6.2/10
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Thirst (2004)

The control over public water supply is significant policy issue around the world. Documentarians Alan Snitow and Deborah Kaufman take a close look at the global business trend of privatizing water supplies.

Director:

Alan Snitow
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Cast

Credited cast:
Mahmoud Abu-Zeid Mahmoud Abu-Zeid ... Himself - President, World Water Council
Bill Alexander Bill Alexander ... Himself - CEO, Thames Water
Dezaraye Bagalayos Dezaraye Bagalayos ... Herself - Citizens Coalition
Maude Barlow ... Herself - Chair, Council of Canadians
Satinder Bindra Satinder Bindra ... Himself (archive footage)
John Briscoe John Briscoe ... Himself - Senior Water Advisor, World Bank
Dean Cofer Dean Cofer ... Himself - Operating Engineers Union
Don Evans Don Evans ... Himself - President, OMI
Dreda Gaines Dreda Gaines ... Herself - Vice President, Thames Water America
Sylvia Kothe Sylvia Kothe ... Herself - Chair, Citizens Coalition
Bill Loyko Bill Loyko ... Himself - Citzens Coalition
Michael McDonald Michael McDonald ... Himself - Supervisor, Stockton Municipal Wastewater Plant
Crown Prince Naruhito Crown Prince Naruhito ... Himself (as Prince Naruhito of Japan)
Oscar Olivera ... Himself - La Coordinadora, Bolivia
Gérard Payen Gérard Payen ... Himself - CEO, Ondeo / Suez Water
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Storyline

The control over public water supply is significant policy issue around the world. Documentarians Alan Snitow and Deborah Kaufman take a close look at the global business trend of privatizing water supplies.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

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Details

Official Sites:

PBS [United States]

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 June 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dipsa See more »

Filming Locations:

Bolivia See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
Brilliant anti-capitalist documentary
30 April 2005 | by mgconlanSee all my reviews

There are some things so basic to human life that they don't belong in the free-market system, and water is definitely one of them. That's the message of this brilliant documentary, whose heroes are activists fighting to protect the rights of ordinary people to control their water supplies, either through government ownership or direct action (like the so-called "rainwater harvesters" of India, who dig their own ponds to collect rainwater in desert climates and fear that their work will be expropriated by multinational corporations like Coca-Cola and Pepsi). With human populations increasing and water resources staying about the same, there's a basic question for the future: will water continue to be a readily available human resource, or will it be privatized and become a luxury good controlled by multinational corporations, and will those who can't afford to pay for it be told just to do without and die? "Thirst" could have made an even stronger case against water privatization — an examination of what happened when Atlanta privatized its water supply (water bills shot up, quality went down and Atlantans started turning on their taps and getting a brown fluid instead of clean water) would have bolstered the film — but as it stands it's quite powerful and impassioned.


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