6.8/10
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108 user 121 critic

Martian Child (2007)

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A science-fiction writer, recently widowed, considers whether to adopt a hyper-imaginative 6-year-old abandoned and socially rejected boy who says he's really from Mars.

Director:

Menno Meyjes

Writers:

Seth Bass (screenplay) (as Seth E. Bass), Jonathan Tolins (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Cusack ... David
Bobby Coleman ... Dennis
Amanda Peet ... Harlee
Sophie Okonedo ... Sophie
Joan Cusack ... Liz
Oliver Platt ... Jeff
Bud Bud ... Somewhere / Flomar
Richard Schiff ... Lefkowitz
Taya Calicetto Taya Calicetto ... Esther
David Kaye ... Andy
Braxton Bonneville Braxton Bonneville ... Nicholas
Samuel Charles Samuel Charles ... Jonas
Zak Ludwig ... Young David
Samuel Patrick Chu ... Boy at Group Home
Ryan Morrissette Ryan Morrissette ... Boy at Group Home
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Storyline

What's the nature of being a parent and of being a child? David is a widower grieving for two years. He writes science fiction and was considered weird as a boy. He meets Dennis, a foster child who claims to be on a mission from Mars, stays in a large box all day, fears sunlight, and wears a belt of flashlight batteries so he won't float away. David takes the six-year-old home on a trial. His sister and his wife's best friend offer support, but the guys are basically alone to figure this out. Dennis takes things, is expelled, and is coached by David in being normal. Will the court approve the adoption, and will Dennis stay? Can a man become a father and a child become a son? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The story of a man becoming a father...and a boy becoming a son. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Family

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic elements and mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 November 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Un niño de otro mundo See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$27,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,376,669, 4 November 2007, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$7,486,906, 9 December 2007
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Jerry Zucker was brought in to shoot new footage, according to Patrick Goldstein in the Los Angeles Times on 10 August 2007. See more »

Goofs

When David is leaving the media event for his new book, the name of the gallery - Elliott Louis Gallery - is visible. This is an art gallery in Vancouver, Canada. See more »

Quotes

David: Uh, listen, Chief, I, uh... I brought you some sunblock. Very strong stuff. SPF 45, that's sun protection factor, and uh, helps you against the ultraviolet rays, which are, you know, they call them the UV rays. Anyways, it's hypoallergenic and waterproof. I'll just leave it for you.
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Connections

References The Omen (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Multiply
Written by Jamie Lidell (as Jamie Lidderdale) and Mocky (as Dominic Salole)
Performed by Jamie Lidell
Courtesy of Warp Records Limited
By Arrangement with Zync Music Inc.
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User Reviews

 
Not Like Everyone Else
12 November 2007 | by jon.h.ochiaiSee all my reviews

While walking with his sister Liz (Joan Cusack) in the park, widower David Gordon (John Cusack) confesses, "I just want my life to have meaning..." I think what David really is talking about is a personal legacy. David is considering adopting Dennis (Bobby Coleman), a strange little boy who spends his days in card board box with cut out holes. Oh yes, and Dennis believes he is from Mars. He is here on earth to study "human being-ness". This is the conceit of Director Menno Meyjes's "Martian Child". The screenplay by Seth Bass and Jonathan Tolins is based on the novel by David Gerrold. "Martian Child" really flew under the movie radar. I had heard about it earlier in the year, and got the gist of the story. Being a fan of John Cusack and Amanda Peete, I was curious to see the "Martian Child". More curious was the lack of fan fare or promotion associated with the movie. "Martian Child" plays much like an independent film, except for its talented named cast. "Martian Child" is reminiscent of "K-Pax" with Jeff Bridges and Kevin Spacey. Where "K-Pax" crumbled despite noble intentions with its horrendously ambiguous ending, "Martian Child" has a distinct conclusion without the pretense or ambition. "Martian Child" is not a great movie. However, for what it is—it is satisfying. Meyjes's "Martian Child" is a sentimental tear jerker that is so very earnest and sweet. John Cusack is amazing.

John Cusack plays David Gordon, a successful science fiction writer. His best selling book is in production as a big budget Hollywood movie. David's agent Jeff (neurotic Oliver Platt) desperately pleads with David to finish his book sequel draft. Their publisher Mimi (Anjelica Huston) anxiously awaits the draft, so she can throw a coming out party in 6 weeks. That is a little wacky. David's wife and the love of his life died two years ago, and since then much of his life is on hold. He lives in a great home with his dog, Somewhere. David's best friend is the beautiful and radiant Harlee (Amanda Peete)—his wife's sister. This makes for a dicey storyline, given the way things usually evolve in these situations. Amanda Peete is great here. She has a naturalness and ease.

David gets a call from his social worker friend Sophie (Sophie Okonedo). Obviously David has reservations about a boy in a box who thinks he's from Mars. Sophie reassures, "You write about Mars." Thus, the experiment begins. David brings Dennis to his home on a trial basis. Dennis wears sun block and sunglasses to counteract being on a planet closer to the sun than Mars. He also wears a weight belt so as not to float away. And Dennis only eats Lucky Charms—which are magically delicious.

David struggles his way through, and begins to really see Dennis. Dennis reminds him of his younger outsider self. David also starts wondering whether Dennis is really who he says he is following meaningful coincidences at a Cubs baseball game, and Dennis's apparent ability to taste color. This seems like a clumsy narrative device.

What eventually wins over "Martian Child" is the brilliant chemistry between John Cusack and Bobby Coleman. There is an inspired moment when Dennis and David gaze above at the stars. Coleman as Dennis embodies the right awkwardness and innocence. He touchingly asks David "Is it good to be like everyone else?" John Cusack is funny, frustrated and nobly compassionate as David evolves into a caring father. In a moving scene he tells Dennis, "There is nothing you can do to change the way I feel about you…" Cusack commands the story's humanity and underlying strength.

We all want to make a difference in life. And we all want to able to love and be loved—that is what it is to be human. "Martian Child" ultimately celebrates our humanity.


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