7.5/10
17,850
121 user 159 critic

The Namesake (2006)

PG-13 | | Drama | 6 April 2007 (USA)
Trailer
2:30 | Trailer

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ON DISC
American-born Gogol, the son of Indian immigrants, wants to fit in among his fellow New Yorkers, despite his family's unwillingness to let go of their traditional ways.

Director:

Mira Nair

Writers:

Sooni Taraporevala (screenplay), Jhumpa Lahiri (novel)
4 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Kal Penn ... Nikhil a.k.a. Gogol
Tabu ... Ashima
Irrfan Khan ... Ashoke
Jacinda Barrett ... Maxine
Zuleikha Robinson ... Moushumi Mazumdar
Brooke Smith ... Sally
Sahira Nair Sahira Nair ... Sonia
Jagannath Guha Jagannath Guha ... Ghosh
Ruma Guha Thakurta ... Ashoke's Mother
Sandip Deb Sandip Deb ... Music Teacher
Sukanya ... Rini
Tanushree Shankar Tanushree Shankar ... Ashima's Mother
Sabyasachi Chakraborty ... Ashima's Father
Tamal Ray Chowdhury Tamal Ray Chowdhury ... Ashoke's Father
Dhruv Mookerji Dhruv Mookerji ... Rana
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Storyline

While traveling by train to visit his grandfather in Jamshedpur, Calcutta born, Bengali-speaking Ashoke Ganguli meets with fellow-traveler, Ghosh, who impresses upon him to travel, while Ashoke is deep into a book authored by Nicholai Gogol. The train meets with an accident, and after recuperating, Ashoke re-locates to America, settles down, returns home in 1977 to get married to aspiring singer, Ashima, and returns home to New York. Shortly thereafter they become parents of a boy, who they initially name Gogol, and a few years later both give birth to Sonia. The family then buy their own house in the suburbs and travel to India for the first time after their marriage. The second time they travel to India is when Gogol and Sonia are in their late teens, and after a memorable visit to Kolkata and then to the Taj Mahal, they return home. Gogol falls in love with Maxine Ratliff and moves in with her family, while Ashoke spends time traveling, and Sonia moves to California, leaving Ashima... Written by rAjOo (gunwanti@hotmail.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Two Worlds. One Journey. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexuality/nudity, a scene of drug use, some disturbing images and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA | India

Language:

English | Hindi | Bengali | French

Release Date:

6 April 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El buen nombre See more »

Filming Locations:

Calcutta, West Bengal, India See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$248,552, 11 March 2007

Gross USA:

$8,661,334

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,100,761
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kate Hudson and Natalie Portman were considered for the part of Maxine. See more »

Goofs

When Ashima is returning home after singing class, there are blue public buses on the over-bridge. Public buses in Calcutta were unpainted in 1977. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Man: Mm, what are you reading?
Ashoke Ganguli: Hm? "The Overcoat", by Gogol.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The first end credit is 'For our parents who gave us everything' and names of presumably the cast & crews' parents appear before the cast list. See more »


Soundtracks

Raag Mishra Mel Ki Malhar
Traditional
Performed by Bismillah Khan
Courtesy of Music Today
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User Reviews

 
A very well-shot, vibrant film that captures the nuances of Bengali culture, as well as the loneliness universally felt by all persons.
7 January 2007 | by dashing-snigdhaSee all my reviews

As a fellow Bengali and Jhumpa Lahiri fan, I had low expectations for a movie adaptation of her poignant novel (though I think The Interpreter of Maladies was better written). However, I was pleasantly surprised when I finally saw the movie at today's NY Times Arts and Leisure Weekend screening. The movie addresses all issues with care, and makes a non-Bengali audience understand the nuances of Bengali culture. The movie captures the hustle and bustle of India, sets the tone of the movie from the very first scene, and, overall, is heartwarming and true. It is humorous at all the right points, and the transition from a loud, vibrant and colorful life to a lonely, cold, and snow-white New York is breathtaking. You can feel Tabu's (Ashima's) loneliness. Jhumpa Lahiri's cameo is well-appreciated, though many in the audience did not catch it. The movie is respectful of Indian culture and uses small instances as canvases for large messages. Everyone is well-cast. Kal Penn shows himself to be capable of more difficult roles than the college-boy stereotype. Tabu and Irrfan Khan do not disappoint, since they are some of the highest-esteemed actors in India today. I felt like going back to Calcutta during all the Indian scenes. Starting the opening credits with the characters of the actors' names replaced with American characters was witty. "Everyday has been a gift, Gogol," Irrfan Khan (Ashok) tells Kal Penn (Gogol) in the movie, but truly, The Namesake is a wonderful gift for its audience, especially since I saw this movie 5 days before my birthday.


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