6.5/10
3,447
45 user 16 critic

Land of the Blind (2006)

Trailer
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ON DISC
A soldier recounts his relationship with a famous political prisoner attempting to overthrow their country's authoritarian government.

Director:

Robert Edwards

Writer:

Robert Edwards
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ralph Fiennes ... Joe
Donald Sutherland ... Thorne
Tom Hollander ... Maximilian II
Lara Flynn Boyle ... First Lady
Marc Warren ... Pool
Ron Cook ... Doc
Robert Daws ... Jones
Laura Fraser ... Madeleine
Jonathan Hyde ... Smith
Camilla Rutherford ... Tania
Don Warrington ... First Sergeant
Miranda Raison ... Daisy
Nigel Whitmey Nigel Whitmey ... Anchorman
Leigh Zimmerman ... Anchorwoman
Mackenzie Crook ... Editor
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Storyline

A political drama about terrorism, revolution, and the power of memory. In an unnamed place and time, an idealistic soldier named Joe strikes up an illicit friendship with a political prisoner named Thorne, who eventually recruits him into a bloody coup d'etat. But in the post-revolutionary world, what Thorne asks of Joe leads the two men into bitter conflict, spiraling downward into madness until Joe's co-conspirators conclude that they must erase him from history. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and some sexual content/nudity | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official soundtrack site

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 October 2007 (Portugal) See more »

Also Known As:

Confesión bajo juramento See more »

Filming Locations:

UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,244, 16 June 2006, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$5,244, 18 June 2006
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie contains several references to many real life revolutions and dictators: women wearing veils covering them from head to toe after the revolution (Iran), calling each other "citizen" (France); the gray uniform Thorne wears that resembles Stalin's (Russia) and Mao Zedong's (China); the First Lady's ludicrous wardrobe just like Ferdinand Marcos' wife (Phillipines) or dictatorial power being inherited from father to son (Haiti). Also, Thorne's beard looks similar to Marx's, and the "re-education" camp maybe a reference to Russian gulags. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Anchorwoman: So many fond memories of Maximilian the First on the tenth anniversary of our glorious leader's death.
Anchorman: Many of course doubted that his son and heir, Maximilian II, could live up to the example of his charismatic father. But the man affectionately called Junior has valiantly continued against the pesky rebellion, led by the playwright turned terrorist, John Thorne.
Anchorwoman: Once derided as the playboy Prince more interested in the movie business, the President-for-life announced today that ...
[...]
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Connections

References Planet of the Apes (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

Ave Maria
Written by Franz Schubert
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User Reviews

 
Captivating yet Disturbing View of Power
28 December 2006 | by dballredSee all my reviews

I have always had a certain fascination for stories which indict the abuse of power in the name of the state. After I saw this film the first time, I couldn't stop thinking about it. It had all the disturbing characteristics of an Orwellian novel, but it was not as relentlessly depressing. I believe the screenwriter was holding out the hope that the people will "get" the story.

In this film, a mythical country is beset by an endless array of despots. These despots show character traits mankind has witnessed in real life, such as Pol Pot, Mussolini, Louis XVI/Marie Antoinette, Peron, Ayatollah Khoumeni, and Kim Jong Il. In this "land of the blind," the people are more interested in popular culture than the suffering of mankind at the hands of the despots. As a result, they elect movie stars to represent them in what becomes clear as a sham system.

Those people who are politically motivated and want to see a parallel between the nasty people who are leading the poor nation in the story to ruin and the current world leaders are, in my opinion, completely missing the point. In the first place, the title of this film should provide a clue. In a "land of the blind," just about anybody could arise to a position of power because the "blind" are too easily led.

In this film, there is a heavy reliance on imagery and metaphor. The main repetitive image is that of an elephant. In the movie, the parable of the blind men and the elephant is brought out and that, in my opinion, is what this film is all about. New governments can provide their side of the story--the elephant--to the blind public by steering them to the desired part of the anatomy.

Donald Sutherland, playing a character aptly named Thorn, is one of the best casting choices ever made. You'll need to see this film to understand what I'm talking about. I gave this a nine rating out of ten.


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