7.6/10
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2,190 user 468 critic

300 (2006)

R | | Action, Drama | 9 March 2007 (USA)
Trailer
3:06 | Trailer
King Leonidas of Sparta and a force of 300 men fight the Persians at Thermopylae in 480 B.C.

Director:

Zack Snyder

Writers:

Zack Snyder (screenplay), Kurt Johnstad (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Popularity
429 ( 207)
17 wins & 45 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gerard Butler ... King Leonidas
Lena Headey ... Queen Gorgo
Dominic West ... Theron
David Wenham ... Dilios
Vincent Regan ... Captain
Michael Fassbender ... Stelios
Tom Wisdom ... Astinos
Andrew Pleavin ... Daxos
Andrew Tiernan ... Ephialtes
Rodrigo Santoro ... Xerxes
Giovani Cimmino ... Pleistarchos (as Giovani Antonio Cimmino)
Stephen McHattie ... Loyalist
Greg Kramer ... Ephor #1
Alex Ivanovici ... Ephor #2
Kelly Craig ... Oracle Girl
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Storyline

In the Battle of Thermopylae of 480 BC an alliance of Greek city-states fought the invading Persian army in the mountain pass of Thermopylae. Vastly outnumbered, the Greeks held back the enemy in one of the most famous last stands of history. Persian King Xerxes led a Army of well over 100,000 (Persian king Xerxes before war has about 170,000 army) men to Greece and was confronted by 300 Spartans, 700 Thespians, and 400 Thebans. Xerxes waited for 10 days for King Leonidas to surrender or withdraw but left with no options he pushed forward. After 3 days of battle all the Greeks were killed. The Spartan defeat was not the one expected, as a local shepherd, named Ephialtes, defected to the Persians and informed Xerxes that the separate path through Thermopylae, which the Persians could use to outflank the Greeks, was not as heavily guarded as they thought. Written by cyberian2005

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Based on Frank Miller's Graphic Novel See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for graphic battle sequences throughout, some sexuality and nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Battle of Thermopylae is often taught to military strategists as an example of the advantages of training, equipment, and good use of terrain as force multipliers. See more »

Goofs

Spartan women wore an ancient and simpler design of peplos that completely bared a thigh. However, Spartan women in the film are seen wearing non-Lacedaemonian clothing, even anachronistic tank tops. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dilios: When the boy was born, like all Spartans, he was inspected.
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Crazy Credits

The opening Warner Bros., Legendary Pictures and Virtual Studios logos are made of stone and appear in front of a brown, cloudy sky. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Movie Queens (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

To Victory
Composed by Tyler Bates
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User Reviews

Thrilling blood-fest
30 March 2007 | by rogerdarlingtonSee all my reviews

The 480 BC Battle of Thermopylae is the stuff of military legend when, in popular lore, a mere 300 Spartans commanded by King Leonidas held off a Persian force led by Xerxes the Great that Herodotus claimed as 2.6 million. In truth, the Spartans were backed by a mixed force of almost 7,000, while there are enormous variations in modern estimates of the multi-ethnic Persian army, but somewhere between 100,000-200,000 seems realistic. Whatever the actual figures, the odds against the Spartans were terrible, death was inevitable, and their honour secure.

The story was first told on film in 1962 when director Rudolph Maté went to Greece and shot a worthy, but conventional and surprisingly leaden, version entitled "The 300 Spartans", starring American Richard Egan as King Leonidas and the British David Farrar as Xerxes. "300" takes the same basic narrative and presents it in an utterly different style in a blood-fest when "The Wild Bunch" meets "Kill Bill" and the visuals are like nothing except "Sin City". This time the director is Zack Snyder, known for his music videos, and the location is a studio set in Montreal with green backgrounds later filled by superb computer-generated graphics and the whole storybook style is based on the graphic novel by co-producer Frank Miller. Both versions use the legendary exchange: "When we attack today, our arrows will blot out the sun!" "Good; then we will fight in the shade." But only "300" has such fun lines as: "Spartans! Enjoy your breakfast, for tonight we dine in Hell!"

Ever since its first public showing at the Berlin Film Festival, most critics have mauled "300" and it presents an easy target for those wanting something more cerebral: there is virtually no plot or characterisation, the script is sparse and bland, much of the acting is exaggerated and over-loud, when it is not homo-erotic it is oddly camp, and the whole thing is stereotypical when it is not outright xenophobic and politically incorrect. And yet, as entertainment, it has much to offer: the sepia-tinged visuals are absolutely stunning and the fight sequences viscerally exciting. I was fortunate enough to see it in IMAX and I regularly felt blood-splattered and exhausted and quite ready to leap into the action.

There are no big names in the cast list which helps the sense of history but does not raise the thespian talent quotient. Gerard Butler plays King Leonidas with a Scottish accent, while the Brazilian Rodrigo Santoro is a version of Xerxes bejewelled with ethnic metalwork. Most of the warriors are literally larger than life: the actors playing the Spartans reveal most of their bodies with digitally-enhanced muscles, while on Xerxes' side characters include a huge hunchback, a giant emissary and a claw-armed executioner as well the metal-masked Immortals. This is before we get on to an enormous raging rhino and bedecked elephants. Truly this is a battle with a circus-like cast. The love interest comes from the feisty wife of Leonidas, Queen Gorgo, portrayed by the alluring British actress Lena Headey. There is even a scene in a rippling corn field borrowed from "Gladiator".

At the end of the day, what makes the movie are the thrilling fight sequences with encounters in which the film is slowed down and then speeded up to give a video-game quality that is unlike anything you have previously seen on the big screen. Whem a sword slashes or a spear lungs or an arrow whistles, you really feel and hear it. At times, it is as if a picture by Hieronymus Bosch had come to life.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA | Canada | Bulgaria | Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 March 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

300: The IMAX Experience See more »

Filming Locations:

Montréal, Québec, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$65,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$70,885,301, 11 March 2007

Gross USA:

$210,614,939

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$456,068,181
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Sonics-DDP (IMAX version)| DTS | SDDS | Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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