After the death of Princess Diana, Queen Elizabeth II struggles with her reaction to a sequence of events nobody could have predicted.

Director:

Stephen Frears

Writer:

Peter Morgan
Won 1 Oscar. Another 95 wins & 97 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Helen Mirren ... The Queen
James Cromwell ... Prince Philip
Alex Jennings ... Prince Charles
Roger Allam ... Robin Janvrin
Sylvia Syms ... Queen Mother
Tim McMullan ... Stephen Lamport
Robin Soans ... Equerry
Lola Peploe Lola Peploe ... Janvrin's Secretary
Douglas Reith ... Lord Airlie
Joyce Henderson Joyce Henderson ... Balmoral Maid
Pat Laffan ... Head Ghillie
Amanda Hadingue Amanda Hadingue ... Queen's Dresser
John McGlynn ... Balmoral Head Ghillie
Gray O'Brien ... Charles' Valet
Dolina MacLennan Dolina MacLennan ... Balmoral Switchboard Operator
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Storyline

Diana, the "People's Princess" has died in a car accident in Paris. The Queen (Dame Helen Mirren) and her family decide that for the best, they should remain hidden behind the closed doors of Balmoral Castle. The heartbroken public do not understand and request that the Queen comforts her people. This also puts pressure on newly elected Tony Blair (Michael Sheen), who constantly tries to convince the monarchy to address the public. Written by Film_Fan

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Lifetime of Tradition. A World of Change. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The only Best Picture Oscar nominee that year to be also nominated for Best Costume Design. See more »

Goofs

When the Queen and Prince Charles are set for a drive, Queen Elizabeth is wearing her glasses as she puts the Rover in gear and drives off. Cut to a different angle (from the front of the Rover) and her glasses are nowhere in sight. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Reporter: After weeks of campaigning on the road, Tony Blair and his family finally strolled the few hundred yards to the polling station this election day morning. Amongst the Labour faithful up and down the country, there is an enormous sense of pride in Mr. Blair's achievements, and the confidence that he is about to become the youngest prime minister this century.
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Connections

Features GMTV (1993) See more »

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Written by Tom Blades (as Blades)
Performed by and Licensed Courtesy of Tom Blades
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User Reviews

 
Betty Windsor as we have never seen her before ...
26 September 2006 | by MOscarbradleySee all my reviews

There is no way of knowing, of course, just how authentic is Peter Morgan's very fine script for this account of what may or may not have taken place in the household of HRH during the days, chiefly between the death of Diana, Princess of Wales and her funeral, as it is unlikely that those involved would have blurted out to Morgan what they probably consider to be state secrets. No, Morgan's script is pure conjecture, a fiction about real events lent a considerable degree of seeming 'authenticity' by director Stephen Frears handling of the material and use of documentary footage mainly taken from the television programmes of the day. Should we condemn him, then, for guessing what conversations may have occurred in private between the Queen and her Prime Minister? Certainly not, anymore than we should condemn James Goldman for being fanciful as to what may or may not have occurred in the Court of Henry 11 and Eleanor of Aquitaine.

"The Queen", then, is not some purposeful account of the facts surrounding the death of Princess Diana as seen from the Royal, (and Prime Ministerial), perspective as a wonderfully human comedy hewn from a national and a private tragedy. And at it's heart, and what really makes it work, is a devastatingly accurate study, not simply of a Monarch we all feel we 'know' from endless television footage, but of a deeply private woman struggling to maintain her own personal dignity in the midst of immense public scrutiny, and Helen Mirren's performance is really quite extraordinary. She has the looks and the mannerisms off pat but more significantly she cuts to the quick of the private individual and unearths the human being inside the Queen. This is great acting which I have no doubt will be rewarded with every prize going come the year's end, (and anyone unfamiliar with Mirren's work who thinks, perhaps, that this is largely just a brilliant piece of mimicry should seek out her very different but equally brilliant performance on television as the present Queen's namesake Elizabeth 1).

The biggest glittering prize most likely to come Mirren's way is, of course, the Oscar and amid the ballyhoo surrounding her performance, Michael Sheen's brilliant turn as Tony Blair has been mostly overlooked. Sheen, too, gives an award-worthy turn as our present Prime Minister, again capturing, not just the look and the mannerisms, but also the arrogance that comes with youth and success and, more importantly, the humility that finally comes with understanding. Sheen gets closer to the 'real' Blair in those moments when he isn't saying anything at all.

Neither Alex Jennings nor James Cromwell look anything Princes Charles and Philip but they manage to capture the essence of the men. (Jennings is particularly good at getting that vacant look of Charles' that says to many people, 'Is there anyone at home?'). And there's a lovely, beautifully understated performance by Roger Allam as the Queen's Private Secretary.

Of course, it is almost as unlikely we will ever know what the people portrayed in the film think of it as it is we will ever know how close Mirren has come to 'getting it right' but I defy anyone to condemn the film on the grounds of either taste or accuracy. What matters isn't how real this film is, (it isn't a documentary, after all), but how closely those involved have come to capturing the hearts and minds of the people on the screen. Judged on this basis, "The Queen" is an unqualified triumph.


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Details

Country:

UK | USA | France | Italy

Language:

English | German | French

Release Date:

17 November 2006 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Queen See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP9,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$122,014, 1 October 2006

Gross USA:

$56,441,711

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$123,384,128
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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