese actor Yakusho’s work includes 1997 Palme d’Or winner The Eel.

This year’s Tokyo Inte­­­rnational Film Festival will be hosting retrospectives of the work of Japanese actor Koji Yakusho and animation director Masaaki Yuasa.

Tiff’s Japan Now section will screen a selection of Yakusho’s work, which spans Cannes Palme d’Or winner The Eel (1997); Eureka (2001), which received the prize of the Cannes Ecumenical Jury; and international productions such as Memoirs Of A Geisha (2005) and Babel (2007). He also recently starred in Hirokazu Kore-eda’s The Third Murder (2017). “Koji Yakusho is Japan’s leading international actor, demonstrating
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Tokyo Festival Sets Koji Yakusho Sidebar

  • Variety
Tokyo Festival Sets Koji Yakusho Sidebar
The Tokyo International Film Festival will dedicate a major sidebar section this year to the work of legendary actor Koji Yakusho. Another section will be dedicated to animation director Masaaki Yuasa.

“Over a 40-year career, Yakusho has won best actor awards at a variety of international film festivals, such as with “Cure” (1997) at the Tokyo festival, “Warm Water Under the Red Bridge” at the Chicago International Film Festival, “Walking My Life” at Film Madrid, “The Woodsman and the Rain” at the Dubai International Film Festival and “The World of Kanako” at the Sitges Festival. He has also starred in a remarkable number of other award-winning films: Cannes Palme d’Or-winning “The Eel,” “Eureka” and Alejandro Inarritu’s “Babel.”

Yuasa has been involved with popular franchises including “Doraemon,” “Chibi Maruko-chan” and “Crayon Shinchan.” More recently he has scored as a feature director. His “Lu Over the Wall” won the Cristal Award
See full article at Variety »

Sebastian Lelio’s ‘A Fantastic Woman’ Sweeps 5th Platino Awards

  • Variety
Sebastian Lelio’s ‘A Fantastic Woman’ Sweeps 5th Platino Awards
Riviera Maya, Mexico — As widely predicted, Sebastian Lelio’s “A Fantastic Woman” swept the 5th Platino Ibero-American Film Awards Sunday, held at the Xcaret Riviera Maya resort in Mexico.

This is the second time Lelio has snagged the best picture Platino Award. His poignant drama about a divorcee, “Gloria,” won at the inaugural edition of the four-year old annual event.

The Platino Awards sweep is another feather in the cap for Lelio who took home the foreign language Oscar for Chile this year for “A Fantastic Woman.”

“Those of us who make movies play with perception and reality; those who watch our films are responsible for making sense of it,” said Lelio upon receiving his best director prize.

In industry terms, Spain was a producer or very often co-producer of virtually all the winning projects, both TV and film.

The glittering event featured a bevy of actors from across Ibero-America
See full article at Variety »

Mexico’s ArteCaryes Film and Arts Festival Marries Cinema With Mother Nature

  • Variety
Nestled amidst a quiet, remote strip between Puerta Vallarta and Manzanillo on Jalisco, Mexico’s Pacific coast, Costa Careyes is a luxury resort paradise, lush with jungle and surf and bright, candy-colored casitas. Founded by Italian banker Gian Franco Brignone in 1968, Careyes has since become a coveted vacation spot for the elite traveler — Bill and Melinda Gates, Heidi Klum and Cindy Crawford have all been guests here — complete with a polo club, private villas and two oceanfront castles with moat-like infinity pools that blend in with the azure sky. With its bohemian flair and Mediterranean-esque architecture, the tropical hideaway is also home to ArteCareyes Film and Arts Festival, an annual gathering that celebrates film, photography, music and contemporary art from Latin America and around the world.

Entering its eighth year, the strictly invite-only event, running April 26-30, is not your typical film fest. Held in collaboration with the Careyes Foundation,
See full article at Variety »
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