7.4/10
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3 user

Fooling Hitler (2004)

The true story of the greatest deception of WW2: one which helped change the course of the war itself.

Director:

Philip Smith

Writer:

Philip Smith
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jason Durr ... Lt. Col. Strangeways
Howard Attfield Howard Attfield ... Col. Turner
Grant Burgin ... Sergeant Granger
Dorian Healy ... Major Barkus
Coral Beed ... Lady Elizabeth Clemens
Peter Pacey ... Dennis Wheatley
Nigel Williams Nigel Williams ... Brigadier Boyson
Roger Barclay ... Major T.A. Robertson
Peter Wickham Peter Wickham ... General Mansfield
Matt Canavan Matt Canavan ... Private Williams
Kieron Jecchinis ... Vicar (as Kieron Jecchins)
Jeff Harding ... General Stimson
Richard Lintern ... Col. Bevan
Richard Cotton ... Douglas Fairbanks Junior (as Richard Wills-Cotton)
Daniel Hart Daniel Hart ... Corporal Collins
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Storyline

This film tells the true story of how a bunch of writers, artists, set designers and back room technicians pooled their talents in order to outwit the German High Command and fool Hitler. Espionage, counter espionage, decoy airfields, inflatable tanks, guns and soldiers are all deployed in the run up to D Day to create a massive diversion and the strongest possible indication that the landings will be in Calais rather than Normandy. A whole invisible army is conjured up: FUSAG the First US Army Group. General Patton is placed in charge of this army, such is its importance he is detained in Britain for several weeks after the Normandy landing in order to (successfully) convince Hitler that a second and larger set of landings will be staged in Calais. A true story. Written by Philip Smith

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Taglines:

The true story of the greatest deception of world War Two

Genres:

History | War

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Did You Know?

Goofs

At the film studio Col. Strangeways is introduced to a serviceman who stands up and salutes him. The man is not wearing headgear. British serviceman only ever salute when wearing headgear. See more »

User Reviews

 
An enjoyable if abridged tale
4 May 2009 | by colfromkirkSee all my reviews

This was a very enjoyable story of the methods of deception used by the allies against the Germans in WWII. It was more drama than documentary and much of the detail especially about the gadgets issued to spy's and agents was omitted (other than the rat), as well as the way these agents worked. However the main gist of this secret work was described along with the struggle by those carrying out this work to be taken seriously.

Acting was adequate but the special effects and CG generated A/C had some errors. Historical accuracy was reasonable but shallow and dumbed down. The RAF Dambuster squadron was mentioned, but not its actual number for instance.

On the whole a reasonable attempt to describe a lesser known aspect of WWII to those who would probably never watch a regular documentary in a month of Sundays.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 October 2004 (UK) See more »

Filming Locations:

England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,200,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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