6.8/10
161
8 user 18 critic

The Beauty Academy of Kabul (2004)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 4 May 2004 (USA)
A documentary following American women (some of whom emigrated from Afghanistan in the early 1980s) who return to the capital city of Kabul to open an American-style school for beauticians.... See full summary »

Director:

Liz Mermin

On Disc

at Amazon

1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Storyline

A documentary following American women (some of whom emigrated from Afghanistan in the early 1980s) who return to the capital city of Kabul to open an American-style school for beauticians. Some of their students are women who maintained "underground" beauty salons while the city was under strict Taliban control. Written by RBFS

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

BBC Four [UK]

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Persian

Release Date:

4 May 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

I akadimia omorfias tis Kabul See more »

Filming Locations:

Kabul, Afghanistan

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$9,704, 26 March 2006, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$225,348, 22 October 2006
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Magic Lantern Media Inc. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
slight but powerful

At only seventy-four minutes in length "The Beauty Academy of Kabul" doesn't stick around very long, but there is a palpable power in its brevity. The film follows several hair stylists from the United States, including an Afghan refugee, into post-Taliban Afghanistan, as they train local women in the art of hair and make-up. Amazingly, some of these students had run beauty shops while the country was under the thumb of the Taliban. The film is quite fascinating in its simplicity, as it presents a story about building bridges between cultures and introducing peace to a war torn country with something as basic as scissors and a make-up brush. It's unexpectedly affecting, and captures a sense of rekindling misplaced hope in the region.


3 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 8 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed